59

On the other hand, my PM/ PO salary is good and I don't see how I could transition from a role that's close to IT, but non-technical to a technical role without sacrificing my standard of life. As a junior developer I would earn about 30% of my current salary. Any ideas how it could work? You are looking for someone to take a gamble and overpay you ...


20

Just for clarity's sake, DoD Secret is not a Top Secret clearance. Those are separate levels of restricted access. Additionally, requiring an "active" clearance means you must already be cleared for classified work. Most companies can hire someone without a clearance, if it's obvious they will be able to obtain one, but they will almost always ...


13

IANAL,First thing first, you have to check you contract See if there is a clause about working for a customer your current employer introduced you to. Then do your math, salary, job security, advancement potential


12

It's you. You want to do all the fun stuff, and leave all the boring stuff to other people. Meanwhile, your employer wants a small team of people who will just get on with whatever needs doing on the project now. If you are working in any industry that involves secrecy (and that's quite a few when you bring in personal data protection rules), then you ...


11

The best way to make this transition would be to make it a gradual one within your current job. You will need to talk to your boss about this. First learn as much as you can. You will probably need to do this in your own time and may have some expenses. You can consider going to university but most people are self-taught. Second take on technical tasks at ...


8

Understanding what excites you at work is a universal challenge - we've all felt like you're feeling now at many points in our careers. You might consider different "sources of meaning" as your reflect on your current role or potential future roles: Self - "What's in it for me?" Do you enjoy improving your own skills, learning about new topics, or ...


7

And what is stopping you from applying for jobs in companies where you think you can make a impact? If you can't leave your job because of money (or any other reason) maybe you can start working as a volunteer on something that might have a more immediate effect, like helping feed the poor in your city, or maybe teaching people in the poor part of town how ...


6

With six years of work experience already, that recent company can easily be explained away (or even left off your resume entirely if the period was very short). Your company was restructured and your department went through a spin-off and a complete change in mission and technology. Part of this can easily be verified if they just call your employer. ...


6

You don't mention your age, but 4 - 5 years in one field suggests you haven't been doing this professionally for all that long? That said, there's no rule that you can't be disinterested in a career path at any point. I'm a developer myself and in a similar mindset to you, but in my case, I've been working in the industry for 16 years since I graduated. ...


6

I cannot tell you which choice to make, but I can give you pertinent insight. The clearance doesn't just "look good on your resume". It makes you worth more money. Jobs that require clearances pay more. The solution to contracts running out, if you go that route, is to keep six months in the bank. You assume that you will get laid off, and you use that ...


5

Answering the question "are they useful": Any experience is obviously going to be positive (or certainly not negative). But I get the feeling you want to know: Is it worthwhile? To that I would say no. Generally speaking, internships are to learn how to work in an office environment and show that you can commit to a job. Some people are lucky and get ones ...


5

Material value is not the only reason to do things. The pursuit of a PhD might provide "material" value in the form of quality of life. It could open up job opportunities that could provide a higher degree of work-life balance, traveling opportunities, better location. The PhD might open up specific career paths that might offer more industry influence, ...


5

if I decided to go forward, I would tell my current manager, because I don't want him to find out from the HR, and that I went behind his back You will do no such thing. First you find a job, then you tell your boss about your plans to move on, not the other way around. The only time this is an exception when you have strong enough relationship with the ...


5

Here are some things you might try: Warehouse work. Not a lot of skill required, and no learning curve. Depending on where you are, it might be abundantly available right now. Amazon is hiring an army. Delivery work. There is no particular skill required or a learning curve. It depends on where you live, but you may not need a car. In larger/warmer cities, ...


4

Python is the 4th most widely used language at the moment, so just apply for jobs. Not all companies will require a degree, and even those that say they do may still talk to you if they don't get many other applicants. Most junior programmer jobs don't actually need degree-level knowledge, companies just ask for it so they don't get swamped by people with ...


4

I am a software engineer and a good friend is a data engineer “Data Engineering” is not a well defined term. On one extreme, it’s another name for typical data science and business analytics. On the other, it is no different from backend software engineering with databases or frontend engineering with API calls and state changes. A software engineering ...


4

As said by other answers, check your contract and local laws. IANAL, but depending on your country, you can accept your offer even if your contract is supposed to prevent you to do this (in France, most IT Service Company contracts contains clauses preventing you to accept an offer by a customer but are never applied because they're not really legal). I ...


4

and after two weeks I left that place. This is important because switching often is undesired. If you only spent two weeks at a job, you just leave it off your resume. That makes it irrelevant when being considered for employment. You will not look like a hopper. Java developer spends as much time working with configs as with design/java code. Most of ...


4

Think of this as mid-career professional growth rather than a career restart in a new field. Your training and work experience are potentially very valuable to some employer. Try drafting a resume for yourself explaining how you are a great candidate for a ML job involving real world data. You are! Then search for job openings that interest you, and ...


4

Engineering and management do not have much in common. Although you can learn about management as an engineer, by interacting with the managers, it will not be enough, usually. You can try my approach: move from pure engineer / developer to team lead / (software) project manager. Once you have good experience with that (it can be as little as one year, ...


4

The book Rhinoceros Success has an entire section on renewal. It's also called Sharpening the Axe Since this has happened to you before, I strongly suggest you seek ways to increase your down time, and find ways to recharge, renew, and be more effective. I am the poster boy for burnout in that it took me FIVE YEARS to bounce back. What I had to do was to ...


3

There are two questions baked into one here. "I have spent X years doing only skill alpha. I have grown bored with alpha, and want to start doing something else, eg, beta. How do I get a job doing beta, when all my experience is in alpha? "Specifically, I am an expert in C#, ASP.NET Web forms, MCV, Winforms, WPF, SQL, and WCF. What is a good new field for ...


3

Sorry to hear that - it's never nice to be "duped" into a role that you weren't expecting, and don't want. My manager is saying they will eventually update to MEAN stack but sometime later which I highly doubt. "Eventually" means "maybe, if we have to, in a decade or so, if we're all still around then". For all intents and purposes, it probably means "...


3

They are much the same as they have been for many years. Most people are promoted into management. That can start as being the team lead. Then on to project management. Then all the way up the food chain to head of a department. A few people will be promoted into a "subject matter expert" role. But these may be rare in commercial organizations. All ...


3

Hobby project: Do what you like (and what you want to do) is it webdesign, make a website; apps, make an app; programs, make a program. But do something you like. Follow courses: and I do not mean tutorialpoint or the like (they are useful to start) but I mean courses as on coursera or another MOOC (massive open online course) platform. This will also help ...


3

I'm doing ok but feel like it's too much organization, communication and change management than I will ever feel happy with. As Helena says in a comment, A lot of development roles require a lot of that kind of thing, especially as you go beyond junior level - taking a development career path won't necessarily allow you to avoid it. These include ...


2

This is a tough situation to be in. What I have heard from recruiters (and the experiences of friends and relatives has confirmed this) is that in the IT world any employment gap of longer than two months in your resume will cause prospective employers to shuffle you to the back of the pile. A six month gap sends you straight to the "round file". I've ...


2

Specifically I am looking for advice on a potential career that a software engineer would be well I don't think that's answerable; there are too many unknowns. We don't for example even know what you like doing. The main reason being ... overtime, under-appreciation ... of good software by management ..., unrealistic deadlines OK so other than ...


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