334

It is rude of people to attach themselves to a lunch party without being invited. Lunch is not work time, and people can spend it how they want. On the other hand you have identified an issue, that other people in the office want to do lunch with colleagues, and they aren't getting the opportunity, and it would be good for the workplace if you do something ...


111

I do not see a problem here. You found a bug, [100~105 case] reported it and provided the fix. After some time, you found another bug [105~107 one] (and probably the way to fix it, too). One can say, it should have been caught earlier, but nevertheless, you are the one who actually found this bug out and providing a solution. Until and unless you are ...


91

For at least a few lunches, pick a restaurant that is busy but takes lunch reservations. Reserve, in advance, a table for just the number in your group. "I'm sorry, we only have a table for 6 people.". As well as being an immediate excuse for not adding to your group, it conveys the information that it is a specific group planning to have lunch together, ...


90

People who make sloppy assumptions have only themselves to blame Putting "dropped out" or "incomplete" beside your education would be like putting "terminated" beside past jobs where your contract was not renewed or you got fired. Nobody would advise doing that. Employers would love to know if you have a criminal record, but nobody would advise putting "...


76

You don't lose credibility by admitting your mistakes, you lose it by trying to hide them. In your particular case, your calculator was conservative in calculating weight tolerance, which only increases the margin of safety, so as you said, no harm done. The fact that you spotted the error yourself, and corrected your error is something to be proud of, ...


72

In my opinion, this is a one-off case, and the chances of this incident being repeated is slim (though, it exists). However, don't start to think negatively about this. You seem to appear as a very strong-willed person - not everyone can do what you did and achieve what you're achieved - thank you. Now, coming to the question you asked: What to do when ...


55

The problem: For some reason, there are people joining us without being invited. That really isn't the problem. The problem is that you are trying to have a clique in a bigger sphere of people - a workplace. In workplaces, the idea of cliquing is rarely positive as it leads to suspicion about company decisions, and feelings of being excluded for those "...


37

I know how you feel. You want a small group for lunch. It is easier to coordinate, it is easier to talk, it is easier to find a table, it is more efficient. My experience when getting a group together for lunch is they pick a place in the building to meet, and the longer they take at that central visible location, the more likely they are to be spotted. ...


32

This is somewhat location specific, but also depends on what you refer to as "Course". If you are referring to a class you took at an institute, like: CS 101, University of Stack Exchange, 2019-2021 then no this would not be lying at all. If you are referring to a degree program, such as: Bachelor of Science, University of Stack Exchange, 2019-...


25

is my resume misleading? Let me ask another question: Why are you not simply marking the education entry as "not completed"? That would remove all ambiguity. But unless you haven't thought of this option, maybe this ambiguity is strategic. You can foresee that this, potentially, may give the false impression that you completed the education. This is, by ...


20

The easiest solution is to pack lunches and go somewhere that doesn't serve food for lunch. Anything else requires subterfuge or insulting people. This way people may follow but they'll soon leave looking for food unless they are committed and pack their own lunch. In which case befriend them. The other very common solution is to choose places with fixed ...


18

As others have said, it seems like you've found a pre-existing bug and fixed it. I'd be delighted if a member of my team did this. For extra credit, try to figure out how you can change your process to stop this type of thing from slipping through the net in the future: Do you have unit tests? What are your code coverage stats like? Is there a test ...


14

Although I agree wholeheartedly with @Tymoteusz, I'm not sure he answers your questions - so I will attempt to. It's going to depend on the surrounding environment. If you're in the workplace cafeteria, for example, you will struggle to "get away from" those others. Same goes for if there is only 1 good restaurant nearby! Someone in the comments suggested ...


13

I would advise not doing so, at least not publicly. It might make you feel better but it only makes you look negative. Basically it would look like you're whinging about them not hiring you. (I am not saying you are but that's how it might look) Would hitting back really make you feel better? I would suggest trying to view it as a positive. You put time ...


