New answers tagged

1

All of the above suggestions for shutting down the conversation with your longtime boss and coworker are poor suggestions, imo. Having worked with this person for years, leaving a clear and happy atmosphere behind you is important. Be unfailingly bright and personable in your responses. With goodwill, answer: The decision to leave was difficult, and not ...


-1

Just say its you personal choice and you have no hard feelings. Say ,I am sorry. You have to learn to say "No" eventually. Just behave in good manners with fellows who insists you. Even though you are leaving , you may have feelings for the company you work with. So do not hide your feelings with the manager . Make up your mind and say him that its your ...


9

In short, because you're using a company asset to promote the workplace of a different company. Like you said in your post, you were aware of where your coworkers were going through personal conversations. Which is generally just fine (though you don't want to stray into "Dude, you should check out how great it is over there - they still have openings, you ...


-1

Summary of the answers Stephan Branczyk suggests to go for the route of asking if he needs any help, and that offering to pay him will insult him because the money wouldn't be enough. bethlakshmi suggests to have a video call with the volunteer, so that both sides' expectations and limitations are clear to the other. Myles suggests that volunteer prefers ...


0

First things, first. Change your user name and if possible, photo as well. Secondly, be practical. You were duped by your manager. He successfully misled you in many ways and you are bearing the brunt of it. Possible solution is to talk to him in a super nice tone, ask him to release you asap as nothing is pending from your end. And also mention about ...


1

I was in a very similar situation to yours almost a decade ago. Working on a software solution I didn't like ("The Bad Place"), with managament making vague promises that I would be moved to the other solution I liked ("The Good Place") but no specific commitment in terms of a timeline. You're doing the right thing, leaving a job that doesn't make you happy,...


6

I think the best thing you can do is to change your feelings regarding this. Instead of being annoyed by everything try to be amused instead. Amused that they think you will reconsider. Amused that they want you to stay but offer nothing. Amused they use your time for meetings instead of handover. Amused that they think you are ok with using old technology. ...


0

In your situation I would be honest with them and explain what you wrote in your question. I don't think it'd be pushy to ask why Slack didn't work for them; maybe they wanted to do something niche that Slack couldn't support. That doesn't necessarily mean they should rule it out altogether. In my experience people generally tend to be reluctant to start ...


2

I've been on both sides of this - I've been both the skilled but unpaid volunteer, and the leader who is trying to get the volunteer effort to move in the direction he needs. Coming from the volunteer perspective - there certainly are some tasks that "pay" more than others when the pay is in valuable experience and the joy of accomplishing something vs. ...


82

If the facts are with you, argue the facts. If the law is with you, argue the law. If nothing is with you, just argue. ————— old lawyer's proverb This is the sound of them having nothing to offer you. They can't offer a serious money raise, or they would have offered it already. They can't place you in a job role you find fulfilling, or they would have ...


17

I would write a formal email to my manager along the lines of: As you know, I have decided to quit this company to pursue my personal career goals. I greatly appreciate your ongoing engagement to keep me on board, and it shows me how much the company values my work. Unfortunately, I have made my decision and committed myself elsewhere and I don’t break my ...


12

How to deal with a manager who keeps insisting to stay with no clear offer after I have already accepted another company offer? Be polite with him. It looks to me that he's making a real (although maybe a clumsy one) effort to keep you. Problem is, in the workplace is not always possible to do what one feels is good. He is feeling very likely much ...


28

How to deal with a manager who keeps insisting to stay with no clear offer after I have already accepted another company offer? Try something like: "Thank you. But no." Repeat as often as necessary.


87

You use the broken record method. Whatever they say, your answer is “I have given my notice, and my last day of work is the 6th of June”. If they ask why you are leaving you say “I have given my notice, and my last day of work is the 6th of June”. If they ask what it takes to make you stay you say “I have given my notice, and my last day of work is the 6th ...


5

One time, I had a boss who would scream at all his employees. The guy was a bully. He was extremely difficult to work for. One morning, he just wouldn't stop screaming at his secretary. And his secretary took a break, called HR to tell them she quit, and never came back. Now legally, she probably didn't have the right to do that because she still had her ...


14

He immediately told his boss, but he did not find any solution. I also know (informally) that some big boss asked why there is such a big attrition rate in that department (generally the company culture is great and the attrition rate is quite small), so managers are struggling to keep all folks in place. scheduled a few other 1:1 meetings to ...


