119

My wife bought a camera at a local camera store just yesterday. I would have researched cameras online and ordered one from Amazon. Her experience was amazing. The owner of the store asked her lots of questions about how she intended to use the camera and what mattered and didn't matter to her. He walked her through several cameras and showed her what ...


114

is it poor office etiquette to display/mention signs of "relative" wealth when I know others are struggling? Given that you are not doing it with the intention to brag or boast (it comes up naturally in a conversation), then it's ok. Sometimes, people can take naive or honest things one says the wrong way, but there is few to nothing you can do to ...


38

Next time this happens, I would let your manager know beforehand. It's not a good idea to not show up for work and then suddenly have an excuse as you arrive for work. That will cause suspicion. If you contact your manager and explain that you're going to be late for work due to "personal obligations", that would be a good reason. Saying "personal ...


37

The key to maintaining professionalism is keeping the details out of it. I'm looking for a newer car (about 3-4 years old; mine is 11 years old) which some of my peers would perceive as a luxury (I'm not going to ask them anything about cars, but it will be seen when I buy it and arrive in the car park). There is nothing you can do about it, ...


28

Yes, this is very OK. If you have any questions about the post, it is better to ask for more information than submit an application and it ended up being a waste of yours and the recruiter's time. As an expat working in the Netherlands, I'd just add a point of caution: make sure that the information you're asking for clarification is indeed not written in ...


27

You need to offer a shopping experience that Amazon or Walmart don't and that's valuable and tailored to your specific customers. You can't compete on price or variety so it has to be quality of the experience & service and/or the curation and quality or your goods. You need to create a clear identity of what you are and what you are not and then ...


21

We have a very chatty environment where it's the norm to share a lot of personal information, so I hear a lot about my peers' children, schools, financial troubles etc. Some of my peers are 'working poor' who have full time jobs but are still struggling financially, in some cases claiming welfare benefits. My background is similar to yours. I've ...


20

If an employer provides contact information, it's done with the expectation that you may want to contact them. And, given the example questions you've posted, it seems like you have a legitimate need to contact them - these are typical questions that a candidate may want to clear with HR prior to applying for a job, and if the answers aren't specified in the ...


17

GeorgeX, I worked about 40 years in a variety of organizations, with a spectrum of personalities, before I retired. I performed several times as the young colleague, and also as the experienced old one. You have my sympathy. A young colleague's excessively clear understanding of his or her importance can be thoroughly annoying. It's important to bring it up ...


15

If you are based in any of the countries you mentioned in your question the only way you can avoid shaking hands with women is to avoid shaking hands with everyone regardless of gender. Treating people differently based on gender is discrimination and whilst small hand shaking could be perceived this way. I’m not sure how your culture handles trans or any ...


14

First of all, what not to do: Don't go to your team members and announce: I don't want you to bring me problems, I want you to bring solutions. Unfortunately, I have seen that from managers before and the effect it has is to give the impressions that you don't care and people might give up. Junior members are junior and often lack the experience to come up ...


14

What to do when employer lied about when they would reimburse for out of pocket expense? I don't think this situation constitutes a lie, in first place. The reimbursement request is not dismissed, it's postponed (for some reason). Given that you already have a written confirmation for the reimbursement, combined with the amount (relatively small), I won't ...


12

I've been on both sides of that spectrum. Some years ago I broke by back, lost my job, my house, my car, etc. I've slowly built my life back up, but I'm not there yet. For the past 2½ years, I've lived off about $5000 and work-for-rent. It isn't your fault my life sucks. You don't owe me anything. If I got offended or upset by every person who had ...


10

I usually would recommend taking a PTO day if you're interviewing, going over a lunch break, or going during the day and letting your manager know in advance that you need to be out for X hours - If you need an excuse for why, I don't necessarily think there's much harm in saying something like a dentist appointment or needing to be there for the cable guy ...


9

Sometimes doing something will make the situation worse. If your TL has indicated that he has dealt with it, you should trust him, as you appear to do so. You don't know what's going on in the guys head. There could be work pressures, personal life pressures etc. In addition, nobody likes their team being "told off" despite how delicately you may have ...


