New answers tagged

0

I think the issue with being "factual" in this case is that your boss will likely call a meeting to gather everyone to figure it out. Imagine presenting these findings right in front of the person you know who did it? Since your objective is to be discrete, I think this method will backfire. With that said, I would call your boss over for a private meeting ...


0

Unlike what others have said I think in this case you have to report what you have heard because there are one of two things likely going on and neither of them are good. Either you are being targeted specifically or the IT team is not able to track down the issue and most of not all of your co-workers are being impacted and not able to work at full ...


20

I think this a bit more serious than you understand. Let me try to give you an analogy. You're a cook in a large kitchen. Every once in awhile, you can't cook potatoes because the oven doesn't work - and you just found out that the reason is because another chef is tinkering around the electric transformer for the city block during their breaks. ...


6

Whenever someone says a rule, it's generally important to follow it if you can... but it's even more important to figure out why the rule is in place. In this case, the manager doesn't want you to say, "Geez, that new Flooby movie absolutely sucks" - and a potential movie-goer overhears it and decides that maybe they shouldn't come and watch Flooby next ...


-1

Now might be a good time (a few days after the initial email). The question your colleague in HR is trying to figure out might take some research, so they might not have an answer for you, but could at least give you an idea of when you should expect an answer. Alternatively, you should consider talking to the member of HR in person or over the phone if you ...


-1

At many companies, the practise is to revert to the candidate within 2 business days with results once an interview is concluded. In your case, the interview never completely happened due to the concerns of the interviewer around the hoops to be jumped. Since all three of you (HR, Interviewer, and you) are working at the same company, and already almost 3 ...


-1

Typically a full business day. That means I'd likely just shoot over a polite email on Tuesday or Wednesday asking if they'd had a chance to think about it. It being Wednesday, they've had a chance to address it if they took a day off on Monday, or just had a million fires to put out when they got into the office.


16

There will be many more instances in your work life where peers or people you have no authority over are doing something that goes against company policy or your own ethics. Here is some general advice: If what they are doing does not affect your job and is not causing imminent and serious danger, then let it go. They have managers, and that is the ...


3

I'd do absolutely nothing. Don't be THAT guy to try to tell them to stop it, or to tattle to the boss. And don't join in, either. This is not the same as if you'd specifically hear them badmouthing a particular film that was showing, or serving alcohol to anyone under age. I'd let it slide.


12

Just stay factual, do not put blame on anyone. Report what happend: you cannot make your deadlines, because the WLAN breaks down too often. Make sure you have recorded when this happens and why that's a problem for you. Then let whoever's job it is take the problem from there. Maybe your coworker will be found out. Maybe they'll stop if they know somebody ...


2

Maybe don't broadly expose what you've found, but you should consider raising a concern to your manager and confronting your colleague. Security is a serious issue regardless of domain. If you would report someone compromising the physical security of your firm (maybe damaging locks or copying keys) then you should feel similarly about cyber security. A ...


2

If you don't feel comfortable exposing him directly, at a minimum I'd bring to the boss's attention the method that's being used. If you can point it out without implementing him directly, do it. At that point, it's certainly possible an investigation would be done that would then lead to him.


-1

I think, like has been mentioned, going back with a solution is always better than pointing out problems. In this case Git is great for source code management, however you may want to use it for something which it was not really designed for. Maybe you can use something like Artifactory (or something similar) as this is for the result of your build process,...


2

Right now, you are arguing with your boss about abstracts. About the future, which is hard to predict. Convincing someone your prediction of the future is going to come true has been a challenge for millennia :) It's easier to argue based on facts. So if you think there is something in the future that will go wrong, simulate it. I assume you are a ...


-2

I don't think it's particularly wrong in this case to check in some dlls, specifically the ones generated from licensed compilers. And I don't see where is the big mistake that the company will be paying for. Having said that you should propose to follow best practices, instead of pointing fingers at them being "wrong", because they are not. For example, ...


-4

Nothing wrong with committing binary files. The versioning system is there for you to commit anything reasonable for the project. Compiled binary files on versioning for a private team is more than reasonable. There's no need to convince your boss for something that's working. Your boss made the right decision.


13

A general rule is: Don't go to your boss with problems, go to him or her with solutions. [1] Saying "this is a bad idea, if we do it we'll be sorry in a year" isn't helpful. What you need to do is to come up with an alternative plan that avoids the problem while also accomplishing the goals of the problematic one. In your case I assume it would be some ...


