New answers tagged

7

Here are some options for you Create a fake account for the group. It is public right, so anyone can basically join with ease? Just make a new account to do this with. Send an email to the HR person asking if they can add your friend to their list of people to hire. Let the HR recruiter at your company in on the scheme. Maybe they know somewhere your ...


13

At the end of your post, add something like "I have keeping an eye out for a suitable position with my employer for them, but they don't match our current openings so I'd like to help them find a good position elsewhere." That both expresses your loyalty to your employer and to your friend.


3

I am on the other side of the coin and converse with many developers who are also not English speaking as the primary language. I find two main types of results from these conversations: 1) The developer says outright that they did not understand, don't get it, and sometimes try and paraphrase what they did understand. and 2) they say yes yes yes, go away ...


4

Exposure is your best avenue. I'm a developer in the american midwest - for a long time, we didn't really have a large minority population or a lot of 1st/2nd generation immigrants. My exposure to different accents was pretty limited growing up, and generally limited to east-asian during college. Because of that, when I first started interacting with ...


2

The proper grammatical use of ellipses is not really relevant here. You are asking if use of ellipses is generally intended as, or interpreted as, dismissive or rude. The answer is no, it is not, and there is no point in taking offense at it. In any workplace there are people that use lots of exclamation points, or ellipses, or "scare quotes", or Weird ...


0

There is another, perfectly acceptable, use for the ellipsis. It's to continue a sentence which is broken up by a citation. Example: I wish to draw attention to page 1, sub-paragraph 1, of the contract which states that... [rule 1] Do not talk about Fight Club ... and I therefore feel any further verbal conversation should cease forthwith.


2

It's possible that there's gender issues at play here that you might not be aware of. You mention in the comments that you're a transmale, so it's possible you may not be aware of certain gender dynamics that cismales grow up understanding. In particular, there are many women who are simply afraid of men, especially angry men. When you had your "small tiff",...


1

I would say there isn't a hard and fast rule — an ellipsis can be safe enough in some situations but not others. The key question is, are you being clear with your tone and is the omitted information completely irrelevant? When you end a sentence with "...", imagine you have replaced with the phrase "there is more, but I won't go into it here". In some ...


1

It may or may not get her fired but it's almost certain to make it works and it's damn sure not going to help resolve her situaion, which is undeniably extremely unpleasant. I can sympathize, I really can - I've been there where I'd have liked nothing more than to ride in like the wrath of god and lay down some harsh words on someone mistreating loved one ...


12

Just to add a different perspective - in some cultural contexts, ellipses can be perceived as less rude than periods as the latter could imply curtness or sternness, while the former implies the speaker is making an open-ended suggestion. I have found this to be the case with some (especially older or less technologically savvy) colleagues in some ...


19

Ellipses are perfectly fine if used correctly. If you intend to indicate that you're skipping a bit of verbiage, especially when quoting a speech or a technical reference, they're perfectly acceptable. For example, if you wanted to point out that there are six different date formats in ISO 8601, and you want to quote the W3c, their page says this: ...


44

I disagree with the conclusion reached in most of the answers provided so far. Is the use of ellipsis commonly considered to be unprofessional? Should I ban the three dots from my business communication? In my opinion, this is a matter of context. Yes, ellipsis just stuck at the end of a sentence, can be an implied rude or unprofessional comment. ...


9

Short answer: YOU ABSOLUTELY can get her fired Longer answer. Say nothing, as any action you can take will only hurt your mother. Putting on evil, bullying manager hat If I were a bullying manager, and I was calling someone "useless", and her son came up and said something to me, I'd think even less of her. I might fire her outright, by noting ...


3

I honestly don't know what to do but I'm immensely worried. Any issue that your mother is having is between her and her boss. If she feels that he is being demeaning, she can and should be able to speak up for herself. If the boss continues his behavior, she can and should escalate through the appropriate channels within her company. You can speak with ...


20

So if I was to talk to her boss and tell him that he is seriously messing with her mental health (which she has a bad history with and I'm scared this is going to push her over) would I potentially get her fired? Yes, you could. Whether she would be fired over this depends on location / culture / how much of an arse the boss is, but it certainly strikes me ...


-2

Look for another place to work. From what you wrote your colleague is trying to get you fired and manipulating the workplace's social environment with emotional displays harassing you. The boss won't fire her because she is, for all that matters, a protected minority: if she is fired she will sue for harassment and will win. I don't care if she has some ...


6

It depends on context. In the examples you give the ellipsis certainly could be taken in a rude or dismissive manner. It would be best to avoid using one in those situations. Those examples don't cover all cases. One might see something like: Our clients include Megacorp, Very Big Company, Large Charity, ... or: The research showed that several ...


