New answers tagged

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Is this typical protocol and how meetings are conducted? There is no protocol here. Even if you had a formal moderation, nobody keeps someone from saying stuff that is obviously rhetoric. Communication is hard. Entire coaching industries exist where people go around and try to teach us how to lead productive conversations. There are so many archetypes of ...


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You can always use a neutral comment that sounds positive, without necessarily agreeing: Thanks for explaining that, you expressed the point about xyz really well... however... Great input - it's beneficial to everyone here that you explained that... however... Very informative comments, thanks for bringing that up... however... Then you can continue and ...


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Is this typical protocol and how meetings are conducted? This is very much dependent on company and local culture. I've certainly worked in places where this is the norm--everyone wants to be agreeable. No one wants to stir the pot and risk upsetting or alienating others by being contradictory. I've also seen the opposite extreme, where people go out of ...


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I have recently begun doing this myself this past year as a deliberate strategy to deal with an exceptionally difficult person in a position of authority above me on our organization chart. I thought that meetings are supposed to be about communicating with a team to get on the same page, address concerns and issues, and solve problems This is only one ...


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These conversations can be healthier if all involved recognize the difference between disagreeing with an idea and disagreeing with the person who said it. A healthy culture also expects evidence, rather than expressions of opinion. "You have made some good arguments, but we also have to consider these figures ..."


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In the uses you describe, it is essentially a formality indicating acknowledgement rather than actual agreement. It is part of a wide repertoire of modern office verbiage - and like most of these it serves primarily to communicate subtle gradations of tone and mood (e.g. on the spectrums of respect, enthusiasm, hesitation, dismissal, friendship, hostility, ...


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I think I'm guilty of doing this. For instance, if someone just made a proposal that I mostly disagree with. Instead of starting my rebuttal by saying, "I disagree, I think we should...", which might completely shut down the other person who just made the proposal. I will usually try to find a part of the proposal I can agree with and start with ...


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Yes, I would let the review stand. I don't think this is a fight you can win. The performance review is too vague and unfortunately, there seems to be nothing factually wrong with it. The fact is, your boss is the one who gets to decide all of those standards. For instance, you don't get to decide if a question is basic, your boss does. So even if you ...


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Sometimes it's a cultural thing. Some people think it is rude to contradict people, even when they disagree. So they prefix their disagreement with supportive statements of agreement because that's the appropriate approach in regards to their cultural context. Stephen Fry has a piece contrasting US and British dinner parties. If someone at a British dinner ...


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Agreeing without really agreeing can have a variety of causes. There are just those who just misunderstood what the other person was saying and thought they were agreeing to something else. There are those who are agreeing because they aren't paying attention and need to say something. Been there and done that. There are those who are agreeing because ...


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It really depends on the culture that has been created within the company/company unit, end goals, the importance of said topic to the big picture, the perceived rank/skillsets of the people involved in the meeting, and the comfort of the individuals involved with the others around and/or public speaking. Typically Shy people are going to agree and avoid ...


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Dealing with a bad performance review is unpleasant but simple & straight forward Don't argue. It's pointless. This IS the perception of your manager, whether you like it or not Ask your manager for help and how to improve. Create an actionable plan with quantitative metrics that you both agree on. Then track the plan preferably in weekly one-on-one ...


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I would argue the damage is done It is very hard to change their minds once they have made them up. "Reasons" seem like "excuses" and the comments being quite general and opinion based rather than concrete with clear examples of error point to someone who is not all that evidence driven anyway. It doesn't help that you are not the ...


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First, with most larger/professional companies, HR is already very involved with the performance review process. This is especially true with the negative reviews. At my company, every performance review will get read by HR or a manager a step above. Second, HR's job is to limit and mitigate risk and exposure for the company. They do this by ensuring the ...


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From your question I can see the main cause of both problems you face. You're overly verbose when communicating. You could have cut this question in half and still had too much. If this is the style your manager and colleague are seeing I'm not surprised the latter doesn't want to assist you and the former has lost interest. Some people have little patience ...


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From what you have described the problem is not with the tooling. SPSS modeler uses Python and you can code in Python for it. But the tool is intended to reduce complexity of coding and ease of deployment. Switching to Python/R because lack of how to use the full features of a tool is not a good reason to switch. If you want buy in from management you would ...


