New answers tagged

1

I have a feeling that my manager is not happy with me. He did not say anything, but I believe this because I am not a high profile person and I don't like to show up and talk a lot. If your manager isn't happy with you but hasn't said anything, then it seems to me that it's your manager who needs to improve his/her communication skills. Still, maybe you're ...


47

It's perfectly reasonable to say to someone "Sorry to hear you're leaving. What's next for you?" in an appropriate environment, like a private personal conversation. They might not want to answer, or they might not know what's next. If they don't have something lined up and if this is someone you'd be willing to recommend (and it sounds from your post ...


7

This strikes me as the kind of question where if you have to ask, you probably know the answer. Let me illustrate: I've had a coworker who I knew pretty well walk up and tell me that tomorrow was their last day. I gasped, and reflexively asked what happened. We ended up getting lunch that day and spending the whole lunch our wading through the gory details ...


34

You can, but bear in mind they might not want to tell you. I'd say something along the lines of: Hey. Sorry to hear you're leaving, I'm sure you'll be missed. It took me by surprise when you told me earlier, do you mind me asking why? Completely understand if you don't want to share, I was just curious. Obviously change the wording depending on how ...


3

I'm interpreting your question to mean "how I can I improve my communication skills?" As you know, many job postings require "excellent written and spoken communication skills". That's not just boilerplate. It's tremendously meaningful. There are a few things you can do explicitly to teach yourself. Don't put yourself down too much. You probably are doing ...


5

First of all, you should not assume that your supervisor has a problem with you if he does not tell you. There are several things you could change. In a managing position, communication is one of the most important tools. You can only give information to other people, like your manager but also your team, if you communicate with them. If you have a problem ...


3

Supposing we have passed the trial period at work, and we've got hired. And after that, so, we are in front of the screen of our computer, we does nothing, we twiddle one's thumbs, we click randomly in the screen parts... What does we risk ? It depends on local laws, company customs, unions, etc. If you worked anywhere I have ever worked, you would ...


-2

A few days later someone inquired about the job who, after a quick Facebook search, turned out to be our new employee's boyfriend. Ignore knowledge from Facebook, don't do "quick facebook searches" as part of your hiring procedure. This is not reliable information at best. At worst it is outdated or even intentional sabotaging the other persons job chances. ...


10

Ask your team lead or manager who you should talk to. If you're new to the office, odds are that they're going to expect you to have questions. Ask your boss who you should ask them to; they'd be able to inform you who you should direct those work-related questions to; this might be them, but is likely going to be one of your more experienced coworkers. ...


6

You risk being on the list of people who do nothing of value for the company. This list is identical to the list of the first ones to go in case of trouble. Moreover it could also be that you manager will try to fire you anyway.


0

The product is usable and a delay can be explained by adding the new features. Go live and promise an upgrade. The client can surely live with a 1.5 second delay in the interim , as long as you promise a fix. As a customer, I am quiet used to hearing "the @~£$! computer is slow today", and getting my car 1.5 seconds sooner is not really going to cause me to ...


2

Should you tell people right away about a significant schedule change? Yes. Why? There's a principle of business and engineering excellence. The Principle of Least Surprise. Communicate to avoid surprising people. Always. If you make it known that you're facing a problem, it stops being just your problem. The people depending on you can plan ahead for ...


12

From the comments, you've clarified that the product is 100% usable. Therefore you have delivered it onetime. I would frame it, not as a bug but the potential to add value. I don't think there is any need to move the meeting forward, but it really depends on the relationship you have with the client and whether you think it will be really important. They ...


6

How I can properly suggest this to my team leader ? "Hey, boss, team X is using tool Y and it saves them Z hours every week". It's as simple as that. Do it in a chat, wait for a team meeting, send an email - only you know your boss & company culture, so only you can decide how to say it - but that's what to say. If you present a clear benefit (minus ...


6

TL;DR - Yes, you should follow up. 2 weeks is a long time. If the clinic said the report will be delivered by 2 working days, you should have made a check with the company about the receipt of the same by now (after 3-4 days). Right now you are assuming things: So it seems that the company already have the result.. But i still not have any offering , or ...


1

That’s what your one-to-one is there for. If you think your time is being wasted, then that’s where you tell her.


6

You're no longer in the first World, do not expect the same privileges and other stuff. On top of that you are a minority. Pushing against this guy too much will explode. He couldn't care less about you or your plans. Just that his agenda is satisfied. You making meetings is incredibly disrespectful to some people, you're just an intern. Having said that ...


