Hot answers tagged

300

First, if you worked 53 hours, you need to bill for 53. The client is getting the value of 10 extra hours, and you're giving it away for nothing? Don't do that any more. Second, "budget problems" is a negotiating tactic in this situation. The value of your work hasn't decreased a bit. You can't call your phone company, electric company, or landlord and ...


255

This is simple, get payment on what was contracted before doing any more. If they want EFGHIJKL then give them a quote on it. This is the professional way to do things. If you do EFG before getting paid out of some misplaced sense of 'whatever', expect to be told to do HIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ. Do what's in the contract, get paid, then negotiate anything extra. ...


235

First thing to do is double check and make certain that you issued the refund on your end. You say that his account says he has been refunded, but also go and find the actual bank transaction to be sure the money has left your own accounts. At that point you know you have done everything correctly, even if the bank has not. Second, share with Michael as ...


205

The client acted poorly. You did what any potential hire is expected to do. In business, taking candidates out to lunch or dinner is common, and acts as an incentive that gives the employer an opportunity to pitch the employer's idea. It's a cost of doing business, and an investment in eventually making a good hire. The fact that the client does not appear ...


177

Unless you are a supervisor of someone involved (which you are not), your role is to provide physical security (which it is not), or someone is at risk of severe personal harm (discretionary): DO NOT GET INVOLVED You should at all times act in a professional manner. The behaviour of others is no excuse to act in an unprofessional (and criminal) manner. ...


153

Just take the watch. Refusing it is a huge insult to the client... even if they don't know you refused it. The proper behavior is decline at first, then graciously accept the gift when pressed. Trying to "pay" for the watch is ridiculous. The watch was a gift. Trying to pay for gift is nearly as bad as refusing it outright. Have the watch mounted with a ...


148

Don't explain. Don't justify yourself. People decline job opportunities all the time. It's not a big deal. Do you think that a potential employer will tell you the truth if they decide not to hire you. Of course not. We're all human beings. We all have hidden biases. And we're all imperfect. Every employer would get sued if they'd let their employees tell ...


147

As a general rule, you don't solicit gifts from clients, you are offered them - asking for a gift can be seen very negatively by the client, especially if the contact you deal with is not in a position to offer such a gift off the bat. You could drop a mention that you are going to their park into casual conversation and see if an offer is forthcoming ...


145

Please don't mislead yourself, you are nothing more than an external contractor to the company. You are NOT part of the company, so there is no legal or moral reason to grant you anything more than you already have. You don't belong to the company, you are not their human resources, you work as a provider-client relationship. You have been paid, right? ...


144

If John asks you to go and deal with something for Alice, when you succeed you don't just walk away and assume Alice will tell John, especially if you're going to be invoicing for that item separately. Once it's settled, send John an email that says "I took care of the problem you told me about. It turned out to be X and it took Y hours; you'll see it on ...


133

It appears that you did everything that one would expect in your situation. The problem is with the other party's perception of what "Dinner" entails. It appears that to him, dinner is more of an orientation than a presentation. You had no obligation (or expectation) to provide him with a range ahead of time. Had it been a concern for him, he should ...


108

The right thing to do is to tell them as early as possible that you will be missing the deadline. The problem for the customer is usually not that you are missing the deadline. The problem is usually that you are missing the deadline while they expect you to hit it. They may be preparing to switch from an old system to a new one nine days from now. If you ...


108

If work was supposed to be fun, it wouldn't be called work. I'm sorry to tell you this, but welcome to the rest of your life. You might find a work that you enjoy MOST of the time, but you very likely won't find one that you enjoy ALL the time. What I suggest you do is think about the outcome of misbehaving during work (and in front of clients). You might ...


79

we do not have any contract or anything written down on paper This is not just the context, it's part of the problem. Don't get me wrong, not every favor you do a friend should be documented. But what you're doing now is much more than just a favor. You need to reevaluate what "friend" means in this context. As you know I keep most of my funds in ...