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They do not need it and are happy what they have and also - to my surprise - with what they are currently doing. There you have it. Your team is happy with what they are doing and their tools work well enough by them. You must prove to them your methods are better or necessary. Heliocentrism had this problem too— it was the better theory, but it took along ...


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In addition to the already good answers provided, I would like to cover the scenario where you don't manage to get ANY answer before Monday. It seems obvious but in that case, certainly don't stay at home waiting for an answer, choose one of both offices, and go there. 4 possibilities here: You're in the right office. Nice! You're in the wrong office. Too ...


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Find phone number of the most HR-like contact you have at your new employer. 1a. If you don't have a number, use the main number listed on their website. Phone said number. Explain that you're starting on Monday but haven't heard any details. Respond appropriately to any questions you're asked. Most likely, you've either slipped through a crack somewhere or ...


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Don't drown in a glass of water. Send them an e-mail or pick up the phone and call them. Spending 5 minutes now to answer that question will save them and you much more time on Monday, should you show up at the wrong reception. Simply ask where and when are you supposed to show up on Monday, office A or office B? HR are usually always very busy and it can ...


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Public shoutouts at least can be a good idea. My employer does them, and it makes me feel more engaged, connected, and situationally aware. Here are some implementation details that might make a difference. Our shoutouts don't come from the top down. The people praising each other are rank-and-file peers, or, at least, people nearby each other in the ...


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I didn't mention it during the interview that I was actually applying for a different position. Why not? You should have done this right there, so you don't waste your time in an interview for a position you don't want. Guess that this is something you should keep in mind for future interviews. Would it be wise explain the situation in my follow-up email ...


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The fact that they are "not rational" may not have much saying with the success of the company, lot's of companies are run by idiots, even very successful ones. The fact that they are superstitious also doesn't mean: they're going to default on your payments; they're going to deny good money, I've seen non superstitious people deny offers for ...


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Whatever you do, you frame it in terms of the negative impact to the business. I have to be blunt. Your boss does not care about fairness. They are not a referee at a sporting match. They care about results. They don't care who gets the sale done, if it gets done. Your example seems like they picked up the phone, heard the spoke with the customer and got it ...


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TL;DR Create a group where people can only listen, If you can. I am not sure if it's ok to answer a 3 year old question. Since there are no accepted answers, I am doing it anyway. Let me start by saying our ancestors used to communicate and get ready to face danger by screaming especially in groups. Humans are social animals (well most of them) and you won't ...


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I'm going to go against the grain here and say I have had good experiences with public callouts. I think giving genuine thanks does create a positive workplace culture. However if you are currently in a workplace culture where you keep your head down unless the boss comes to yell at you, it could be a bit of a culture shock. Here are a few examples from my ...


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I think a lot of workplaces tend to believe that praising work publicly is a great idea. Ultimately, I feel like places that do this tend to be a bad place to work at. The reason being is that they tend to have high attrition or all time lower morale. The question I have in reverse is how do you handle employee reviews? Do you give them raises frequently? Do ...


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I thought back to my time as a cog in a Fortune-500 company and this set off "it's a trap!". It's for fun now, but at some point management will decide to count shout-outs and include that on performance reviews. My paranoid co-workers would have immediately arranged an informal mutual shout-out network -- "you guys are so willing to help I'm ...


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Big companies are very cautious, often with good reason. They won't allow untrusted software to be installed on machines. They won't like their intellectual property downloaded to machines they have no control over. If you're a big target, then hackers are a constant problem, not some theoretical threat that happens to other people. If you can't live with ...


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A manager one time was passing on a bit of wisdom to me. If they ask me to saw this table in half, and will not give me a saw, but only this pen, I'll do it, but I will be very clear about how long it will take me. If they're good with that, then I'll get going. Explain the limitations, ask for accommodation. Be concise, precise, and detailed. Quantify, ...


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How can I discuss with manager that current setup in effecting my performance and ability to do tasks, I know his answer will be that is that the best we can do, should I discuss or start looking else where? Still, send a formal meeting invite, have the conversation, describe the pain points and note the provided answers, then send a MoM email after the ...


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Since you're looking for actual evidence, I'd suggest you look at books written or inspired by Edwards Deming, the father of just-in-time manufacturing He found that individual incentives had potentially negative effects within organizations. Instead, he emphasized collective incentives or team incentives, over individual incentives. For instance at Toyota, ...


