New answers tagged

0

A lot of the age discrimination is a perception that you are unwilling/unable to learn anything new. A former HR person was willing to admit that in a PBS interview a while back. And if you watch the entire thing, in particular the bit about getting a B in computers, you will see why they have that concern. And many developers fit that stereotype. Obviously ...


4

I'm 53 and still get companies coming to me (with generous salaries)... it's about what skills you bring, and whether they way you are perceived fits what the company wants. Older developers could be seen as having a more stable life, less of a flight risk, more able to take charge of things, having solid experience to compensate for the slower learning, ...


9

It seems based on what I've heard that the industry as a whole is somewhat rife with age discrimination, and at a certain point you will no longer be hired for development roles with consistency. I don't personally know anyone that was unable to work due to age discrimination. I worked in software until I retired at 61. At that time I was working with ...


2

I hear more and more stories about developers who get old and don't get hired again. Older developers who "don't get hired again" are usually not getting hired for reasons that have nothing to do with them being older. It's usually other reasons that they prefer to dress up as being about their age because it's more palatable for them to relate as ...


2

It is entirely possible. That's not to say it's easy. It will take a considerable amount of dedication to pull it off, and depending on your personal circumstances will be easier for some than others. A 30 year old with 2 kids and a spouse, a heavy mortgage and debt is possibly going to find the transition harder than a single person who can tighten the ...


0

You do not mention in detail the skills you already have, so it is a bit hard to guess what you would need. Nonetheless, and as you noted, the skills of hackers vary greatly. Some people have only have a knowledge of unix systems, other are hardcore .NET Windows programmers, some of them may not even know how to program properly. Some are good doing reverse ...


3

I would suggest to plan this out throughly. While mid 20s are not old, you are old enough that your career decisions are slowly setting in stone. You will spend a lot of time on training for new stuff and do you really want to spend your precious time on preparing to start from zero instead of furthering your existing career ? By the time you retrain and ...


3

There are multiple types of “IT” industry, and some may be a better fit for your skill set. Just some examples from my own experience: Pure software development company (or development function in a very large enterprise). In this kind of company Product Management may be a good route for you: a lot of the job requirements are similar to what you’ve done, ...


Top 50 recent answers are included