9

It's certainly possible that you are reading the situation correctly, your colleague is intentionally being highly offensive to you, and you need to stand up for yourself. Based on your question history, though, I would tend to suspect that it's a cultural miscommunication or the result of some other source of stress. Yesterday, you thought you were being ...


9

There is no easy fix for this situation. Here are a few things you can try Establish clear cut rules and deadlines. e.g. the deadline for bringing in new idea's is say 1 day before presenting to the client. Do no entertain any request after the deadline, even if its better than before. Have an open discussion with the trouble making team member and let him ...


9

As a former IT contractor (25+ years in the game) I used to get rather irritated by people who thought they knew better than me based on less experience. I frequently had at least a decade's worth of experience more than the line manager to back up my design decisions. The people that I had time for were the ones who came to me to ask for explanations, put ...


9

It definitely depends on the type of shop. Strategies for a store that sells digital cameras would probably differ significantly from strategies for a store that sells gourmet meats and cheeses. In general, though, I think the best strategy is to create a positive customer experience from the moment they walk in until the moment they leave and charging for ...


8

I don't know how comfortable you are with this idea, but it may be that you will need to sit down with your coworker and tell him "I want you to know I really appreciated all the help that you have given me with (XYZ technology) on the tracker. I've got it working now and everything is cool and I just wanted you to know that so you don't have to spend so ...


8

Rule of thumb: When in doubt, always ask. The company (if a sensible one) will appreciate your efforts for calling them to confirm the eligibility, which saves a lot of time and effort for both the sides. If I get a negative response / vibe for calling a prospective employer up for legitimate reasons, I'll think twice to even make an application.


7

It's probably best to assume that you're colleagues had no bad intentions. This may or may not be the case, but it seems best to give them some credit. As Patricia Shanahan pointed out in the comments, it may well be that the other person asked them proactively. My suggestion is not to focus on the missed project in the past, but try to become part of the ...


7

Good answers already, my addition would be showing relative wealth should not be dictated by others. If you have nice things you're not obligated to hide them because others don't. And it's good for your career to be well groomed and look successful. I wear a lot of gold, import silk shirts from Thailand and have my own car. Most people here have none of ...


7

The state of project is not really relevant here. The points you need to consider here are: Are you satisfied with the work and compensation here? Do you see value in the work you do? Is you work/effort valued? Did you try to talk / discuss the scenario/ situation you're currently in with higher-ups and received no positive sign? If the answers of first ...


6

Let him play the TL. There is nothing wrong with letting Tom act as team lead, and it might be just what Anne wants. There might be two reasons why Tom acts this way: 1.) Anne sees a need for a TL for your group and decided to groom Tom for this position. It is quite common to let people be an acting team lead before officially promoting someone. The fact ...


5

If we take your situation and imagine it took place in the 'workplace' rather than in an academic setting, the solution to this problem is rather simple: The manager meets with the problematic employee, explains how he expects the members of the team to act and behave, provides the examples above where the problematic employee didn't act as he should, and ...


5

Most of what you've stated is subjective, meaning it's your opinion and not empirical evidence or undisputed fact. If you think the contractors methods aren't sound then you'll need top prove that with factual evidence and examples. Why are there methods unsound? What methods are better? What data can you show to prove that? The contractors are more ...


5

At work, in many cultures including the regions you mentioned in your question, you should treat men and women the same. Specifically, if you don't shake hands with women, do not shake hands with men, but it extends to all interactions. Pick some non-contact greeting gesture. One person I know who does not shake hands puts her palms together, fingers up, ...


5

What's a good way to foster an environment where colleagues feel free to express their opinions, if I'm not in a management role? This responsibility, to participate in a collective spirit, falls on the entire team. I think you definitely should on occasion ask, when met with silence, say something similar to: "Hey person XXXXX, what are your thoughts ...


5

It's hard to unravel the social aspects of your question, but I think that's as much because of how you are personally mixing the social and professional aspects as it is a sign that the two are actually interwoven. In other words, don't get hung up on social skills as a way to create trust. In fact, trust created purely by way of social prowess is probably ...


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