0

So the solution for me now is to not interact with her, no confronting, and pretty much just.. not exist. I don't think that's a good idea. This is what I tried when I was in a similar position and in the end I ended up leaving the company because things just got worse. I would suggest to either try to figure things out between you two ASAP (which you have ...


5

"..." can mean different things depending on context. In the context of business email or messaging, they're typically just examples of bad style or lazy writing, an excuse to write sentence fragments and incomplete thoughts. "..." demands the reader to fill in the rest of the info as though it were too trivial to just state explicitly. "..." can have ...


0

I interpret it similarly to you. I see it as a gesture of shown silence, and a more or less subtle demand for a response. Based on context it can have negative connotations, but I can't think of a scenario where it could be interpreted in any positive way. For literature there is certainly good use of it ("To be continued..."), but not for professional ...


65

Yes, the ellipsis in this usage should not be used in professional environment. The only "good" usage of ellipsis in a sentence you're writing1 is to replace etc. Why one shouldn't use it? Written communication is subject to interpretation. In a professional environment, you always want your message to be as clear as possible so everyone will get the ...


0

"It's not me, it's you" have never been truer than in this case. We all commit all sorts of faux pas in the workplace, especially when someone comes out of the blue and confronts you as she did. It's part of being human, and until we will all get replaced by automatons, clashes like that will keep happening. And when they do happen, you have to apologize, ...


13

To answer: Is the use of ellipsis commonly considered to be unprofessional? Should I ban the three dots from my business communication? In case of any official / formal written communication, I'd strongly advise against using those. For a casual quick chat over IM, this may be acceptable, but think this way, if you are at the receiver end, you'd not ...


0

so I'm not sure how I'm supposed to avoid her or not cause her to feel uncomfortable. Just do what your boss says except "not exist" part So the solution for me now is to not interact with her, no confronting, and pretty much just.. not exist. Best I can make from this is you do not talk to her about work or just any casual talk. At least you do not ...


7

I realized I had been exceptionally ill behaved [...] she approached me out of the blue and told me that I was doing my job incorrectly. And that I had to do the polishing using the tools she does, although said she wasn't going to teach me at that point either. I got defensive and showed her the casting imperfections that I could remove from polishing and ...


5

I would like to do better the next time I am faced with this situation. How should I handle such situations, so that the other person doesn't feel embarrassed or offended, while at the same time, I can offer to help them with what I know? First off, I doubt Sam was that embarrassed. He must have told you something that led you to believe he didn't ...


1

Get over it. He has his way of solving problems, you have yours... he’s in a position to execute his solutions, you aren’t. If you feel that you can implement a better network wrapper, ask if you can have the The source code The time to work on it If you feel that you shouldn’t be using a v5/v6 wrapper, either Stick to the version you have Wrap the ...


0

You’re assuming too much. Someone could’ve pinged him while he was helping you. Got on a phone call, etc. Even if you’re correct in your assessment, you could’ve shared a folder at the 2 minute mark of your session and told him to drop the file there instead. If he’s really interested, he’s going to ask you how to do it.


1

I think it might be helpful to first explore the point of view of your coworker. The sad truth is that in many workplaces asking questions "in the wrong way" can be very harmful to asker. Your coworker is likely acutely aware of that and thus spending significant time figuring out how to do filesharing on Windows 10 is seen as "easier" and less risky than ...


3

Thanks for asking the question. While this has happened with you while working on something trivial and non-recurring scenario, many people face similar problem in their day-to-day work when they are trying to assign / delegate the work to someone else. How should I handle such situations, so that the other person doesn't feel embarrassed or offended, ...


1

You could have gone with something like: "Hi, Sam are you happy setting up a share on your computer, or would you like me to do it on mine and you can copy it over?" If he say's he'll do it then just say. "Ok, any problems just let me know." You've given him two chances to ask you for help. If time is critical and he doesn't seize this then that is really ...


4

You have in fact addressed the organizational problems correctly by raising them with your manager. Little is being done with them, but that is beyond your control. Have you considered that "pushing harder" might create a conflict that is neither necessary nor productive? As it stands, it is neither your nor your manager's job to fix these organizational ...


2

Resisting your leadership, and the company's morphosis into an enterprise? undermining your decisions by poisoning her own crew against your ideas? Thinks she is "right 99% of the time"? "Why should I change?!"? Going into childish stonewalling/silence-treatments after every talk (implying there were at least several such talks)? I'd say you have gone "...


