Hot answers tagged

394

I was hired for a 2.5 month contract. I was warned by friends and family not to throw myself into the work and not finish too quickly. I ignored them, and did the job in 3 weeks. My employer had me budgeted for the full 2.5 months (I did not know this when I did the job). When I finished early, I was asked to assist with a process that was taking 10 ...


320

The reality is that newcomers will be paid more than you. That’s how it goes. Volunteering for a pay cut for no reason whatsoever is about the most ridiculous thing you could ever do. Don’t do it. Don’t mention it. Don’t even think about it. If they let you go for your high pay, you go somewhere else for a higher pay. Adding DarkCygnus’ suggestion: DONT ...


252

I spent a lot of time refactoring and trying to remove technical debt. I received a verbal warning for under-performing before going on holidays. It seems here you were working on something that wasn't asked for. This is generally very bad, and can lead to termination. If you think the project needs refactoring, and I trust you that it did, you must sell it ...


225

Today I was fired from a software company.. for the 3rd time in 1.5 years. Needless to say I feel like I reached bottom and it's impossible to get out without changing career. Should I change a career? Is it even possible to find a job now? Yup, that's pretty bad. But remember that you weren't sure anyone would hire you after being fired before - yet ...


162

Understand why you're getting fired You've said it yourself. You're focusing on rewriting, when that isn't what you're there to do. You have a really bad case of Not Invented Here syndrome. As far as management goes, the problem seems to be about whether you're prepared to do what your manager tells you and get your work done, or whether you're going to ...


146

As other answers have stated, learning the technology isn’t too big a deal; it’ll be like learning any other technology stack. But while you’re worrying about whether you’re up to the task, remember to do your due diligence in researching whether the “company” itself is up to the task. A “startup” in a buzzwordy field that cold-calls folks without ...


145

You will probably get answers telling you there is no need to catch up, which may be a valid point. However you are specifically asking to catch up so I will try to help. I took awhile to graduate from university, and in fact I did not start until I was out of high school for two years. I believe I am in a similar situation as you are. I graduated in ...


131

What you are basically saying is "I want to continue to get more and more money without continuing to produce more value". I'm not saying you're not providing value as an individual contributor, but in order to continue to increase the value you produce, you have to provide some sort of leadership. Think of it this way, did you spring forth from your ...


119

I know developers who successfully moved on towards a happier and more valuable developer career. They usually picked a special subject and worked to become an expert in that field. They also joined special projects that often lie outside of the classic corporate world. A few examples would be a friend who became a Linux developer joining RedHat, another ...


118

How do I explain a 17-year hole in my resume? Sounds like your explanation is "My career stopped due to a freak, totally debilitating accident that took me 17 year to completely recover from." No need to get more elaborate than that. As @snow mentions in the comment below, this isn't something you put in your resume. It's just a way to explain it when ...


109

Whatever you end up doing, please remember two things: ideas/big pictures are valueless without skill and experience, and skills and experience is valuable even without ideas/big picture. I strongly suggest you decide to gain more skill and experience before you focus on any end goals. Possibly in the process you will see a clearer direction for yourself.


93

Perhaps I'm not thinking this straight, would like to get your advice on how to proceed in the best way. First, find another job. Then send your manager an email that says "This is my written notice of resignation from Foo Corporation; my last day will be June 1st. Sincerely, teddy". Easy peasy. If I quit, my biggest concerns are the following: ...


85

Applying to the same sort of jobs that Bachelors grads apply to, and expecting them to offer X dollars a year more because of your degree is not a viable strategy. Don't expect to be paid for the initials. But DO expect to be paid for your skills. Apply to jobs that need capabilities you have that a fresh grad does not, and show up to interviews ready to ...


77

You basically nailed it on the head. Your situation is "hopeless" without being willing to do the work necessary to transform abstract ideas in to material actions. According to your post you have: No relevant education or qualifications No money No talent (other than big ideas) No skills or experience So, your value proposition is: Has ideas, sort of. ...


76

This doesn't really seem to have any benefits to you. The only situation where this makes sense is if you both: Expect to get laid off explicitly because of your higher pay Like the job enough you'd want to keep it even at the reduced pay That being said, a few reasons why it doesn't make sense to take a pay cut: Hiring is expensive in nearly all cases, ...