29

You've accepted another offer, you've given your leave and you're moving on. There's nothing they can do about it. You don't need to tell them anything. If they ask where you're going you can simply say that you had 'another opportunity' and you've made up your mind. If they try to make offers to get you to say, you can simply thank them and decline to stay. ...


147

How to deal with a manager who keeps insisting to stay with no clear offer after I have already accepted another company offer? Politely without committing to anything. Once you hand in your resignation they have no way of forcing anything. If they want to spend that time having meetings instead of preparing handover that isn't your problem.


1

For anybody who is working for you (payed or unpayed) if you are unsure about their ability to invest the time required to meet the goals a conversation is in order. I would put it in terms of "Is this manageable? Is there any support that the organization can offer you to make this manageable?" and do your best to follow through on the requests. With a ...


5

Well, then don't ask questions which can be answered with "yes" or "no". Ask open questions instead. When you require information, explicitly state what information you require. If you are fishing for opinions or proposals, specifically say so. The question is not providing any specific examples or even what industry you are working in, so I can only guess. ...


2

Show, don't tell While lambshaanxy's answer is a good one, it doesn't apply to all cases. It applies in cases where upper management is open to improvement. But there are situations where upper management is either oblivious to or doesn't quite care about the workload of the staff (multiple levels down from them). I'm not implying malevolence here, just a ...


-2

Thank him. It's good to get a straight answer instead of having someone playing office politics give a bunch of double talk.


1

If you feel that you are impacted by lack of communication with this person, you should privately take up the issue with your manager. This sort of concern is their role and their headache, not yours. Then, if and when the time comes, also be prepared to listen.


14

Unless you are limited to only one question a day, you fix this with followup questions. Was it you who put that database change live this morning? Yes. Don't stop here! There must be a reason you asked. Consider this question sort of a topic-setter for what you want to talk about. Why did it go live this morning, when my calendar says it will be ...


-1

Two things should help you. Although it will take some persistence from you over few weeks. Give him the feedback 1:1. Call a meeting with agenda clearly mentioned and tell him politely. "I really like the advice you give me. At the same time I want to let you know that at times it does not remain a dialogue between us and may keep me away from being more ...


6

If I can share some of his burden (exchange tasks) (I prefer this), or If he also work for payment, so I can pay him Suggest option one, not two. If he's normally your sponsor, do not offer to pay him. We are in Vietnam (different cities). I can afford around $20. His day job is full-stack web dev. At that rate, you'd just insult him. Also, ...


-2

If you do the site and you're the owner, then invest a few dollars and host it yourself. Relying on people who don't get paid leaves you with very little cushion or leverage.


-1

You should change the question to get a different answer My day job actually offered BEST Instruments seminars around different communication styles to address this kind of friction. Your boss’ communication style is “technical” while yours seems to be “bold.” While ideally both parties will “flex” to meet the other’s style, as the one initiating the Q&...


0

Regardless of the power dynamic, there is absolutely nothing wrong with putting your hand up slightly and saying "Thanks, that's exactly what I needed." Often monologuers (apparently not a word) are going on because they think you don't know the full story and need it. If this is a common behavior, it is probably likely they've been "cut short" a number of ...


16

Simple: you explain what will happen and give them a choice. Boss, with only one resource on the team, Project Foo will take a year to complete. This will block Initiative Bar, so we won't be ready by the end of year, and this is likely to cost us up to $1M in sales. If I can hire another person, this would cost us $100,000 all in, but we could ...


0

I have encountered such people in my workplace a few times. They are good people and its actually their personality trait to go in the over explaining mode. I think sometimes you can avoid such lengthy discussion by finding the answers yourselves but other times you have to still ask the questions from same people. I think you can just wait for the moment ...


-1

Such people are more common than one might think, though the amount of talking they do varies. For some, it's an escape from work they don't want to do by spending time talking to you instead. That way they can feel like they are doing something productive, while not actually doing something. Others like to hear themselves talk, possibly so they can feel ...


5

What arguments would you use? If there is no budget then arguments won't work. The last manager was fired because he/she couldn't handle it, and you're headed down the same path unless you get proactive. You have two options:- Escalate the issue to the people who do have a budget. Job hunt. Best to do both. I really want to stay at the company. This ...


0

Is it worth addressing or just dropping / learning how to deal with it? Learn how to deal with it. He is your boss and the owner of the company. If he feels that your time is best spent listening to his answers to a question that you asked him then you need to accept that. Let him determine what the most productive use of his employees' time is. He is, ...