0

How to convince my boss not to commit binary files and assets to git? I feel you have already done your part. Further convincing or pushing him with more arguments isn't going to automatically change the situation. I wonder if I should insist. If I should, what would be good technical arguments? Refrain from insisting anymore at this point. Maybe there ...


2

Do I need to be concerned that my manager somehow knew I was looking to leave? The timing is way too on-the-mark with my job search, as I only seriously started looking a couple of weeks ago. Why would you be concerned about whether or not they know you've been looking around? If you feel that their knowing puts you in a position of power then let them ...


12

Do I need to be concerned that my manager somehow knew I was looking to leave? No you need not. At this point it's not relevant if they somehow found out about that, as you already got the raise. It could have been, perhaps, that they felt you a bit demotivated and that inspired them to give you a raise. If they really value me so much, WHY would a ...


4

It sounds to me like your manager values your work, recognises you were underpaid (as he's already spoken to you about an upcoming pay rise), and realised that you are not happy with it (otherwise he wouldn't have spoken to you about a planned pay rise that's months away, and he'll certainly recognise the effect on your morale of the bonus being turned down)....


0

Unless you're being directly blamed or have the direct responsibility for the failure, it doesn't make sense to draw a target on your back making upper management aware of your boss' ignorance. This can easily be misconstrued in a variety of ways that would make you a malcontent even if you were 100% correct. In my experience, it's always been a good thing ...


0

Do you have a copy of that email? Be ready to produce it. I wouldn't go running to upper management with it, but if asked, you need to be able to show that you warned your manager about it. If asked, admit openly that you knew hardware was a possible issue, and you warned management of it some time ago.


17

Whenever you are in a situation where sh*t has hit the fan and people are asking questions, just be factual. When they ask what happened, say that the server failed. When they ask if you knew it was going to fail, say yes. When they ask if you did anything to prevent it, say yes. When they ask what you did to prevent it, show your papertrail/suggestions, ...


2

It would be best if you could wait for your supervisor to come back from leave before starting any transfer process. If the other supervisor is keen on you, they should be prepared to wait. When your supervisor gets back, you should ask their permission as a sign of respect before engaging with the other supervisor with regards to a job switch. In a perfect ...


0

How do I tell my boss that I may consider this job that will be open soon? This is a two step process: Talk to the supervisor who informed / offered you about the role, and gather the requirements and / or prerequisites for the new role. Analyze the requirements and if you see yourself as a good fit, once your manager is back, invite them to a meeting and ...


1

I know this question is old and a lot of great answers have been posted. However, as the OP, I want to post my experience with this since I do have the experience to back it and I thought it would be relevant and might surprise some people. Just an FYI update, I have changed jobs since then. I took the advice and didn't tell my manager. Things went up and ...


3

However all staff were told to continue as normal. I would suggest that, when in doubt, consult with your manager what to do. If you are not clear how to handle this information with clients, approach your manager and ask. However, seems clear to me that they asked all of you to "continue as normal". That implies that you should make as if the closing will ...


2

From my own experience, this is your employer doing something unethical and dishonest. There are laws in the USA that protect "whistle blowers" from backlash, but you'll have to research that in your own location. Also, this only protects a person if they go to the authorities, rather than the public. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/...


6

This isn't something we can answer for you, since it's really just about two competing concepts: The logistical, bottom-line financial perspective. This would tell you to tell the customers nothing. Because doing so would cause the company problems, and likely cause employees problems as well. Your guilt/responsibility about possibly costing the customers ...


3

Don't inform the clients, you gain nothing by doing so. Your company has asked you not to say anything so by saying something to the clients you risk your own job ( while you still have one ) at this company. This means you may lose out on salary, benefits, and possibly a severance ( if you stay until the end ) when the company closes down. This is not ...


7

Your first responsibility is to your company not the customers. Imagine if you told all the customers now, they would obviously start jumping ship. This would as you would expect drain money from the company. This could cause the company to close up shop faster thus putting you all out on the street before you had a chance to secure new jobs. My advice ...


0

According to OSHA, you have a right to refuse unsafe work. However, as @MisterPositive suggested, you can (and should according to the regulation) absolutely ask your employer for the right tools. This is part of your duty to: Ask your employer to correct the hazard, or to assign other work.


0

You are not given the right tools (gloves, dust mask, etc). You probably need to look at OSHA Regulations. The issue isn't that it's unrelated to your job description, it's that it's a safety hazard. There's contact information on their site you can use to ask questions and find out what your rights are. You are asked to remove floor tile from an office. ...


