New answers tagged

1

Focus on the facts. Your review says you are making no improvement. Your job is in jeopardy. First, most people are given more than two or three months to learn a job. You need to discuss the review with your boss. This is not the time to blame your coworkers and environment. Ask what you need to do to show improvement. You can ask to schedule ...


3

Lying is rarely the best option. (Obv.) Saying nothing, or as little as possible, is easier. The problem here is that a colleague might be interested in cars, or just want to make conversation and start asking ("what was wrong? did you try this? what car do you have?"). If they ask, don't add more lies (avoid, for example, saying that you had a flat, or ...


6

I usually would recommend taking a PTO day if you're interviewing, going over a lunch break, or going during the day and letting your manager know in advance that you need to be out for X hours - If you need an excuse for why, I don't necessarily think there's much harm in saying something like a dentist appointment or needing to be there for the cable guy ...


27

Next time this happens, I would let your manager know beforehand. It's not a good idea to not show up for work and then suddenly have an excuse as you arrive for work. That will cause suspicion. If you contact your manager and explain that you're going to be late for work due to "personal obligations", that would be a good reason. Saying "personal ...


1

Perhaps your best option is to not actually answer the question if answered. Most people will jump to the conclusion that you were actually interviewing, as you were. So many may not even ask. But if they do ask, a simple "What do you think?" could be a reasonable answer. Unfortunately, the way interviews are set up, and the way it's not recommended that ...


5

If we take your situation and imagine it took place in the 'workplace' rather than in an academic setting, the solution to this problem is rather simple: The manager meets with the problematic employee, explains how he expects the members of the team to act and behave, provides the examples above where the problematic employee didn't act as he should, and ...


1

Unless they told you to use one specific method of contacting them, then either phone or email will work. Depending on the information on their card they could also ask you to contact them via social media or a contact method on their website. One advantage of email is that they don't have to be near their phone and free to talk at the moment you call. ...


3

Normally I would advise emailing them at the address on the cards. But after seeing multiple spelling and other errors in such a short question it might be best to give them a ring and see if you can arrange a meeting.


9

There is no easy fix for this situation. Here are a few things you can try Establish clear cut rules and deadlines. e.g. the deadline for bringing in new idea's is say 1 day before presenting to the client. Do no entertain any request after the deadline, even if its better than before. Have an open discussion with the trouble making team member and let him ...


9

It's certainly possible that you are reading the situation correctly, your colleague is intentionally being highly offensive to you, and you need to stand up for yourself. Based on your question history, though, I would tend to suspect that it's a cultural miscommunication or the result of some other source of stress. Yesterday, you thought you were being ...


3

The problem with someone else's face and expressions is that it is their face and expressions, and there is nothing you can or should do to change that. Some people have what is called "resting bitch face" but that doesn't mean that they are always angry, it just means their face is their face. Your co-worker appears to have what you interpret as as a ...


2

I've worked in IT for over twenty years so I know it can be stressful. I also know that there can be some big egos involved from time to time. I would recommend taking him aside quietly to try to clear the air. More face to face communication rather than email. Emails can be so easily taken out of context. Praise in public, scold in private. If this ...


9

Sometimes doing something will make the situation worse. If your TL has indicated that he has dealt with it, you should trust him, as you appear to do so. You don't know what's going on in the guys head. There could be work pressures, personal life pressures etc. In addition, nobody likes their team being "told off" despite how delicately you may have ...


3

Developer here. Since I've actually talked to executives a fair amount of times, and my step-mom worked for CEOs of an F500 corporation, and I've visited their offices, I think I can help. I would love recommendations (literature welcome!) on business etiquette, attire, small talk, how to handle a potential conversation about a promotion, how to present ...


0

As with many questions on Workplace, good communication is at the heart of the answer. My suggestion: Convene a weekly (or daily) conference telephone call with all your participants. If you can, use a conference service with video capability. There are plenty of those. The point of a call rather than an email thread is to expose all participants to their ...


-1

Show them this, with special attention to "good":


0

If you are the leader, you set deadlines and you enforce them. If you don't enforce deadlines, people will just walk all over you, and you're not really the leader. In your specific instance you have a single member of a team who is trying to control your project. You can either take the heavy-handed approach -- "I'm sorry, but we're out of time and I'll be ...


