New answers tagged

1

I don't think you should move to the new company Changing from being contracted by a company to another should require an agreement from both sides. Certainly so given the salary change, as you state you would earn less in Company B. So, from the outside, and not knowing the specifics of your country, based on the provided information, I think you should ...


3

There is nothing ethically wrong with anything you are planning on doing. It is never unethical to leave a job you dislike, for any reason, at any time. Your employer would have no question or issue about firing you at any time for any reason they like (this is true of all companies, at all times, always) and so you should have exactly the same ...


16

You should consult a lawyer over this. A company cannot force you to transfer to a new company. They can ask you to voluntarily transfer, or they can fire you from the bank and offer you a new job at the new company. You are free to take the new job or not. Alternatively the bank can sell your contract to the new company, but if they do that then the new ...


34

Is it ethical that I resign immediately after the contract... Yes. Any duty to remain at a company ends when the contract does; that's by design. You don't owe it to the company to keep working for them after that. ...how should I explain to the HRD and Manager that I want to resign and do not want to move to company B ? These reasons you've already given ...


13

I am also from Indonesia. And I think If I were you, I'll gonna find more worker who like me to try discuss with the superior to see if we have other solution. We know due to the Goverment Regulation Banking companies are prohibited from developing internal applications (because security data) and must using services from vendors. But it doesn't mean you can ...


0

I prefer: "Sorry, maybe something got lost here" or "I would like to put focus on ....", depending on you position.


1

"Their efforts to assist in the development of this project were second to none."


1

If your project was stalled by another team claiming to be doing the same thing, you must have done something else instead, right? They stalled our project for six months saying they were working on something identical and confidential, but nothing was being done, they just wanted to stop us. "We were relieved that our colleagues were already working ...


0

If you are at a point where people are commenting that you come off as condescending, it is probably because you are repeating things that don't need repeating. These situations normally looks something like this: Bill is Peter's manager. Yesterday Peter did not put a cover page on his TPS report, so Bill thinks that he needs to repeat himself to make sure ...


0

The management of my company wants people to be positive all the time. Don't complain, don't call out mistakes, don't criticise, be constructive It's a huge red flag. They are not interesting in solving problems that normally the management solves. They don't care about the problem you have. They want you to pretend everything is great and solve the problem ...


0

Others have answered for a situation where an explanation is asked that was given earlier. I often give more or less repeated explanations without being asked. I often have situations where I explain some effect and want to explicitly express different views on that point. Some people may think the explanations pretty redundant, others may think that ...


0

I find it often helpful to repeat the other person's words or questions: "If I hear you correctly, you're concerned about problem A? Is that right?" That gives the other person the chance to either correct your understanding of problem A, or reflect on his or her own anxiety. Once you are all in agreement on what exactly constitutes problem A, you ...


0

First off, I don't know what kind of communication you do, which may be relevant. I'm making some sweeping assumptions and generalizations here. You should first ask yourself if you actually NEED to repeat yourself. If you don't want to come across as condescending, you have to shift your own mindset; assume the reader understood what you said or wrote the ...


1

First answer the question: is it necessary to demonstrate my skill in X? Generally speaking, unless someone is asking about or requesting some expertise, it gains you nothing to bring it up and can make some people lose respect for you. If you do decide it's necessary to indicate your level of skill, it is enough to say 'I am familiar with X, here's what I ...


2

The best way in my opinion is to reword your sentence. So for example if you said 'we're going to the supermarket' you could say 'we're gonna pick up some stuff from the shop'. It makes the other party feel less guilty about having missed your message and doesn't irritate third parties as much because even though you're saying the same thing, it sounds new.


3

Short answer: you don't turn down these meetings, because you don't (and cannot) know if they are actually useless. You have just a role in your company and you don't have a full picture of what is going on. Nonetheless, you should trust what the management is doing. They hired (and payed) someone to improve the situation and you should, at least in this ...


4

First, sit down with the other team lead to hear their side of the story. Find out what they think happened. This meeting should be one-on-one and informal. Do not approach this meeting with preconceived notions like "They tried to block us". There is a good chance you will find that they had reasons for what they did. Don't interrupt, don't ...


6

Are these really useless meetings? From what I could read from your message about Mike - it is to have a recurring meeting, where you reevaluate the status, find are there any blockers, if any new issues arise or the old one is resolved. This essentially becomes like regular status meetings, and the purpose is mostly communication and updates. Basically, ...


