132

I used to work for a very large US based company that used to pride itself in having a very large number of Engineers. It would constantly boast about the large numbers and how technically excellent it was - this was to the outside world. Internally there were regular town hall meetings that were delivered on various levels - Corporate, Business unit, ...


103

Sometimes it's a cultural thing. Some people think it is rude to contradict people, even when they disagree. So they prefix their disagreement with supportive statements of agreement because that's the appropriate approach in regards to their cultural context. Stephen Fry has a piece contrasting US and British dinner parties. If someone at a British dinner ...


77

Is a public “shoutouts” channel a good or bad idea? It's a bad idea. A terrible one. Same as "employee of the month", for the reasons you yourself have mentioned. I've had personal experience with these in small companies, and most of the time the wrong (or popular) employees get the credit, and the hard working ones go unnoticed. This leads to ...


31

Agreeing without really agreeing can have a variety of causes. There are just those who just misunderstood what the other person was saying and thought they were agreeing to something else. There are those who are agreeing because they aren't paying attention and need to say something. Been there and done that. There are those who are agreeing because ...


19

They are heavily superstitious folks and based many if not all decisions from advises by psychic, shaman, medium of sort. Run away as fast as you can to somewhere which isn't run by idiots. This business will fail, it's just a question of whether it's today, tomorrow, next month or next year.


19

The fact that you can't read cursive is gonna be hard to hide so might as well just be up front about it and get the discomfort out of the way. If you disclose it yourself then that gives you more control of the narrative than if they find out. As for whether or not you should be embarrassed... some schools (in the United States) don't even teach cursive ...


17

Dealing with a bad performance review is unpleasant but simple & straight forward Don't argue. It's pointless. This IS the perception of your manager, whether you like it or not Ask your manager for help and how to improve. Create an actionable plan with quantitative metrics that you both agree on. Then track the plan preferably in weekly one-on-one ...


15

Although I haven't worked anywhere that does public-shut-outs via Slack, I have worked at companies which didn't publicly acknowledge success, companies which did acknowledge success in a not particular fair way, and a company which did it in (I think) a fair way. When there was no public acknowledgment of success, I didn't feel particularly engaged with the ...


15

Are there any other strategies I can use to convince people to use and contribute to these docs? Or is it just time to give up so that once I leave, they'll finally realize it's now their problem? Let it go. While it is admirable that you would want to prepare your coworkers for your departure, this is not your responsibility. It is your manager's ...


13

Find phone number of the most HR-like contact you have at your new employer. 1a. If you don't have a number, use the main number listed on their website. Phone said number. Explain that you're starting on Monday but haven't heard any details. Respond appropriately to any questions you're asked. Most likely, you've either slipped through a crack somewhere or ...


11

It really depends on the culture that has been created within the company/company unit, end goals, the importance of said topic to the big picture, the perceived rank/skillsets of the people involved in the meeting, and the comfort of the individuals involved with the others around and/or public speaking. Typically Shy people are going to agree and avoid ...


11

From your question I can see the main cause of both problems you face. You're overly verbose when communicating. You could have cut this question in half and still had too much. If this is the style your manager and colleague are seeing I'm not surprised the latter doesn't want to assist you and the former has lost interest. Some people have little patience ...


11

My employer does something similar. It is called "Partner Points"; it is run by Achievers. Each month, every employee is given 500 points to award to any other employee they wish, publicly. Points accumulate over time and can be redeemed for various goods (think of a credit card rewards program). The employer, of course, pays monthly for the ...


11

A manager one time was passing on a bit of wisdom to me. If they ask me to saw this table in half, and will not give me a saw, but only this pen, I'll do it, but I will be very clear about how long it will take me. If they're good with that, then I'll get going. Explain the limitations, ask for accommodation. Be concise, precise, and detailed. Quantify, ...


9

Totally agreed with Phillip Kendall that you should run away. However, I'd like to add one thing. It sounds like you're at the start of this business and right now money is good because the owner probably has a lot saved up/borrowed. At some point, it's going to dry up and you'll be stuck looking for a job. My thought is you should stick around until at ...


