252

I spent a lot of time refactoring and trying to remove technical debt. I received a verbal warning for under-performing before going on holidays. It seems here you were working on something that wasn't asked for. This is generally very bad, and can lead to termination. If you think the project needs refactoring, and I trust you that it did, you must sell it ...


225

Today I was fired from a software company.. for the 3rd time in 1.5 years. Needless to say I feel like I reached bottom and it's impossible to get out without changing career. Should I change a career? Is it even possible to find a job now? Yup, that's pretty bad. But remember that you weren't sure anyone would hire you after being fired before - yet ...


162

Understand why you're getting fired You've said it yourself. You're focusing on rewriting, when that isn't what you're there to do. You have a really bad case of Not Invented Here syndrome. As far as management goes, the problem seems to be about whether you're prepared to do what your manager tells you and get your work done, or whether you're going to ...


37

Basically, you've gotten yourself stuck where you don't want to be because you've been worrying about what other people expect of you. It's time to stop doing what other people tell you too, and to start the career path that you want to follow and be happy. Now, you have three years experience as a developer - it might not be the tech stack you want, and ...


30

I have a tendency to cleanup messy code, refactor and ensure things are well tested - something that can be seen by many as slow performing. I'm going to go out on a limb and assume this is more than the usual boy scouting. So: I have a tendency to choose to cleanup messy code, refactor and ensure things are well tested, whenever they are "adjacent" to ...


27

I suggest that you wrote down your cook experience and emphasize what you learn that you can use in your next position. We hired some candidates as a Junior Developer in past companies where I work that they were Cook for multiples years. They emphasize in their resume that they learn soft skills like team communication, planning, etc. because they are ...


23

Ouch You don't need me to tell you that this isn't good so I'm not going to belabour the point but it's worth a quick look at the three firings: Case 1: Fired from a fintech company on the 2nd month for not performing. This was correct since I had a lack of motivation. Nothing to say here - you know you messed up. Something tells me that lack of ...


22

I have wasted 3 starting years of my career. Is there any way to start over? You have not lost any years, you learned many things. http://norvig.com/21-days.html is providing a mind-provoking insight. And you need to read Bullshit jobs, it is mind provoking and covers quite well software development jobs, since most software projects (more than half of them)...


21

It sounds to me like many devs who are "Java developers" and do not want to learn python because you can do everything with Java... The way I see it, is that you have a good opportunity here! How many people have a good knowledge of AWS and Azure? Also what I have learn over the years is that knowing several technologies almost always plays to your ...


18

I realise there are already 16 answers here, many of them excellent, but they don't seem to have addressed that there is a small possibility that there could be other reasons for being fired. It might just be that these have been convenient excuses for your firing. It is never nice to point this out, but it's worth examining if you are fitting in on a ...


15

By your own account, you've had 6 jobs in 8 years and you "have a hard time understanding large legacy codebases." Each job switch brings its own stresses: new rules to learn, new pecking order and new legacy code base. I recommend first staying at one job longer. Even the ugliest code base should start to make sense after a while or you'll have more ...


13

I'm guessing that not listening is a key problem. Not just hearing words, but understanding and taking them to heart. This jumps out at me: Generally the issue as I see it, is that I have a tendency to cleanup messy code, refactor and ensure things are well tested - something that can be seen by many as slow performing. "That can be seen by many as ...


13

You say "I have no interest to learn". That is your right. On the other hand, your employer may no longer be interested in keeping you employed. That's their right. You can talk with your manager. That is, usually, a good thing. In this particular case, however, there are two options: Company wants to have staff for both platforms. Probably there will be ...


12

C experience will be a BIG plus for any future job applications. As stated by 520 it is most certainly not obsolete and along with C++ is the main path for low level programming. Even if you decide to go to higher level languages in the future, C/C++ will make your comp science and programming fundamentals incredibly strong. Lower Level -> Higher Level is ...


11

Is it better to quit the job or continue. Ask your boss what is happening first.


