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There's a mix of good and bad advice in the answers already, with few actionable items to work from, so I'll focus on what you can do right now and without spending any money, or as little as possible. Here's a list of sites that teach you coding for free. I have used some of them and I'm affiliated with exactly none of them. Learning: GitHub Get ...


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It's easier to teach a violinist to play bongos than the other way 'round Remember that anytime you worry about your coding abilities. Coding is a thing you do need to know how to do. But it is not terribly hard, especially since computers and languages were invented by mathematicians. So the mindsets inherent in programming should come naturally to ...


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I am a Data Scientist with a Mathematics Master's degree! I can share my own experience. Do Kaggle competitions!. Start with Titanic first, you can have a look at other people's code to give you ideas, write your own code and put it on your Github. Then you can try other competitions. This will give you experience on "real world" projects. There are not ...


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Frankly, a lot of job openings read like they want unicorns who somehow are fresh graduates that have mastered statistics, general coding, and database management. This isn’t as rare as you might think. A few online courses will give you all the general programming background you’ll need for an entry level data science job. Combine this with the statistics ...


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Two additional points: A lot of what professional programmers and Data Scientists do is interact with systems like Spark, Docker, Git, GitHub*, Power BI*, SQL Server*, Jupyter Notebooks, Azure*, AWS. Each of these is extremely popular and there's tons of free learning content on, even for the ones that are pure cloud services. And there's always a spot on ...


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The advantage you have over other candidates is your mathematics. Mathematicians can learn to code, but generally speaking computer science graduates mathematical ability is on a steep downward trajectory after graduation. I should know I am a physics and computer science major and can barely do math 30 years on from university now just doing commercial ...


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Start a project. Think of something you are interested in, that a code based solution would work well for (a simple noughts and crosses game, storing statistics of a D&D session, simulating rolling dice and reporting the results to a number of users etc etc etc) and then do it - put the code up on Github in a public repository, and learn. Improve the ...


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This: Due to my programming time at university, in a roundabout way, I've already learned. Does not align at all with this: If you gave me any FizzBuzz-like question, I would expect to fail it. Do you know where FizzBuzz came from? It is meant as a quick programming problem to screen out those who cannot code at all so that the interviewer doesn't ...


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Not to be rude, but if If you gave me any FizzBuzz-like question, I would expect to fail it. Then you can't code at all. The only thing fizzbuzz do is weed out candidates who cannot code. If you want reasonably respected coding qualification The only thing you can do is get mileage. And lots of it. Implement small webapps, small prototypes, write ...


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Having a degree in Mathematics is no trivial thing. A lot of people can code, but only a small minority of these people can easily translate a mathematical problem into code, and that is very often a crucial question in sectors like fintech and automotive. What's more, it's known that when someone studies Mathematics, one also has to get an experience in ...


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Speaking as somebody who has been a developer and a team leader in in this industry for a long time now... I don't care about your qualifications. At all. When I have your CV in front of me I care about your attention to detail with the CV (spelling, layout, font consistency), and I care about demonstrable relevant experience. By demonstrable relevant ...


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