4

Asking questions, and asking for explanations of things, is a legitimate management technique. It's effective at surfacing misunderstandings and confusion, especially when done in a group. It's also good for cross-training people, so Adam knows something about what Betty is doing and vice versa. In any project, engineers have two main audiences. One is ...


8

Stop telling him where you're going. He doesn't need to know that. You just need a vacation. That's it. If he asks, say that you haven't decided on all the particulars yet. That being said, don't make him any promise either. Your vacation is your vacation. You won't be available by phone, or by email. If he wants to play hardball and not even acknowledge ...


7

The issue I take with this is: While some of us enjoy teaching others (manager included), it takes up my and other team members’ time, without much benefit to the product - time which could be otherwise spent in development. Is the product owner okay with the time spent on the training? If your manager is that person, then clearly the answer is yes, ...


-3

Maybe I should just stop trying to explain these things via email, and insist on a phone call when there are complex issues that can't be explained with a simple yes or no. I much prefer email/IM though, because phone calls aren't logged and aren't searchable. This is an excellent point. After all internetworking is text based, yes? You are totally ...


12

My question is how should I approach my manager about this or even if I should? I suggest you approach your manager, in private, and try the following: Hello, manager. Last time I heard the product being described in a way I am not familiar with, and also mentioned some other features the product does not currently have. I feel like I am ...


0

You need to talk to him first. Start explaining to him how much you appreciate the conversations and explanations about these programming topics. Quote some parts of the conversation that you already had with him to show that you are paying attention on what he says to you. After that, just say to him that are some topics that you have knowledge enough to ...


0

I can share from my experience. I managed to slow down to the point that occasionally I am told to speed up. Unlike what others have said, you need to practice. The most important thing for the beginning is to be able to listen to yourself and "measure" the speed of your speech. You will need to train about it, it will not come easily at the first attempt. ...


3

she would call me to schedule my first shift but it's been 9 days and I'm supposed to be starting in 5 days and she still hasn't called me, what should I do? Communicate. Communication is the key. The ideal time to get in touch was yesterday, get in touch as soon as possible. If you have got a number, call them up. Otherwise, send an email politely ...


5

My boss at one job forgot that I was outside for an hour on my first day I was sitting in the lobby where I was told to wait. The assistant had told my boss that I was there, but in between leaving his office and coming to get me, someone needed him for something, after which he returned to his office. I had to give him a call to remind him that I was ...


3

“... he questions everything, makes me explain everything I do and every decision I make, explains everything to me (even the most basic stuff in the world he will spend ages explaining to me) and whenever I arrive at a conclusion he pretty much redoes all the work to validate it.” Sounds like he’s making attempts to coach/mentor you and trying to make sure ...


4

Example 1: not being paid on time, ever, but a random number of days after the date (e.g. contract says 27th, I get paid the following week). Do you have the contract in hand that says you will be paid on the 27th? Also keep in mind there are a lot of factors to consider here that could be out of your employer's hands. The 27th can fall on a weekend or ...


4

I suggest you talk to your senior person. They probably have the good intention of training you and helping you develop in your profession. Or, maybe they have a common superpower: explaining the obvious. In that case you can call them Captain Obvious. (joke) If you can stay calm for this conversation, that is best. You should consider asking, "what can I ...


3

How to handle a conversation where your manager does not address the evidence presented for a complaint or report? When reporting an issue you should, if possible, clearly state how you want this issue to be fixed. This will leave the manager fewer chances to wriggle their way out of unpleasant question (assuming a malevolent manager), or this will save ...


10

Not to be flippant, but the way to handle this is by getting a new job and quitting. Pay being consistently late is a pretty big red flag.


0

This is exactly my problem! Being average by whatever criteria you choose the only thing that falls out standard distribution is how fast I'm talking. And in the past I also was approached and asked to talk slower. What helped me is not talking slower but saying fewer things. I've just realized that if I'm analyzing a bit what I'm going to say and what's ...


2

I would take the following steps: Firstly, and perhaps most obviously, you may need to just buckle down and practice talking slowly. When you've got a whole lot of information in your brain and you feel the need to get it out, human speech can seem like a frustrating bottleneck. But you have to keep in mind that even if you talk fast, that doesn't mean ...


