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Engineering and management do not have much in common. Although you can learn about management as an engineer, by interacting with the managers, it will not be enough, usually. You can try my approach: move from pure engineer / developer to team lead / (software) project manager. Once you have good experience with that (it can be as little as one year, ...


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Management? If you lead a team of engineers/developers/... you might be focusing mainly on design and the other points you gave, and they take care of the ground work. Of course your experience is important so that you know how to guide them and also are able to check and, if needed, correct their work, but you will do less "nitty-gritty work". If you can ...


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I don't know about the particular circumstances of the German job market, but if I were you I would accompany the CV with a cover letter, where I would explain the reasons for the career change and why I would be a good hire for the company. For instance you could highlight that, because of your past experience, you can negotiate with stake-holders, manage ...


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Most devices (phones, robots, doorbells...) being manufactured now require a mix of mechanical, electronics, and software design. You have the skills and experience to work in a design group as the person who can talk to everyone and work on problems involving a mix of hardware and software issues.


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In a comment, you mentioned being "biased towards machine learning as it is a hot topic and I have some academic knowledge already". Don't assume too much from the hot-topicness of ML. It's been a hot topic for long enough to build up a large group of ML-educated entry-level developers. That's not to say that you should dismiss the idea of retraining, but ...


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Think of this as mid-career professional growth rather than a career restart in a new field. Your training and work experience are potentially very valuable to some employer. Try drafting a resume for yourself explaining how you are a great candidate for a ML job involving real world data. You are! Then search for job openings that interest you, and ...


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In my experience this is very much dependent on team size, i.e. scaling. If you are in a large company (AND it translates to a large development team(s) ), then the things you mention are not unreasonable. Proper CI pipelines are then expected, so are departments specifically for testing. In this case it's them. On the other hand, in a small company ...


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and after two weeks I left that place. This is important because switching often is undesired. If you only spent two weeks at a job, you just leave it off your resume. That makes it irrelevant when being considered for employment. You will not look like a hopper. Java developer spends as much time working with configs as with design/java code. Most of ...


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It's you. You want to do all the fun stuff, and leave all the boring stuff to other people. Meanwhile, your employer wants a small team of people who will just get on with whatever needs doing on the project now. If you are working in any industry that involves secrecy (and that's quite a few when you bring in personal data protection rules), then you ...


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You don't mention your age, but 4 - 5 years in one field suggests you haven't been doing this professionally for all that long? That said, there's no rule that you can't be disinterested in a career path at any point. I'm a developer myself and in a similar mindset to you, but in my case, I've been working in the industry for 16 years since I graduated. ...


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