12

What do I do? Do I just tell them to stop calling and take me off their list? Yes, that's exactly what you do with someone when you no longer want them to call.


12

My question is how should I approach my manager about this or even if I should? I suggest you approach your manager, in private, and try the following: Hello, manager. Last time I heard the product being described in a way I am not familiar with, and also mentioned some other features the product does not currently have. I feel like I am ...


11

Speaking as a software developer with over 7 years of professional experience, +25 years total programming experience, and several years in college learning situations, making errors is common and generally don't reduce your reputation. Every software developer in the world has made mistakes. Linus Torvalds, the originator of Linux, makes mistakes. ...


11

Did I Lie on my resume? Yes, No, Maybe. The actual question you should be asking is: Was the information I provided in my CV is easily understood? The answer is : No. CV is not the place to create or leave room for confusion / misunderstanding / interpretation. You should be as precise and correct as possible. I list them in the following format: ...


10

It clearly shows I only studied there for 2 years, not enough to qualify for a degree. That sounds a lot like "not lying" to me. Your resume is clearly slanted in your favor, but that's normal. A better question to ask is "if your employer later discovers that you don't have a degree, will that be a problem?" As long as you're clearly doing your job ...


10

Not to be flippant, but the way to handle this is by getting a new job and quitting. Pay being consistently late is a pretty big red flag.


9

Say something like "Remember that bug that I fixed x months ago? Well, I discovered a similar bug in other parts of our code base. This bug was working in our favor, so no one has been hurt by it. However, a bug is a bug, so I'll be rolling out a fix shortly."


8

So, you are finding and correcting mistakes in code that was written 10 years ago, ie 8 years prior to you joining the company. These are not your fault. So, just report the corrections so that all can be aware of them. One point does come to mind - there could be other parts of the code that now report incorrect values as the "tolerance" from those errors ...


8

Discuss this with your manager. Just ask your manager to help out on the training matter. Make it clear that you can perform the additional tasks, but not without training. It is your manager's job to manage your time and help look out for your career. Proceed cautiously and try to stay calm about it. Why is Manager A doing that? Hard to know for sure, ...


8

Behavior Therapy First, you should start with DJClayworth's excellent answer. The basic problem is that your coworkers aren't comfortable with organizing their own lunch, or your group is considered the coolest kids in the company. Either way, your group has become the "nucleation site" for the formation of group lunches, but you can probably help them ...


8

Having occasionally had to do development on airgapped computers at a defense company, I'd say no. The hassle from not getting the occasional high priority message as quickly and the round about data transfer methods needed whenever I did need to move (permissible) data from one to the next was far more painful than the lower distraction rate. Besides ...


7

Today my boss, who is also the owner, contacted me and told me that my working hours will be changed to 12PM to 9PM and this is final. He may think it's final, but it's a negotiation. One outcome is that you completely give him what he wants. The other is that you completely refuse (and he probably fires you). But it's possible that you can find an ...


7

Wait for your coworkers to go to lunch first. Then you and your friends can go after they leave. If they invite you, simply say no thank you. (Although, I personally believe you should remain welcoming to your coworkers.)


7

If they don't ask, don't tell. If they do ask, just say yes or no. Mentioning it off-hand like you have looks kinda cheap/desperate; there is no reasonable method to verify your claim, and in all honesty, it's not necessarily a good claim; You could be 'being considered by Amazon' as a warehouse worker or because every other techie in your area won't touch ...


7

You don't have to consciously try to slow down. What you have to do is interact with the people you are talking to, instead of just talking. As you make points in your talk, look at the listeners. Look at their reactions. If they aren't reacting, pause and wait for some response: a nod, a question, etc. By doing this you'll learn to deliver ...


7

Stop telling him where you're going. He doesn't need to know that. You just need a vacation. That's it. If he asks, say that you haven't decided on all the particulars yet. That being said, don't make him any promise either. Your vacation is your vacation. You won't be available by phone, or by email. If he wants to play hardball and not even acknowledge ...


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