78

First thing, talk to your boss about the situation. The best option for you is if there is a company policy that prohibits taking gifts from clients. Your boss may even be in support of you lying and saying there is a policy even if there isn't one. Regardless of a policy, you can still go back and say, thank you, but I am not comfortable taking gifts like ...


77

Wow, that's some story. While I've never encountered anything remotely that extreme, I've been on both sides of conversations that go like this: Consultant: Are you aware of $dangerous_thing? Customer: Ack, no! Kill it! Consultant: I'm not authorized to do that right now. Here's what I need you to do... In the corporate-spying case, the issue ...


76

He wasted as much of your time as you did of his. Call it break-even. His disappointment at not getting you to work below your normal billing rates is his problem. Quote him a fair price at your rates, invite him to price-shop if he is so inclined, thank him for the opportunity to bid, and you're done until he makes an acceptable offer.


73

How can I tactfully, respectfully let the client know that these notes are irrelevant to me and are actually one of their member's jobs? You can try something like: "Hey, can you explain what these bugs are so we can know who to assign them to? It seems like they are related to text copy, which would be John's responsibility. But if they are implementation ...


68

I can renegotiate but this situation does not give me much security in the future. What would you do? How can I say in a professional way that I do not accept the proposal? I would refuse to negotiate my rate down. Frankly your rate is on the cheap side for that type of development and they should be grateful you are charging such a generous rate. If ...


66

I suspect that your client said you could make payment plans as a joke when you thought it was too much for you to accept, but never actually expected you to make payments. For now I would put the watch in a drawer in my desk and not worry about it. If after a month or so you do not hear from the client about the paying for it, just assume that the issue ...


64

I've encountered this in past. I think the spirit of the entertaining and hosting is what matters, not what you're drinking. A good idea would be to invite them to a social venue that has drinks but also food. Offer them drinks if they want, but get yourself a soft drink, "club soda with lime", or some other non-alcoholic drink. You could get water, but ...


64

they have requested I go through my client list with them to see crossover potential. How do I protect myself but at the same time not appear to be difficult? I am a team player, but without a contract being signed with them am unsure that handing them a client list is in my best interest. There is no way I would give a client list from my current ...


58

This is normal. The client doesn't have a good development team, so they contract some of the work to you. Their development team realise that you are a threat to their jobs so they have no incentive to help you. Their manager should have been aware that this was going to happen, and there are various things he can do to solve it, but that's not your ...


57

Now, how shall I decline this in polite English without being an ass, chauvinist, racist, and so on? It's unfortunate that a few bad times has soured you so much against an entire country, but if the job requires working with/for them and you feel this strongly, then just decline the offer. If you want to be honest, you tell the folks offering you the ...


57

How can I reassure her that the website I'm building won't have any "business logic"? You can't. Your client has no idea about anything technical, apparently, and you've already burned the trust bridge. She already wants to fire you which means you almost certainly aren't going to "fix" that bridge. What I would do is ask, "how would you like me to ...


56

Whether and how you wear it should depend on the situation. High-stakes business trip to Saudi Arabia? I'd say no. Working with your peers (who know you anyway) in the home office? Probably doesn't make a difference. Instead of trying to make a global yes/no decision, consider the circumstances. I, too, am Jewish but not obviously so (I'm Italian), and ...


55

Create a billable unit (some places use 6 minutes, some 10, some 15) - make sure that these clients are aware that a phone conversation or small task will be charged at the billable rate. Keep a record of each task/conversation and add up the units and hand over a monthly invoice. Yes, this means that three two minute tasks for three different customers ...


51

Client visits in which you aren't given an exact meeting time and agenda are not the time to "take full advantage of their presence to understand them as customers of our software product". These are generally meet and greet. They simply want to put a name/voice to a face, shake a few hands and ask, in general, how things are going. In short they are just ...


51

I am a techy but my father was a salesman and he would say once you give away product or services for free you have established your price. Establish a support contract. Bill in increments and round up.


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