19

Document the meetings. Basically take minutes of what was discussed, what was suggested and why it will/won't work. If it won't work, document why. For the "workarounds", pick one or two that can be easily shown whether it's an improvement or not and implement it. Document how much time that took, what was affected in your daily work and whether ...


-4

Just be constructive. Don't blame the other team to block you or not being cooperative. You have to phrase it in a positive way instead: Please help us! Please work with us! We could profit from a more cooperative relationship. We could be far less delayed, if we would be able to work together with the other team. We should learn from this and improve this ...


114

the most important case is being asked in a public forum/team discussion: "why didn't you collaborate with Team X on this?". If the situation is the way you have presented it here then the answer is easy: you did collaborate with them. "We discussed the project with Team X, and as per this [email / ticket reference / instant message / ...


-1

The fact is: In English there is no way to "absolutely politely" achieve this. Anything you say, it is unfortunately absolutely obvious that you are "just being polite". -- One formulation I use is to "make it my fault", So: "Ahh, damn, sorry I was not clear enough, the server can't be NT..." However this is NOT a ...


6

That's a very good question and whereas I haven't found the ultimate solution yet, I think sticking to facts helps. Don't make assumptions. Don't hypothesize about what happened. Instead, say, when it is happening: "Person A isn't able to deliver according to our schedule. Whatever the reason is, if we wait any longer, the risk is the project will fail. ...


3

"Working with team B is always a pleasure and fun. I fondly remember the time when they played a practical joke on us: For example, they claimed to be working on something identical to project C. We had such a good laugh when we found out about it six months later. It is always nice to face new challenges at work, and building project C from the ground ...


21

The simplest way to is to refrain from making assumptions, as your negative assumptions are going to flavour whatever reality exists. For example, if you are asked: "Why didn't you collaborate with Team X on this?" Instead of "because they lied to us about doing the same just to stall us" consider saying "I mentioned project X to ...


11

how to communicate positively and constructively an event which was negative and destructive? When asked to present on or discuss a project, you discuss the project, not the other team or other issues. If you're tasked to discuss any issues or needed procedure changes that were discovered during the process then that is a different matter.


2

In formal meetings you simply don't interrupt who's speaking, no matter their position. If you really have to, it's because you have something very important to say and, in my opinion, sharing an experience does not qualify. In meetings you don't try to show competencies, you propose solutions. Competencies are the tools that allow you to find solutions. For ...


2

I would let him speak. Occasionally, I would him questions about his experience, but very to-the-point / technical. Eventually making subtle hints about my experience. So you encountered situation Y? Which solution do you prefer, C or T? I usually chose T because.... I would choose C only if... Possible continuation: Wow! It never occurred to me to try ...


2

These situations are usually lose-lose. Whatever you do, they have a reason to hurt you. Additionally (unfortunately) there is no easy way out of this, without leaving the company. The bright side If the company is not rotten "by definition", then it might help you to report project problems (and there solutions as you see them) to higher ...


9

As a developer, I just turn a gray stone face and say it again, and sometimes they figure out that I've told them before and sometimes they don't. I might say, "We need to create a new layer for the Accessdata," and then they might say, "Oh, you said that earlier, oops. Sorry but I don't know the technical part that well." It is natural ...


71

Is there a way to repeat oneself so that it’s clear the intent is earnest, rather than condescending? Of course there is. First, drop all the preludes - they come across as snarky. Second, assume your first statement was confusing. Find a new way to better convey your meaning, rather than just using the same words a second time. Third, watch and listen for ...


178

By saying things like "Again" or "As we discussed" you are putting the onus of the misunderstanding on the listener. You are simply repeating the explanation that presumably the listener didn't understand the first time. Instead, put the misunderstanding onto yourself, by saying something like "I didn't explain that very well" ...


4

There isn't a whole lot you can do. In all US companies that I worked, that's standard practice: when you max out your leave you stop accruing and anything else is forfeit. Your company is actually being generous by allowing a conversion into Medical Leave time (at least in the US that would be better than normal). Your best approach is to ask nicely and ...


2

Neither boss said anything to you, because they are dead wrong and they both know it, and they don't want to confront how wrong they are. The whole point of taking a break is to get away from the stresses of work. Asking your staff to include a particular lady in their private social coffee breaks, when they obviously don't want to, is asking them to remain ...