3

Yeah, it can be frustrating. Also the opposite is frustrating, which is when there is assumed knowledge, and the answer is very terse. What you could try is book-ending the question. For example: Instead of: What does XYZ stand for? Ask: It looks like data flows from Foo in XML format, then into XYZ, which then seems to convert it into JSON, ...


8

Tell your IT support. Let them know that you were cleaning and accidentally knocked a heavy object onto the screen. The computer is functional, you are able to work, but the screen is definitely damaged. Ask what you can do to help with getting it fixed. Accept responsibility and let them know. I've been in tech support for multiple years, and the ...


1

He often assigns me small insignificant tasks (minor code refactoring, UI improvements, etc). I always tell him that I'll get to them when I have time, because we all have actual urgent tasks that are requested by our clients or management (and I actually do fix those issues after dealing with more urgent work). However, he keeps nagging me about them, and ...


3

Your description is very thorough but there are some questions that you could answer to help formulate an answer. Like for example: How many people in your company? I'm assuming that if you're all working remote then the team is rather small. I also work in a software company that is mostly remote and some of the team dynamics are quite challenging, ...


1

Your supervisor may have already marked the report you submitted, so reuploading may make no difference. It will probably be time-stamped, so it will be obvious if he does check, and he's told you not to, so don't. If you give a presentation in the future, it's OK to talk about new information or corrections but you should make it clear that it is a change ...


1

You submitted late - this implies poor planning. Your supervisor has been generous in allowing a late submission, although you don’t mention if there are any penalties. Why would you expect to be able to change a submission at all, whether late or not? Your supervisor has clearly told you that you cannot make changes. When you present be careful of ...


1

Given that just changing the job is not an option, what is the best way to handle this? If it were me, I'd do the following: Determine what I actually needed to know to get my job done, as distinct from what I preferred to know Keep asking my boss how I can get the information I actually need In the cases where my boss still didn't provide the ...


1

There are a lot of good answers about how important communication is in tech and how some other humanities fields actually do have direct applications in STEM. I want to give a more general answer that expands upon a point that someone else touched upon. I feel that the question "When will I use this?" is usually asked by people who focus on the content and ...


0

Software Development Engineer here working at Amazon Web Services. Couple years ago I was considered for promotion but passed specifically because while I am considered a high-performance developer with a slew of complex projects delivered, my communication skills were not good enough for me to exert influence on other developers on the level sufficient for ...


-2

Meetings are a huge time sink. Surely they can be necessary, but only if they have a purpose for everyone involved and are run efficiently. Oddly, poorly timed scheduling may be the biggest problem. This SEI blog post has some actual data to back up what many of us already believed. https://insights.sei.cmu.edu/sei_blog/2020/05/stop-wasting-time-manage-...


2

Science and philosophy (a humanities subject) interact all the time without anyone even really realising it. If you are a Web dev, you are going to spend a decent amount of your time concerned about how websites look. Google fonts is a service almost entirely committed to improving the aesthetics of websites. To be honest, if you really wanted to be a world-...


4

The question reads as if you were hoping to find some justification for slacking off the courses you don't like.  Sorry to disappoint you! As just about all the other answers say, communication is really important in a technical career.  You'll need to communicate with at least some of: bosses, team leads, technical colleagues, non-technical colleagues, HR, ...


3

Do software developers ever use any skills not relating to STEM (Science, technology, engineering, mathematics) subjects? Based on long-time experience as a software engineer in Silicon Valley who advanced in the technical track and retired some years ago, I previously identified the following non-STEM specific skills in an answer on Computer Science ...


4

I'm an Internet Development Consultant (upper-level programmer) at a Fortune 100 Company. My degree was philosophy. I never took a computer science course in my life. Without question, my humanities background has helped me excel in the field of IT, especially now that I'm working on AI. Remember, computers were invented by a philosopher.


2

Most of what you learn in school, especially undergrad, has very tenuous relevance to your day to day work. There are many reasons for this: Lecture format is not suited to teaching many things well, classes are poorly designed, instructors are out of touch and don't have real investment in training you properly, we could go on. The point is, it is extremely ...


6

Do software developers ever use any skills not relating to STEM (Science, technology, engineering, mathematics) subjects? Maybe I'm not even a developer but combining software development with Linguistics got me an audience with a King, made me around 50K and currently has my software in 11 govt departments and every school in a country. The more strings ...


Top 50 recent answers are included