146

Sounds like a networking event - and given you were "invited" through the company e-mail it sounds as if you'd be attending as a representative of the company. Especially given the questions asked. Best course of action in that case is to discuss it with your manager to see if this is something the company sees as being potentially beneficial. If so the ...


143

These types of events are usually nothing more than a sales pitch by a vendor to get your company to buy its products or use its services. Before you unilaterally decide to register and attend you need to find out your company policy on gifts. Depending where you work, a free dinner can be considered a gift and you need to understand your company's policy ...


91

This isn't a problem. I cannot imagine anyone caring. You had the same employer, same job title. Just worked in a different "office" and under a different supervisor. Unless you wanted to highlight having more jobs or the difference between the jobs, merging them makes perfect sense and declutters your resume. It doesn't matter if it is a new contract ...


87

Was my response an overreaction, how else could I have got my point across? Quoting from your post: Honestly, I was irritated by him questioning the completely reasonable and simple request - although I also realize that he was attempting to gain more context to the reasoning behind the request. I think that, as this person was an intern (that is, he/...


61

These rules were not being strictly enforced and we became lax with keeping our safety glasses on. Your intern reacted confused, because suddenly the informal rule you all followed (that PPE gear is optional) was no longer the rule to follow; instead now the real rule was to be followed. As for what you could have done differently: You could have explained ...


42

The way you mentioned it, I read it as an honest mistake where you missed to clarify the job details, it should not be a deal breaker for you. Unless there was an explicit criteria that you matched by mistakenly combining the job details - I do not see this to be a problem. You can do two (both) things: Update the resume with the correct details and send a ...


32

You asked a few related questions: I would like to attend the event (is it real?) Of course, none of us can literally tell you if it's real or not, but the scheme is somewhat common. Typically, these sort of "networking" sessions are set up with a hook (free food!) and are a thin veil for a marketing firm or vendor to try to get a captive audience so ...


25

These rules were not being strictly enforced and we became lax with keeping our safety glasses on. That means that experienced employees, including you, were lax about wearing the safety equipment. The following day; I met this intern for breakfast at the hotel as usual. I asked him to ensure he had his safety glasses with him and was wearing them ...


24

It's fantastic that you want to come up with ways to handle that sort of thing better in the future. I think there are both proactive and reactive things you might have approached slightly differently. (It's always easier when you're not in the moment, of course!) You can still go back and do them retoactively now. Proactive Instead of just saying to ...


20

I think this a bit more serious than you understand. Let me try to give you an analogy. You're a cook in a large kitchen. Every once in awhile, you can't cook potatoes because the oven doesn't work - and you just found out that the reason is because another chef is tinkering around the electric transformer for the city block during their breaks. ...


18

When I explained the mistake, he angrily yelled at me and said "If you use a comma delimited string as a SQL parameter on the website again, I will beat you senseless" This also makes me sad and angry. A teachable moment between you and the senior developer that was completely wasted. No mistake deserves this kind of treatment. It's completely ...


17

Whenever you are in a situation where sh*t has hit the fan and people are asking questions, just be factual. When they ask what happened, say that the server failed. When they ask if you knew it was going to fail, say yes. When they ask if you did anything to prevent it, say yes. When they ask what you did to prevent it, show your papertrail/suggestions, ...


16

What should I do? If you are not comfortable with him putting the Bear there, I suggest you approach him and tell him about it. Try in his office, or wherever you seem fit, and ask for a quick private talk. Express to him that the gift was intended for him as an apology, and that it is embarrassing for you that it is displayed in front of everybody. Any ...


16

There will be many more instances in your work life where peers or people you have no authority over are doing something that goes against company policy or your own ethics. Here is some general advice: If what they are doing does not affect your job and is not causing imminent and serious danger, then let it go. They have managers, and that is the ...


14

Been there. Done that. First of all, remember that your entire company has one purpose which is to sell your product(s)/service(s). If your company is not selling (at a profit) it ceases to be a company and everyone does not have a job. That being said, what you've got going on is very frustrating (I've been in your place). Sales making promises ...