9

Since you're looking for actual evidence, I'd suggest you look at books written or inspired by Edwards Deming, the father of just-in-time manufacturing He found that individual incentives had potentially negative effects within organizations. Instead, he emphasized collective incentives or team incentives, over individual incentives. For instance at Toyota, ...


9

I think I'm guilty of doing this. For instance, if someone just made a proposal that I mostly disagree with. Instead of starting my rebuttal by saying, "I disagree, I think we should...", which might completely shut down the other person who just made the proposal. I will usually try to find a part of the proposal I can agree with and start with ...


8

do you think it would be okay if I tell the teacher my problem, and ask her to assign these specific assignments to someone else? Whenever you are unable to perform (or have extreme difficulty with) any regular work assignments, you must tell your boss. Preferably this happens before you get a job offer, but it's never too late. Should I be embarrassed (...


7

Generally the aim is to do it when people are already interrupted for some reason. After a meeting, or when getting ready to go to a meeting, after lunch, or just before lunch, or just starting the day, or just after the end of the day. Note that people may be busy around those times too. If you know Bob has to leave at exactly closing time to pick up his ...


6

I didn't mention it during the interview that I was actually applying for a different position. Why not? You should have done this right there, so you don't waste your time in an interview for a position you don't want. Guess that this is something you should keep in mind for future interviews. Would it be wise explain the situation in my follow-up email ...


6

In addition to the already good answers provided, I would like to cover the scenario where you don't manage to get ANY answer before Monday. It seems obvious but in that case, certainly don't stay at home waiting for an answer, choose one of both offices, and go there. 4 possibilities here: You're in the right office. Nice! You're in the wrong office. Too ...


6

When dealing with people who are not rational, you have to consider "what is the most irrational thing that could possibly happen here?". To which the answer is more or less limitless, so you have to account for that. Let's say the company gets off the ground and is making some small amount of money, enough to pay the bills but not much more than ...


6

I thought back to my time as a cog in a Fortune-500 company and this set off "it's a trap!". It's for fun now, but at some point management will decide to count shout-outs and include that on performance reviews. My paranoid co-workers would have immediately arranged an informal mutual shout-out network -- "you guys are so willing to help I'm ...


6

Perhaps those tickets are not for you? And thus why you are not getting them? Anyways, it would be ok to ask for clarification in a polite and professional way to the Dispatcher. A phrasing I can think of is (working a bit from your thoughts): Hey [name of dispatcher], I've noticed that you mentioned all the team members on this last ticket, except me. I'm ...


5

Management should be open and transparent to an employee about his/her performance, and relate praise when it has been given/deserved. When an employee does well, others should message that employee directly and/or message that employee's manager. In an ideal world managers would have full insight into everything their employees are doing, good and bad. ...


5

I'm really going to ignore the glaring question if competing teams within the same organisation makes sense. The teams may be competing within the organisation for that client, but once upper management decides to go with one project, you all need to work together to deliver. There is no time to feel like a loser, or hard done by. I get that your manager ...


4

Most startups fail, particularly those with innovative and creative ownership or payment strategies instead of innovative and creative products. Owners like this are best avoided altogether.


4

I would agree with your points that it may have unintended effects for the employees, and potentially even bring liability to the company if there's ever a complaint about management favoring one employee or discriminating against others. By announcing your support of a given employee's performance publicly, you're putting out public data that can be counted ...


4

I would argue the damage is done It is very hard to change their minds once they have made them up. "Reasons" seem like "excuses" and the comments being quite general and opinion based rather than concrete with clear examples of error point to someone who is not all that evidence driven anyway. It doesn't help that you are not the ...


4

I'm going to go against the grain here and say I have had good experiences with public callouts. I think giving genuine thanks does create a positive workplace culture. However if you are currently in a workplace culture where you keep your head down unless the boss comes to yell at you, it could be a bit of a culture shock. Here are a few examples from my ...


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