2

The more you learn about how senior leaders think, the more you learn the concepts and language that connect most effectively with them. This will need to be a bit of a crash course, since you only have a week, but you can learn a bit. Find some of the stuff out there on the 'Net on management (Manager Tools is my favorite; you could also read some articles ...


3

The other answer is great, but my comments were too long for a comment. The first thing to understand is that an EVP / SVP has the same goals any 2nd or 3rd line and above manager has -- the effective and profitable operation of the business. The higher up the ladder the more abstract the objectives become, but the goal is generally the same -- the ...


12

How does one prepare for this? Perhaps the most important thing is to keep calm and be yourself and don't pretend/boast. I also suggest you ask your boss if there is anything you should prepare or do before the trip and meeting. Regarding attire, you should most definitely suit up, specially when going to important meetings like this. Now, I must say a ...


9

my work in flexible I.e. if I start at 7, can finish at 4. Given that your work is flexible (and thus your manager is ok with that) some options you can propose I can think of are: Ask to go pick your child and then come back to work, leaving some time later so you can do your daily hours. See if you can work remotely after you pick up your son. You can ...


4

You do not seem to understand the difference between declining a shift when the manager is doing the scheduling, and dropping an accepted shift with two hours notice on a Sunday. Think of it from her point of view. On Friday, if you had declined the shift, the manager could have easily scheduled someone else. On Sunday, with two hours notice, it would be ...


3

Unless the offices next to your office are "hot-boxing" their offices, I can nearly guarantee that you are not getting any contact with THC or CBD. These chemicals are only present in the air when the plant material is heated to the point of where THC becomes THC-A (activated THC that gives the effects) or if concentrations are heated to the point of ...


0

I advise you to seek a lawyer on this subject. Yes, it's ethical to report this, but you may get yourself into legal trouble that you cannot get out of as easily. After all you admitted receiving money you did not earn. Nobody wants to seem "incompetent" especially if their job is on the line. So by bringing this up to payroll, the person may cover their ...


2

This happened to me at a facility I worked for concerning Vaping of staff and visitors who came in the building. The problem was that the management smoked them too. I went to HR stating that vaping, just like smoking indoors should be considered the same type of violation. I also stated that I personally should not be subject with these chemicals swarming ...


14

It really reeks of marijuana every day at work and I'm concerned about the health consequences it might have It's important to differentiate between the smoke and the natural smell of the plant. The smoke is the one that has the "high" effect, and also the one that contains the chemicals known to produce such high (CBD, THC, whatever else it has). Now, ...


-2

It helps me to concentrate on what I'm doing and retain specific elements of the idea into my memory bank when I think out loud. It helps me to stay focused when so many other "noises" are vying for my attention, such as the conversation happening down the hall, or a co-workers phone ringing. It seems to me that you should find a way to cope with the ...


4

Even if they have strep, it is quite plausible they caught it from someone else: if you have an infectious disease, that means it is spreading in your community. Everyone in your community is likely to get exposed to someone with it in a window of time surrounding when you get sick. So rather than apologize, I'd focus on the warning. If your workspace is ...


4

The recruiter will act in their best interest. And it’s absolutely not in their best interest to tell your boss. I can go to a recruiter and say “I don’t want to stay in my job forever. I’m not in a rush, but give me a call if anything turns up.” Good news for the recruiter: He will eventually find a new job for me and cash in. Telling my manager isn’t ...


2

He demonstrated professionalism and "care" by actually following up, and every now and then, "investigating" if I am happy or would like to move on to something else. It is been a while I did not hear from him though while still employed. His sole motivation is to place candidates in positions so that he can get paid. That means that a recruiter will "...


18

I would want to use him in my new search, but this will guarantee that my current manager know about my plan This is not going to happen, because: Before the switch: It is not in the recruiter's interest to inform your manager, as a recruiter earns commission when you get the job via them. But them telling your manager is a relationship spoiler for the ...


4

Your wanting a new job is indisputably a good thing from the recruiters standpoint, It means he or she will get paid again. Unless you're dealing with an in house recruiter or a real sleazeball, there's zero reason for one to burn bridges by tipping off your current employer.


2

Whenever you talk to the CEO, or anyone else, bring a paper and pen and take notes. If you need to catch up with writing notes ask the CEO to pause for a few seconds. I then transfer all my notes to a tree-type information manager called Keynote. There are several other tree-type information managers out there that are free.