74

Congratulations on been selected for the job! You got hired because, you showed results of what you are capable of. Don't pretend to know things you don't. Be aware: others are also fighting imposter syndrome. You are not alone. This industry continually evolves. Everyone has to keep learning, or they fall behind. There will always be someone who knows ...


68

I think you can explain it just like you did here, but in your resume, mention the gap, for instance: 2001-2018 Unable to work due to an accident And, in your cover letter, you can add details and say that you have now totally recovered from this accident and it won't be a problem for your work. I would not advise you to ignore it on your resume and ...


67

Your post reads like you want me to tell you to quit. Ultimately, that's a decision you have to make and not really one anyone here can answer meaningfully. Always focus on the other opportunity when quitting a job. There are rare exceptions to this, but broadly speaking, if you have to ask "how should I quit?" you probably should follow that advice. I ...


66

I suspect that by the time you've done this a couple times, you won't be getting many interviews at companies that you'd like to work for. Realistically, unless you want things out of a job that very few other developers do, the sort of companies that you'd want to work at are the sort of companies that a lot of other developers are applying to as well. ...


60

On the one hand I feel it's wrong to ignore your family completely in pursuit of continuous learning. It is wrong to ignore your family completely. And it's completely unnecessary. So the question is, how do I manage/approach this properly so that I can get some sort of balance? I got my Master's degree while I had two young children. And I've spent ...


58

I've generally found the following strategy useful: Apply to jobs at a higher pay grade. You won't get paid more if you don't ask for more. Be sure to put the master's degree on your resume. When asked about projects you've done in the past, be sure to use your dissertation as an example. This helps show the worth of your degree: it's given you valuable ...


51

From a senior dev spot the options for better salary and moving up tend to be: Management - this includes Tech lead which is a management spot however low level. Specialization - this means becoming the expert in something, preferably expertise in something that multiple companies need. This can be going into architects jobs, or a big data specialization, ...


48

Be wary of accepting a counter-offer. If you take the counter-offer, when the next performance review comes around, you may hear that you are now above the top salary for your pay grade, and are ineligible for further adjustment. It's also possible that you will be looked upon as disloyal, and will not be considered for further promotion. At worst, you ...


43

Are you the company owner, or are you an employee who is working under an agreement to supply quality work product for fair compensation? Obviously, a rhetorical question. Obviously, you care about your co-workers. That is admirable and commendable. But, ultimately, it's not your responsibility to make your own life miserable to make theirs a bit more ...


41

Are you sure you're vaguely competent? I mean, there are plenty of people who get good grades, but are completely incapable of doing the actual work. Sure, the lack of work experience is a big problem. Sure, the CIS degree is a big problem. Sure, living in a small town is a big problem. But after 5 years of interviewing, someone should've taken a chance on ...


41

One thought is perhaps doing some voluntary work for a drug charity: helping those recovering, warning children of the dangers etc. (I say this because I know someone who got convicted of a similar offense who does just this.) I think on a resume and at interview that would be a good thing to see. It shows contrition/regret and wanting to pay society back ...


36

The problem here is you already proved to them you can and will do it for $15/hr as you already did part of it. Unfortunately, we often don't get to pick and choose our tasks. If you decline doing this, you will more than likely be terminated for not doing what was asked of you and they will just hire someone who is willing to do it for $15/hr (trust me ...


34

Let me explain it like this. They have one opening and 350 applicants who meet the minimum requirement. Most of the people who meet the qualification will not be interviewed. You have to have something that makes you stand out from the stack of resumes. When I first graduated from college, it was year when there were almost no entry level jobs available ...


32

You should take care of both variants; the LinkedIn profile matters for many recruiters. I think the on-line profiles will be more powerful in the future than the actual CVs are. Also having a website to show off your awesome work is a very big plus as more and more new companies are interested in this kind of way to evaluate candidates. Some of them will ...


30

First, let me disagree with comments saying that this question is not answerable. It is, but with an important note: There are many factors by which large companies differ from smaller ones. Each factor may be either a benefit or a disadvantage, depending on your personality. So, there is no ultimate answer like "go for a large company, period". In the ...


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