14

I don't think he was questioning the appropriateness of your instructions. It sounds to me like he may have been scared, not just resistant. As you said, your team does has not been diligent in observing safety protocols, which suggests that you generally don't consider the job too dangerous. The PPE rules seem like arbitrary guidelines, but your normal ...


13

Sounds very fishy. In our company, if we'd get something like that, we'd treat it as a security incident unless it were from a known source and sent to people known to be outside contacts with that source (e.g. sales for customer or sales events, senior developers for things like OracleOne, etc. etc.), and report it to our security manager as such, who'd ...


13

A general rule is: Don't go to your boss with problems, go to him or her with solutions. [1] Saying "this is a bad idea, if we do it we'll be sorry in a year" isn't helpful. What you need to do is to come up with an alternative plan that avoids the problem while also accomplishing the goals of the problematic one. In your case I assume it would be some ...


13

Just stay factual, do not put blame on anyone. Report what happend: you cannot make your deadlines, because the WLAN breaks down too often. Make sure you have recorded when this happens and why that's a problem for you. Then let whoever's job it is take the problem from there. Maybe your coworker will be found out. Maybe they'll stop if they know somebody ...


12

This kind of free-thought ambiguity isn't uncommon. What you can do to combat this is read the content twice over and try to gain some kind of sense from it, and then repeat back your interpretation. Many thanks for the response, I'll assume that you're free on Friday, I'll set up a meeting accordingly. Basically, summarize as clearly and concisely as ...


12

You did the right thing to insist your colleague wears appropriate PPE. It's disappointing to hear that not everyone is taking PPE requirements seriously, but a lack of adherence doesn't diminish the importance of proper PPE. Consider taking time to explain your thinking and concern with your colleague. Regardless of his or her status as an intern, he/she ...


12

Do I need to be concerned that my manager somehow knew I was looking to leave? No you need not. At this point it's not relevant if they somehow found out about that, as you already got the raise. It could have been, perhaps, that they felt you a bit demotivated and that inspired them to give you a raise. If they really value me so much, WHY would a ...


11

How should I proceed in this situation? Start asking the boss questions again. It is better to have a problem of asking too many questions instead of having the problem of not asking any questions. If you feel that the boss could help by answering a question then you should at least ask the question. Remember that asking questions is never pointless ...


10

The raise was reflected on my salary on the next pay but the remote work wasn't. How do you know it has not been reflected? The perk entitles you to have the facility, but does not impose that on you. In other words, no one is going to come to you and ask which day you want to avail WFH facility. Just like no one asks you to use the coffee machine next to ...


10

I think your company is testing your resistance to social engineering attacks. Forward the letter to your IT security department, and think about how this set of answers would let an outsider start to play a game that would compromise your security further. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Social_engineering_(security)


8

I have all of this fully documented. The phone call would be an undocumented part. I feel they have acted dishonestly and might lie saying I agreed to something I didn't agree to over the phone. I say you take the call and accept any apologies and payments they want to give. For the apologies you don't need to have it in writing. However, if they are ...


8

I resolved this problem in two ways: I got a dual sim phone (but a second phone would work) with the cheapest plan I could find (approx £6/month for 200 minutes of calls which is more than enough). I use this number exclusively for recruitment. I set my voicemail message to explain my situation. In my case, I am a contractor, so when I am in a contract, my ...


7

I'm going to give a bit of an ugly answer: You don't know what your primary function is Your beef isn't with the Sales Department. Let me explain what I mean by that. You mention that you keep getting pulled from your "primary function", and that your CEO and CTO are fine with this. Well... no. If the CEO and CTO are both saying they want you to spend ...


7

Unfortunately "lack of communication skills" is a broad term. Usually means that you cannot communicate with your peers to effectively perform your duties. Might be related to the fact that English is your second language or could be due to you being introvert or could be they are looking for an excuse to end your internship and are going to use such hardly ...


7

What's a nice, diplomatic way to end this without burning bridges or making myself look bad? A simple statement, something like the one below, should do the trick: Thank you Mr. XYZ for the job opportunity you presented to me. However, because of some changes in my life, I am temporarily not looking for a new job any more. Maybe we shall have the ...


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