5

Meeting minutes, action items, and a follow-up email. I didn't really understand the power of these until I saw them in action at a Fortune 500 company and saw a manager who had 100% buy-in when using them. Yes, it sounds cumbersome, and it does take a little time, but they are a life-saver. In nearly any meeting, a meeting-minutes person was chosen (...


59

I decided to go ahead and email him to express that I hope he gets well soon and that I was diagnosed with strep. I did not apologize in the email. My reasons for doing so is as follows: We work together frequently enough that an email with some personal information isn't too unusual Since it's flu season (which strep can be confused for) and we work in ...


13

I worked in a factory where we were almost on top of each other. They say that people get can get sick from the same person at different times. E.g. Amy could come in with it on Monday, give it to you and Joe and Joe could actually get sick before Amy, and then you after Joe so Joe might think he gave it to you when he actually caught it from the person who ...


0

It wouldn't give a bad impression at all. It probably wont leave any impression. They probably have plenty of people already kissing up over it. Unless you two have spoken and recognize one another, you'll get a generic thank you reply at best and nothing at worst. You have nothing to lose doing this, but you also have nothing to gain. I think the rest of ...


2

This depends a lot on what is customary in your locale. With the caveat that I am Canadian and this is what is customary in my locale, here is my response: I think you're overthinking this. People give diseases to others at work all the time. It happens. You did your best to let everyone know not to come close to you and so on. The rest is not your ...


23

Yes, your response is appropriate. Most of the time, were this a common cold or the flu, I would say a message like this is not necessary and not to worry about it. However, since this is specifically strep throat, which may not go away without the correct treatment, I think it's worth mentioning. The main point of the message is that you have information ...


192

My question is, is this an appropriate way to express my concern and apologize if I accidentally spread my illness to him? I think you may be worrying about this a bit too much, and if you provide inaccurate information you could cause more harm than good. Unless you are 100% certain you caused this persons illness, there really isn't much to say and an ...


4

Communication around situations like this should typically be lead by the culture in your company. Of course, none of us know the culture in your company, so you will have to look for some clues. In general, is the CEO easy for employees to reach? Are they on chat, or do they have a feedback function for the CEO on the company's intranet? Do they sit out in ...


12

I think in this case it all depends on how well you actually know this person. If they would not recognize you if you bumped into them in the hallway, then I would not worry about this. However, if you know the CEO, meaning you have had a conversation with this person and would be comfortable striking up a conversation with this person in the elevator, ...


1

Hey Mr. X, I have some questions around problem Y and I need your assistance. Are we able to discuss this at some stage, or alternatively, are you able to indicate who I should be speaking to regarding this? Thank you, Serene


1

Do they need a reference from a current colleague, or do they need a reference from your employer? If from the employer, what kind of reference? You don’t indicate a region, in the US the majority of companies give little if anything beyond employment history (start and stop dates). You need to clarify this with your prospective employeer and see what ...


-2

You throw them under the bus. And by "them" I mean the prospective employer. The only "reference" a new employer should ever require of the existing employer is status as a current employee which is completely independent of calling the current employer. It is beyond bad form to request a current reference which is more than just proof of employment. For ...


7

Check your current employer's policies on references. Many companies have a pretty strict policy that restricts references to job title(s) and employment dates. Mostly that's for legal protection: this is all objective data and you can't get sued over it. If that's the case, simply state to your prospective employer that they can't get a meaningful ...


5

It's unlikely to help. Chances are they noticed this themselves: Interviewing costs time and money and if the lacking requirement eliminated the candidate through oversight, they are likely to update the JD and more importantly the pre-interview screening process. If they are not smart or organized enough to take action on this, your notification is ...


2

I'm often feeling a need to do that. "No experience required - at least 5 years experience" "babysitter wanted - need to be able to wield" "high expertise level wanted - for a junior position". The thing is - I would be wasting my time to let them know I THINK there is something wrong with their ad. But was it? Maybe they know exactly what they're doing? ...


4

What would you gain by telling them? You won't get the role, but I guess it might keep your name in a slightly positive light should you apply for a different role. If they haven't put in a key skill to their job description then they will no doubt not get the candidates they actually want, to me it would seem if they miss something basic like that then ...


1

That company could be interviewing a number of people, they haven't decided yet, and they want to keep you available in case they decide that you're it. From your side, never assume that the decision has been made until after you have a written offer in your hands (email is acceptable). Until then, keep looking for other jobs, keep interviewing, behave as ...


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