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My employer does something similar. It is called "Partner Points"; it is run by Achievers. Each month, every employee is given 500 points to award to any other employee they wish, publicly. Points accumulate over time and can be redeemed for various goods (think of a credit card rewards program). The employer, of course, pays monthly for the ...


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Although I haven't worked anywhere that does public-shut-outs via Slack, I have worked at companies which didn't publicly acknowledge success, companies which did acknowledge success in a not particular fair way, and a company which did it in (I think) a fair way. When there was no public acknowledgment of success, I didn't feel particularly engaged with the ...


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Is a public “shoutouts” channel a good or bad idea? It's a bad idea. A terrible one. Same as "employee of the month", for the reasons you yourself have mentioned. I've had personal experience with these in small companies, and most of the time the wrong (or popular) employees get the credit, and the hard working ones go unnoticed. This leads to ...


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I used to work for a very large US based company that used to pride itself in having a very large number of Engineers. It would constantly boast about the large numbers and how technically excellent it was - this was to the outside world. Internally there were regular town hall meetings that were delivered on various levels - Corporate, Business unit, ...


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Management should be open and transparent to an employee about his/her performance, and relate praise when it has been given/deserved. When an employee does well, others should message that employee directly and/or message that employee's manager. In an ideal world managers would have full insight into everything their employees are doing, good and bad. ...


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I would agree with your points that it may have unintended effects for the employees, and potentially even bring liability to the company if there's ever a complaint about management favoring one employee or discriminating against others. By announcing your support of a given employee's performance publicly, you're putting out public data that can be counted ...


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"Public, peer-to-peer shoutouts?" I will very candidly say that you will very soon regret that idea. "Some people legitimately don't like public callouts, even if they are well intentioned." (obvious comment omitted) "Stick to business!" Whatever business you are in. Don't focus on "what other team members say they ...


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When dealing with people who are not rational, you have to consider "what is the most irrational thing that could possibly happen here?". To which the answer is more or less limitless, so you have to account for that. Let's say the company gets off the ground and is making some small amount of money, enough to pay the bills but not much more than ...


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Totally agreed with Phillip Kendall that you should run away. However, I'd like to add one thing. It sounds like you're at the start of this business and right now money is good because the owner probably has a lot saved up/borrowed. At some point, it's going to dry up and you'll be stuck looking for a job. My thought is you should stick around until at ...


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Most startups fail, particularly those with innovative and creative ownership or payment strategies instead of innovative and creative products. Owners like this are best avoided altogether.


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They are heavily superstitious folks and based many if not all decisions from advises by psychic, shaman, medium of sort. Run away as fast as you can to somewhere which isn't run by idiots. This business will fail, it's just a question of whether it's today, tomorrow, next month or next year.


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If the vibe was positive and you really liked the company or the people you met, then you could just send a short email saying thank you for the time and the opportunity, and maybe hoping for a future collaboration together. Then leave it at that. As Kilisi mentioned in his answer this might be just a polite platitude. People sometimes don't like being ...


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This is just a polite platitude because it's vague and open ended. If they really wanted you to keep in contact they would have been more specific.


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My instinctive response to the OP's very-long response is ... "I don't think you're seeing things clearly right now, even if you think you do." Talk to your manager, if you can, or talk to HR. However: "talk to someone, as soon as possible." Also: "when you find yourself seemingly-trapped in 'a situation like this,'" it can ...


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Recently X has shown clear signs of irritation towards me. There was an incident where I asked for more information about how to do a job, and I was given that information and completed it (or so I thought). I had forgotten that one of the 'jobs' on the system was a fake job that was just a link to a document that acted as a specification for all the other ...


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Your question is really long, and I think it might actually be several questions. I will focus on how to improve your relationship with X. It seems like X is not having a problem with you specifically, which is good. Also it seems that both sides would like to improve the communication, which can also be helpful for a solution. I would do the following ...


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Informing the company How can I update the CTO that these things should be done before a new hire so they can get on with understanding and working without raising eyebrows that 3 days into new role and he is telling us our issues? You already are: Meanwhile I have been asked daily for the report and I say to them that the team is working on fixing the ...


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I been asked daily for the report and I say them the team is working on fixing the issue about making it work but I cannot see the website. This is all you can do. Refer them to the team who's job is creating the issue and ask for any suggestions on what you can do in the meantime.


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