2

No, don't do it, and yes, it's rude. It's bigger than just email, and it's bigger than a question of company policies. send an email to all the colleagues ... to raise their attention about the topics. You're talking about sending them information that they have not asked for. You have no reason to think that anyone will welcome the information. In ...


-1

You are being uncharitable and ungenerous. I'm assuming you work for a corporation. Your chief architect reports to your CTO, not your manager, and the CTO has enough direct reports and doesn't want a middle manager talking to him about a single project, hence the communication channels. The chief architect knows exactly what your project is about and ...


5

Contractors are easy to blame within a company The fact that you are a contractor changes things significantly, especially since you are also the tech lead. I don’t have an explicit answer to your question, but be careful that you aren’t being chosen to take the fall here. The CTO could just hide the cost overruns until it they hit and then blame you. The ...


11

This is office politics, stay away from it. Clearly something is going on and you don't know what it is. It doesn't sound like there is anything to get for you by escalating it - especially as a contractor. Write your concerns to the PM to cover yourself against later blaming, but leave it at that. The CTO I'm assuming that the information actually made ...


1

tl;dr - If you don't want to escalate beyond the CTO, then be proactive about doing all you can to make the right people aware of what they need to know, and document the fact you've done so. This is really all advice for your PM / ways you can work with your PM rather than something you should do directly. That being said: At one point we realize we ...


2

I think PeteCon has a good point with "The company is changing, are you coming along" - this is a growing pain that longtime employees have to go through when a company is growing up. However, I don't think that's the whole of the story. You say she's a competent employee and yet she's resisting your changes. You haven't managed to convince her of the need ...


5

If a team is regularly delivering late, there are two obvious possible causes: Either they are given more work than they can reasonably deliver. Or they are not very good at their job / not working hard enough. There is a not so obvious reason: They are not well organised, and while working hard, they are wasting time due to bad organisation. That can ...


4

It sounds like you're trying to get Linda and her team to use some kind of project tracking tools? If you're a PM, you might find this hard to believe, but many pros think PM tools are a colossal waste of time. They have a point, to be honest. This person and their team is probably working hard with limited resources. They probably need more equipment, time,...


5

I'll chime in with another way of looking at this: Hi everyone, This is Bob Bobson in Department XYZ. I just wanted to let you know that the 'Asians are Ruining This Country' rally is starting at 6 PM tonight in front of the Confucius Temple. Hope to see you all there! Cordially, Bob Bobson ... does it seem wrong for Bob to be using his ...


5

I feel before moving onto the action in PeteCon's good answer, as you have already decided to have one last talk with her, you should make that talk very direct. This is how things are now. If you do not adopt then unfortunately we have to look at replacing you. Linda has to be clear that this is not open to negotiation now and things have got serious. I ...


1

I am generally in agreement with all of those answers which say, "Don't do this." And, I am generally in agreement with many of the reasons provided by those answers, which basically amount to "this is off-topic", "this is political", etc. Although, an issue close to your heart can seem pretty non-political to you. And, you may see other people do such ...


13

I think you're starting to handle it correctly. It's not a question of 'we'd like to change', it's more; 'the company is changing. Are you coming along?'. HR need to be involved at this point, as it sounds like a PIP is in order. In the end it may be that Linda has to find a new position elsewhere. The only benefit I see here is that she has historical ...


0

"Hey there, you used the word 'usecase' but I'm not familiar with what it means, can you point me in the right direction?" You're in a new environment, so you're going to have to rely on your teammates to help you, and you can do that by clearly and politely asking specific clarifying questions, either in the moment, or later once you've written a few of ...


0

Usually companies take good care of insurance due to legal requirements. So I think you should be fine but nothing wrong in confirming. Am I being too paranoid? A bit but I can understand if someone wants to be sure. How would be the best way to get definitive proof there is adequate travel and health insurance in place for my trip? Just tell ...


2

Another reason for never sending unsolicited emails is that your email may be viewed as a security incident. At my university, a student sent a mass email to 80K people to remind everyone to vote for them in the student elections the next day. The email only took seconds to send but the investigation lasted a year.


2

Don't be afraid to ask any questions about travel. It doesn't matter if the travel is international or not, some questions about the policies and procures of your company are valid. Focusing on the international travel. How much local currency should we get for a trip of this length? If there is a corporate card can it be used internationally, or am I ...


2

How would be the best way to get definitive proof there is adequate travel and health insurance in place for my trip? Shoot an email to the travel department of your organization, with your HR and immediate superior in CC with the exact same question, and ask the details of the insurance policies. They'll be able to provide the answer (for your insurance ...


Top 50 recent answers are included