3

Can you refuse this task? Yes you can. You can also most likely be terminated too. Take a look at your employment contract, employee handbook, etc. Most companies have this little clause "and other duties as necessary" that is designed to be a catch all for other miscellaneous crap the company may need you to do. You might want to check with your ...


2

Interviews are meant to be two-way: The employer is evaluating your fitness for the position. But, employers generally also want to make sure you know enough about them that you can decide if you'll be happy working there or not. As such, interviewers generally expect questions from candidates. Often, candidates are explicitly allowed time to ask questions, ...


4

Apart from the answers above, there are a few points that I see. They sent you an email to your company email address but they don't know which company it is. Usually in events like this(conferences, hackathons, meetups, ...) the interactions are done through the company("We're inviting you in collaboration with CompanyX(your company) to attend Event Y"). ...


1

This is probably a fairly common invitation to "networking events". Look for a document called "Code of Business Conduct" or similar (it may be "Ethical Business Practices"). It is a great opportunity to learn what you can do and what you cannot. If your company has such a thing you will learn there what the rules for invited events are. If you feel that ...


10

I think your company is testing your resistance to social engineering attacks. Forward the letter to your IT security department, and think about how this set of answers would let an outsider start to play a game that would compromise your security further. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Social_engineering_(security)


-2

If they are interested in you, you will eventually have to fill out an application. Just make sure to separate it out on that document. In some places (my area of the US being one of them) lying on a resume isn't a big deal(1) because you didn't sign it. A job application is a signed document that if you falsify you can be fired "with cause" (which ...


3

I have hired people in the private sector. This is not an issue. In the interview you can mention you worked in two separate labs doing similar things. Call it whatever you want, but don't call it a mistake. In the interview you want to highlight you successes and why you are a good fit for this position. Going into minutia about why you listed this ...


13

Sounds very fishy. In our company, if we'd get something like that, we'd treat it as a security incident unless it were from a known source and sent to people known to be outside contacts with that source (e.g. sales for customer or sales events, senior developers for things like OracleOne, etc. etc.), and report it to our security manager as such, who'd ...


7

What's a nice, diplomatic way to end this without burning bridges or making myself look bad? A simple statement, something like the one below, should do the trick: Thank you Mr. XYZ for the job opportunity you presented to me. However, because of some changes in my life, I am temporarily not looking for a new job any more. Maybe we shall have the ...


2

Shoot him an email outlining that it has been brought to your attention that he does not feel you ask him enough questions which result is slowdowns. Ask him to clarify his concerns, and inform you of the best way to communicate your questions to him. If he contradicts what you have been told send his response to your supervisor and ask they help you how ...


11

How should I proceed in this situation? Start asking the boss questions again. It is better to have a problem of asking too many questions instead of having the problem of not asking any questions. If you feel that the boss could help by answering a question then you should at least ask the question. Remember that asking questions is never pointless ...


32

You asked a few related questions: I would like to attend the event (is it real?) Of course, none of us can literally tell you if it's real or not, but the scheme is somewhat common. Typically, these sort of "networking" sessions are set up with a hook (free food!) and are a thin veil for a marketing firm or vendor to try to get a captive audience so ...


143

These types of events are usually nothing more than a sales pitch by a vendor to get your company to buy its products or use its services. Before you unilaterally decide to register and attend you need to find out your company policy on gifts. Depending where you work, a free dinner can be considered a gift and you need to understand your company's policy ...


146

Sounds like a networking event - and given you were "invited" through the company e-mail it sounds as if you'd be attending as a representative of the company. Especially given the questions asked. Best course of action in that case is to discuss it with your manager to see if this is something the company sees as being potentially beneficial. If so the ...


91

This isn't a problem. I cannot imagine anyone caring. You had the same employer, same job title. Just worked in a different "office" and under a different supervisor. Unless you wanted to highlight having more jobs or the difference between the jobs, merging them makes perfect sense and declutters your resume. It doesn't matter if it is a new contract ...


8

I resolved this problem in two ways: I got a dual sim phone (but a second phone would work) with the cheapest plan I could find (approx £6/month for 200 minutes of calls which is more than enough). I use this number exclusively for recruitment. I set my voicemail message to explain my situation. In my case, I am a contractor, so when I am in a contract, my ...


Top 50 recent answers are included