11

You asked, I'd like know how to leave in good terms and not to burn bridges, Is that possible at all? Yes, it is possible. Just find a new job, get the contract, give your notice, and go work for your new employer. People do it all the time - you won't be burning any bridges unless you go out of your way to cause trouble. Make sure you understand if ...


10

I have been working in development for over 30 years. I have been in jobs that were hell. The one I've been in for the past 10 years has been mostly a delight. The difference? Not 'what' I'm doing, but 'who' I'm doing it with, how they relate to each other, and what the overall corporate culture is. Unless you truly simply don't like development itself, I'...


10

No, there will be no negative impact, unless you create one. However, before you take the decision, make sure of one thing: the reason for which you left the organization earlier, is not present currently (to the best of your ability to foresee). If you think that problem (or side effects) are not relevant to the (re)new engagement - by all means, feel free ...


9

Many outdoors jobs require little to no skill apart from being healthy and willing to work. You'd be surprised how many well educated and certified people are hiding away in the back of beyond doing them. Forestry work springs to mind, planting, spraying, not so much logging unless you know how to use tools. Plenty of forestry jobs in my foreman days I'd ...


9

You could always teach computing in high school if you think your industry career path is limited. There are other things you can do like project management too. But when you do apply for another position, don't explain your firings as management problems. Even if the manager was completely responsible for what happened, you will give the impression that ...


9

There are some testing positions out there, in which a knowledge of development is likely to be useful. You will have an advantage in automating tests, if nothing else. When I was on a testing gig, I found a horrible bug around 5 PM on Friday, and had a relaxing weekend. My wife also liked me better when I was testing than when I was developing.


9

You can certainly explain to your employer that you you're not keen to do anything Azure related but I don't expect it to go well for you. Depending on the availability of other staff to pick up the Azure training and work you refuse and the supply of AWS work to keep you fully utilized they may not go as far as dropping you but even so I'd expect it to be ...


9

Usually MNC's usually won't consider people with arrears, unless with large experience. Its more than ok on smaller companies. My advice is to take a job in a smaller company, study and pass the arrear and switch to MNCs (if you are interested).


9

You really have no choice but to be honest and list the various things that have happened. You do get some leeway at how terse you choose to write each item but at the same time do not write falsehoods. The problem you face is that if you neglect to list the items and then someone doing investigation ultimately finds out then things will go very bad for ...


9

Consider taking your recent experience as having a potentially very positive impact on your future. As an employer, and a hiring manager, I like to see candidates who can fail, learn from the failure, and then grow as a result. No matter what your career, or how much change you're actually looking for, none of us are perfect, and none of us are complete ...


9

Briefly mention that you were a cook but other than that do not go into detail unless you have your resume is looking bare then I suggest you talk about it just to show that you have had a professional career and not a 5 year break. Otherwise just keep your resume relevant to the jobs you are applying for.


9

"I know that I thrive in situations where I have a managing/coordinating/organizing role" If you stick around for a while and also bare with boring tasks as well and gather enough overview/experience, working your way up (junior-> senior -> lead), you could later look into consulting/management. Given that you are around 30 there will be still a road ...


8

I'm going to completely disagree with the other answers here So, I came out here to find all the answers telling you to behave, keep your head low, accept the criticism, work on assigned tasks and improve communication. First of all - you absolutely should improve your communication skills. It's something you can work on and improve and I would consider ...


8

I know the feeling of wanting to spend a lot of time improving code quality to increase the speed of development. They can absolutely save massive amounts of time, up to and including making complex projects doable in the first place. However, I would be careful to introduce those slowly when starting a new job. Expect it to take months to build up enough ...


8

It's not really clear (to me at least) what you mean by a "new sub-field" but I suppose, per your question, that's not the point. You really have two choices: Find a way to fit your new concept into what employers are already asking for. In other words, don't call it something new - just find positions that employers are trying to fill in order to solve ...


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