39

Basically, you've gotten yourself stuck where you don't want to be because you've been worrying about what other people expect of you. It's time to stop doing what other people tell you too, and to start the career path that you want to follow and be happy. Now, you have three years experience as a developer - it might not be the tech stack you want, and ...


27

I suggest that you wrote down your cook experience and emphasize what you learn that you can use in your next position. We hired some candidates as a Junior Developer in past companies where I work that they were Cook for multiples years. They emphasize in their resume that they learn soft skills like team communication, planning, etc. because they are ...


22

I have wasted 3 starting years of my career. Is there any way to start over? You have not lost any years, you learned many things. Teach Yourself Programming in Ten Years provides a mind-provoking insight. You should also read Bullshit jobs, it is mind provoking and covers quite well software development jobs, since most software projects (more than half of ...


13

IANAL,First thing first, you have to check you contract See if there is a clause about working for a customer your current employer introduced you to. Then do your math, salary, job security, advancement potential


12

C experience will be a BIG plus for any future job applications. As stated by 520 it is most certainly not obsolete and along with C++ is the main path for low level programming. Even if you decide to go to higher level languages in the future, C/C++ will make your comp science and programming fundamentals incredibly strong. Lower Level -> Higher Level is ...


11

Is it better to quit the job or continue. Ask your boss what is happening first.


11

You asked, I'd like know how to leave in good terms and not to burn bridges, Is that possible at all? Yes, it is possible. Just find a new job, get the contract, give your notice, and go work for your new employer. People do it all the time - you won't be burning any bridges unless you go out of your way to cause trouble. Make sure you understand if ...


10

Usually MNC's usually won't consider people with arrears, unless with large experience. Its more than ok on smaller companies. My advice is to take a job in a smaller company, study and pass the arrear and switch to MNCs (if you are interested).


10

No, there will be no negative impact, unless you create one. However, before you take the decision, make sure of one thing: the reason for which you left the organization earlier, is not present currently (to the best of your ability to foresee). If you think that problem (or side effects) are not relevant to the (re)new engagement - by all means, feel free ...


9

You really have no choice but to be honest and list the various things that have happened. You do get some leeway at how terse you choose to write each item but at the same time do not write falsehoods. The problem you face is that if you neglect to list the items and then someone doing investigation ultimately finds out then things will go very bad for ...


9

Consider taking your recent experience as having a potentially very positive impact on your future. As an employer, and a hiring manager, I like to see candidates who can fail, learn from the failure, and then grow as a result. No matter what your career, or how much change you're actually looking for, none of us are perfect, and none of us are complete ...


9

Briefly mention that you were a cook but other than that do not go into detail unless you have your resume is looking bare then I suggest you talk about it just to show that you have had a professional career and not a 5 year break. Otherwise just keep your resume relevant to the jobs you are applying for.


9

"I know that I thrive in situations where I have a managing/coordinating/organizing role" If you stick around for a while and also bare with boring tasks as well and gather enough overview/experience, working your way up (junior-> senior -> lead), you could later look into consulting/management. Given that you are around 30 there will be still a road ...


8

It's not really clear (to me at least) what you mean by a "new sub-field" but I suppose, per your question, that's not the point. You really have two choices: Find a way to fit your new concept into what employers are already asking for. In other words, don't call it something new - just find positions that employers are trying to fill in order to solve ...


7

You have a productive employee that you trust, that you know the work ethic of, and that would like to change her career. She is clearly not entirely happy being a developer. There is already a chance she might think about leaving. Maybe she'd like a less stressful role as a marketing or design person who is not required to fix things with long hours, or ...


7

Why do you have to leave? Right now, you are well-paid at your current job, and you provide a lot of value-add in terms of soft skills and detailed subject matter knowledge about the way the company works and its particular niche market. You have kids, and as a result do not have the time to adapt to new tech. That suggests rather strongly that this is ...


7

Considering C to be almost an obsolete technology now No it is most certainly not! C and it's younger brother C++ are the cornerstone of low-level software development. Pretty much anything that is seriously performance-sensitive is made in C/C++. The two are very similar languages, and there is nothing out there that can realistically replace C++ (which is ...


7

Any time a person is planning the next step in their career, the advise is generally the same (even if you're switching industries or jobs): Determine your ultimate goal. You want a career in cybersecurity. Check off this step. Determine your next step to reach that goal. You've correctly identified that you likely won't be hired into a high level position ...


6

The way I see it, you can now safely remove the previous, un-related work experience from your resume, as you've already established a notable experience in your newer line of work. If I were you, I'd simply add a section in my resume citing my past experience briefly, just in case future employers would wonder what I was doing in past years, i.e.: 2011 - ...


6

I made a career change about 8 years ago from IT to a much different field. I did include my IT career on my resume simply because it is a work history -- it showed I could keep a job, etc. Just recently (6 months) I lost my job and have had to fall back on my IT career until I find a new job in my new field. I was completely open and honest in the ...


6

I cannot tell you which choice to make, but I can give you pertinent insight. The clearance doesn't just "look good on your resume". It makes you worth more money. Jobs that require clearances pay more. The solution to contracts running out, if you go that route, is to keep six months in the bank. You assume that you will get laid off, and you use that ...


6

And what is stopping you from applying for jobs in companies where you think you can make a impact? If you can't leave your job because of money (or any other reason) maybe you can start working as a volunteer on something that might have a more immediate effect, like helping feed the poor in your city, or maybe teaching people in the poor part of town how ...


5

With six years of work experience already, that recent company can easily be explained away (or even left off your resume entirely if the period was very short). Your company was restructured and your department went through a spin-off and a complete change in mission and technology. Part of this can easily be verified if they just call your employer. ...


5

Understanding what excites you at work is a universal challenge - we've all felt like you're feeling now at many points in our careers. You might consider different "sources of meaning" as your reflect on your current role or potential future roles: Self - "What's in it for me?" Do you enjoy improving your own skills, learning about new topics, or ...


4

I'd like know how to leave in good terms and not to burn bridges, Is that possible at all? Yes- Just leave the company and follow their procedures for leaving (2 week notice for most jobs in the US, not sure about standard procedure for South America). Throughout the body of your post you somehow feel like your in debt to the company simply because they ...


4

Never quit a job unless you have a new one or you know you're not going to get paid. Check with your manager or human resources, when will you be getting paid. If it's not too far in the future then just wait. If it's too far then find out how much. Chalk it up as a good lesson for future jobs to make sure you have some sort of agreement before taking a ...


4

You asked a few questions: Firstly, Considering C to be almost an obsolete technology now, how will that impact my career? As has been pointed out in comments, we need to challenge the assumption that C is "almost obsolete" - certainly, there's a large body of work already developed in C, and that work is being maintained and expanded constantly. In ...


4

Usually there is no problem in working again for a previous employer, as long as it is good for you. For example, I was in a company where I had stagnated, where I was the unofficial leader of the team but was trying to make it official. Since that would involve payment raise, I was having trouble achieving it. I then received an invitation to join another ...


4

That really depends. Did you just recently change fields? Are you fresh out of college? A potential employer may want to see the past 10 years of employment experience. If you're 22 and you've been in IT for a few years, it's not a big deal. If you're 32 and you've been a web developer for 2 years, they're going to want to know what you were ...


4

Not sure I'm the best there is to answer this as I'm a ripely aged 31 right now. However, on with it. First up, getting bored when getting stuck is not not-normal (-- === +). I get bored. I also get stuck. Sometimes they're related. Mainly I find boredom with/when coding has a few reasons (for me): the project is boring (no matter the challenge in the ...


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