103

I had the opportunity to work under a project manager who had an interesting approach to project ownership disputes: "When it's time to call the shots, it's better to have one average captain than two excellent ones." It seems like project ownership is really important to your co-worker. Why not treat it as an asset instead of a liability? Have your co-...


98

I were to commit fixes to spelling and grammar mistakes in code, and make no changes to the actual functionality of the code? Tread carefully here. Often, any code changes have down-stream effects. A code review might be required. Testing might be required. A security review might be required. Etc. Changing spelling and grammar mistakes might trigger a ...


89

When he makes a suggestion or criticism of your pull request, explain once why you aren't going to change it to match his suggestion. It should be simple and clear. For example: "That wouldn't significantly improve the code." "The effort to make that change isn't justified by its value." "The current method is simpler." If he still refuses to accept the ...


74

You allowed this person to be tested using a different tool. To me, that would mean that you wanted to evaluate the quality of the translation, not the format of the submission. Perhaps that person assumed the same and felt that her time was wasted. In any case, this person got angry dissatisfied with your recruiting process, and I don't think that ...


71

It's sad but true: people take the path of least resistance and effort needed. If the repeated requests are taking up your work time in a way that makes completing your own work difficult, please be firm and straight about it and push back. Say something like: "Hey listen, I understand you got this problem, but I have this other assignment which is ...


70

How to? You don't, their manager does. All you can do is factually point out where their bickering is causing your work to suffer. You should try to focus on the work aspect of this situation and not the personal stuff, and by that I mean person X is responsible for task number one, and you cannot do you part until person X does his. Again, focus on the ...


65

You should speak to the person: "Hey listen, I understand you got this problem, but I have this other assignment which is expected out of me. If you feel you are really stuck and can't progress without assistance, speak to your manager and they should be able to sort something out for you" If they keep bugging you, that's when you go to your own boss. ...


58

First step should be to talk with your manager. Explain to them what you have explained to us here and state your wish to get more programming work. Assuming that your manager agrees with your wish, ask them how long it will take them to transition your role fully back to programming (a transition period of one or two months seems reasonable to me, but you ...


56

I consider this kind of change an improvement in quality. Internal documentation has a value although it's not facing end-user, and improving the quality of it makes it more valuable. I also personally tend to trust documentation more if it doesn't have a huge amount of typos in it. Sometimes a typo or wrong grammar might also change the meaning or lead to ...


53

I was in a similar situation a few years back and this is what I have learned from it, though I am more of a server side developer. Productivity in software development should not be the sole criterion when deciding on software technology. It is actually software maintenance that matters much more. While some new software development technologies do ...


34

Is the new time inconvenient for you or your team members? If not, then you're making too much of a fuss about it. If the time is inconvenient, however, aside from not being consistent (convenience is more important than consistency, although I understand the comfort of consistent meetings) then you need to determine whether the presence of your boss or ...


27

Is it in your job description to determine what technology stack your company uses? If not, then you need to accept that it's not your job to change this aspect of the company. There are reasons why a company might choose to stick to the old technologies that it's already using - aversion to risk being the first one that comes to mind. That said you ...


23

Ask your manager what he or she wants you to do. Obviously helping out another team is going to take time, particularly if they have an ongoing set of problems. It's going to cut into whatever else you are working on. It's your manager's job to decide whether you should take that time or not. Talk to your manager, without bringing up the attitude of ...


20

If you're unhappy with your current responsibilities, and want to get back to what you were doing before, there are a few things you might consider: Talk with your manager. Express you desire to spend most of your time working on software. Ask for a way to transition your responsibilities to something like 80% programming, 20% other tasks. Talk with ...


19

Their reaction may have been over the top and hot-headed, but the important thing is that it was out of context. You have to pick one issue to respond to. I would probably go with something like: Oh my goodness, I know never to send something to a client that hasn't been tested. That should go without saying. I'm not sending this now, I'm just packaging ...


19

You're being set up for failure. It's not intentional, it's a by-product of poor project management and a lack of accountability. It's surprisingly common. Be vocal and visible. It is your responsibility for making sure that the project manager / lead understands what you need, and that you don't have it. When someone tells you they should be ready "maybe ...


18

You tested her and she failed, that’s it. Because she didn’t deliver what you needed, and because you can do without the drama. You can reply that the technical aspects created you lots of costly extra work (that should explain to her why it is important to you), and that you will not be using her services in the future. Or, you can go to your manager ...


17

"Sorry, I'm busy with task X" Don't elaborate. You want to keep the conversation firmly grounded in the current reality and avoid any comments that give credence to the idea that you might be in some way involved in their project (e.g. "I don't want to help this person who could use google" implies that you could or should help them). If you are later ...


16

Write down your question and release the exclusive lock. When your cohort is done hearing himself talk, read what you wrote down to jog your memory, and ask him the question.


16

Your so-called "architect" is ridiculous. Reviewing work in progress, unless requested by the person doing that work, is a waste of everyones time. My answer if someone wanted to review my work in progress (and there is nobody around me doing something stupid like that) would be to tell them "review all you want, I don't care because it's work in progress, ...


15

The disciplines in which he does posses a sliver of skill, we have someone on the team who can do a much better job in a shorter amount of time. Time to enhance your project management skills by changing your thinking. You seem to think that you must always have the most skilled person in each discipline exclusively work that task. That's simply not ...


14

Assume the worst of your changes: You make mistakes that breaks something Your relatively minor commits might clutter changelogs etc Your employer might think your time is spent doing more useful things Due to this, I only make "unsolicited" changes if, basically, I was changing the code/document anyway. So if I'm being tasked changing some class, and I ...


13

Nothing wrong with asking questions unless they're such that it shows you have made little or no attempt to work out the answer for yourself first. Use whatever resources are available to you to do a bit of research on issues yourself before bugging someone else. They will notice and appreciate it. Question A (annoying) "I couldn't login, do you think it's ...


13

I would pull in a manager and tell him that the constant arguments are impairing efficiency. This is something he has to sort out. If it were me I would try to split the project. Trying to find a interface and give each one his own part to manage. Maybe you can suggest that.


13

You are playing well above your pay grade. Let your manager manage your colleague. An outcome like "the project got finished but wasn't great, one of the interns worked hard but the other was a nightmare" is common as dirt in this industry. Do the tasks your manager has assigned to you. When you're out of tasks, go ask for more. When you can't do something ...


12

Sounds like the architect has way too much time on his hands. When people make worthless, editorial comments about my code I ignore them or perhaps respond with a perfunctory: "Thanks for the great ideas!", then delete their email. I suggest you do the same. Life is too short to worry about stuff that is non-productive like that.


12

is it reasonable for me to expect my contribution to at least be acknowledged In my experience, it not unreasonable to expect some sort of acknowledgement, but it is also not uncommon for a document to be presented as "prepared by the department", without an individuals name as the author. I would say in this case since you have an email to back up the ...


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