12

Is it wise to let the PO know that I do not know much of the product API's because of many factors and I am in the 8th month of my employment? Hell. No. You've already established something of a reputation as being a bit below the company's (not unreasonable) expectations for someone hired as a senior developer. All this would do is cement that reputation ...


6

Instead of attributing a reason, ask the person/people most likely to have an answer. "Where can I learn more about the Product APIs?" is a perfectly valid question. Certainly they would have documentation, examples of client usage, and of course the code that implements them. Standard expectation in a company is that you could read up on those ...


15

Just saying "I don't know the product APIs" is honestly pretty bad. You've been there 8 months, you should have taken some responsibility for your own learning by now. More generally, and looking at your other posts, this seems to be a continuation of a theme where you are looking to blame everybody else for the problems with your employment - you ...


0

If these settings are exactly as you stated, you should decide what you want to do There are two ways: start looking for another job and keep quite, documenting every command of your current manager in order to cover your behind, an leave as soon as suitable position found. Go over his head to the bosses bosses boss with original plan, changes of your ...


-1

First, I think this is unprofessional for the exact same reasons why the behavior in the other question is unprofessional, although perhaps it will be seen as a little bit less prima-donna-ish, since you are not insisting that the right not to work with the technology is an absolute condition for you to work for this employer. So it’s still unprofessional, ...


5

All that you mention seems to be more constructive approaches, stances, and polite communication in general than saying "I won't work with X technology, period.", or asking for a contract that states that you won't ever work with X technology. The phrasings you use are more of the form "I would work with X technology if needed or required, but ...


1

A manager can operate a meeting any way they like within reason. Is everything getting said that needs saying? If it is its just the rudeness you are dealing with, rudeness will have a way of getting him back if he does it everywhere and all the time, so you can let him hang with his own rope. But if not everything is getting said that needs saying, you ...


1

Next time there is a review of your work, you tell them that you deserve a good raise for all the work you did, specifying exactly those areas. Your boss will be surprised because that colleague claimed it was his work. Now you act all surprised, because that is total news to you, and you tell your boss that your colleague would have had no idea how to do ...


1

Go directly at the source and clear things up. Assuming the meeting are improptu you can go see 'The lady' and indicate that the impromptu coffee meetings do not require invitation and are not exclusive. You can state that they are not coordinatedand and whoever can come chat. Once this is cleared up if the complains arise again you can restate this via ...


6

One lady in particular is late most every day, comes and goes as she pleases and doesn’t offer to help when needed so she has lost some respect of ppl in our department. This is the real problem - people don't like her for a work-related reason. Her boss then went to mine to tell him the same. My boss then went to one of my staff, went in her office with ...


-3

This line stands out to me: I was really excited initially when I started here because there were so many things to improve. This wouldn't have been the case if the Lead Dev you mention was a better developer. In fact, you've been given a great opportunity to tackle these problems with apparently a more or less free hand to do as you pleased. A lot of devs ...


3

Problem 1: Behavior At this point I don't understand why he does that. It's a behavior of a child who wants to have it his own way although his own way is wrong. One might say it is...Narcissistic behavior. If he gave me any arguments, even arguments such as "I subjectively don't like working with [technology A]" or "My boss asked me to do ...


0

Your manager's job is to deliver "value" through the team. That implies that the team needs to be in a good state - people are happy, they're motivated, they have the proper technical skills to attack the problems of the team, etc. Having periodic 1:1s is one of the main ways managers achieve the above. Therefore asking to ditch this is asking your ...


8

Manage upward Some people who end up in management positions without much management ability believe that being the boss means they need to make the decisions. It may be that your boss is pushing you to make changes because he feels obligated to assert his authority. Even though he doesn't understand the consequences of the decisions, his priority is to have ...


1

I'm starting to think he simply does that in order not to agree with me and massively distrusts my judgement. This might be the case but it probably isn't as simple as that. Are there any reasons why your boss might not trust you? Poor performance or previous bad judgements could be the reason, but more often this kind of mistrust is based on some kind of ...


0

Somehow, you seem to "conveniently provide" all sorts of justifications for your bosses' behavior – other than the possibility that his point-of-view just might be a bit more experienced than yours. Why don't you start by ... asking him? Because, by definition of the command-structure, it will be his "ass that's in a sling," not yours, if ...


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