7

You don't have to consciously try to slow down. What you have to do is interact with the people you are talking to, instead of just talking. As you make points in your talk, look at the listeners. Look at their reactions. If they aren't reacting, pause and wait for some response: a nod, a question, etc. By doing this you'll learn to deliver ...


3

If an in-house recruiter of a 'fairly well known company' doesn't follow up and keeps his promises, there are three options I can think of now: Forget about it and deal with them as @Charmander explains in his answer. Get in contact with the recruiter again hoping he will keep his promises (unlikely). If you really would like to work there, you can bypass ...


1

Ignore him and remove him from your network so you don't have to deal with this recruiter ever again. I'd also add their number to my contact list and tag them with a keyword such as "avoid" or similar, so if they call you, you know you should ignore that call. Be mindful that someone else from that company might call you with that number, so perhaps if they ...


2

(1) no notifications to distract here while working; This makes the assumption that notifications aren't part of "working". (2) no temptation to check emails and messengers on the principle "out of sight - out of mind"; This sounds like you don't trust your employees! (3) employees would have to apply more discipline into communication - they would ...


8

Having occasionally had to do development on airgapped computers at a defense company, I'd say no. The hassle from not getting the occasional high priority message as quickly and the round about data transfer methods needed whenever I did need to move (permissible) data from one to the next was far more painful than the lower distraction rate. Besides ...


3

how would you address 'urgent' emails? from personal experience: i focus on my work and sometimes only read my emails at the end of the day. and then i realize that someone was expecting an answer to continue his work... also, my boss sometimes comes to my desk and say 'read your emails. i sent you a message 30 minutes ago'. i think this communication is ...


6

I know what it feels like if someone speaks way too fast. It is hard to follow because a lot of information comes to you in a short time and words are likely spoken unclear if someone speaks really fast. In these cases I thought at least they could make a short break every now and then, it would give me some time to sort out the many words a little better. ...


0

I am not sure what kind of questions you are asking but it sounds like the other person probably considers them to be frivolous. If your skills match the job posting then you apply; simple. If they want to interview you then it usually starts with a phone call and during that time you can vent anything which you think would disqualify you from the position....


1

This needs a little more clarity. What kind of email and who are you sending to? If the email's are send to someone withing in you organization (internal) and are related to something you need from the recipient then then of course you expect a response. Send a second request (maybe cc their supervisor) or even pick up the phone and call. Now for those "...


2

Isn't considered impolite and unprofessional not to answer emails Wouldn't have been more professional to just answer with a quick "I'm sorry. I'm busy now. Contact me in a couple of days." or something like that? Yes, but the costs of mild unprofessionalism are extremely low to the individual, especially when the person they are corresponding with is ...


5

This one is easy to answer: With a permanent job, you will of course not be leaving. Without a permanent job, you will feel free to look around. (Having a permanent job will of course not stop you from doing what’s best for you, but you don’t have to tell them that).


0

You told your employer (via your boss) that you may be resigning in a few (eight) months. Your decision to resign depends on you passing (or not) the exam. In the meantime, you would like to enjoy the benefits of a full-time position. Since you are studying for the IELTS, as you said, you're probably familiar with the saying: "You can't have your cake and ...


-1

In the comments you mention that you either become permanent or your contract will end. That leaves you with three options: Choose between your job and school in Australia Lie. Tell them you've given up on Australia and then stop talking about Australia around coworkers. If you get accepted, then you can choose Australia, but this will probably burn ...


5

Do not try to "overstep" into their responsibilities, rather ask them how you can be of help while they are away from work. Send an email saying that: "Hey Boss, have a great conference ahead [from date X to Y]. In the meantime, if you need anything to be taken care of related to the project, other than the planned work, please let me know. I'll be happy ...


1

According to me, "Oversee" would be a strong word to use. Just ask them whether you can look into the different processes involved in the project. Since, both of them are not present currently, you can mention about the high priority of the tasks involved in the project as a reason to look into the project. You can also mention that this will help you to ...


13

I would advise not doing so, at least not publicly. It might make you feel better but it only makes you look negative. Basically it would look like you're whinging about them not hiring you. (I am not saying you are but that's how it might look) Would hitting back really make you feel better? I would suggest trying to view it as a positive. You put time ...


4

One of their employees, who is senior in the company, has reached out to me to ask to come to my university campus to sell their consultancy to my university society members. I did not say no yet. Why would they approach you? Does this require your permission? Wouldn't this be something he/she would approach the university about to get permission? ...


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