217

What your manager says is nonsense. What he apparently wants is "bums on seats". A nice quote from some top manager at Microsoft: "You can make people stay in the office 80 hours a week. You can't make them work more than 40 hours a week". Working more than 40 hours a week decreases productivity, and not productivity per hour, but productivity per week. ...


208

You've witnessed something illegal. By law, you are most likely required to report it to a federal agency, not your supervisor's boss. In other words, having told the boss, you haven't actually done anything to protect yourself legally. In fact, you may be considered complicit. The simplest solution is to forget about getting along with these folks, and ...


183

A wiser man than me said “You can make people stay in the office for 80 hours a week, but you can’t make them work more than 40 hours a week.” That’s the problem you are running into, and there’s nothing you can do. People come to the office because you pay them. They work because they want to. And you know why these people have no motivation to work.


180

Here's a Harvard Business Review study on why diverse teams outperform homogeneous teams. Diverse teams are more innovative and focus on facts better than homogeneous teams. However, it's not as simple as throwing a bunch of different people together and hoping that things work out, as this article points out. Now if you're interested in something beyond ...


152

I work in a big IT company (100.000+ employee). Here is what I was told from an HR representative when I was promoted as a manager: We need to hire smart and talented people. Smart and talented people can come from any background, including diverse gender, diverse sexualities, diverse skin color, diverse level of disability, etc... If a division of ...


140

I've done a lot of interviews in the relatively short time (around 7 years) in the industry. One thing I learnt is that if you sense something not quite right, trust your instinct and don't progress further. I learnt it the hard way: when I was close to your level, there was an opportunity to move up. However, the interviewer kept asking me: what will you ...


133

My main problem is this: I have no idea how to navigate the corporate world My life as a minor celebrity is over and I want to move on and work as a regular person, but this is proving to be surprisingly difficult. What can I do to remain professional and try to get people to forget my somewhat famous background? You are in an entry level job. ...


128

The previous answers are very optimistic. However, the truth is the answer to your question depends a lot on: the country you are in, the state of your skin, the industry and your role. Normally, the safest option in terms of your career is for your look to correspond to other women's looks in the industry and country you work in. You can try not to ...


114

This is a great question, and last time I checked (which was admittedly a long time ago), the psychological literature doesn't have a definitive answer. So I checked again. The Industrial/Organizational Psychologist has a thorough, relatively recent article on Arrogance (PDF) and its impact on the workplace. One of the most interesting things in the article ...


113

is it poor office etiquette to display/mention signs of "relative" wealth when I know others are struggling? Given that you are not doing it with the intention to brag or boast (it comes up naturally in a conversation), then it's ok. Sometimes, people can take naive or honest things one says the wrong way, but there is few to nothing you can do to ...


105

The general problem here is that the "merit" in meritocracy needs to be measured in some quantitative way. It's not an objective or absolute quantity. Organizations or teams that have a blind spot are often not aware that they have a blind spot and hence they won't be able to fill it. Diversity helps you to broaden your definition of merit and create more ...


102

I think there are already answers covering many aspects, but if you're looking for a good response to this emotional manipulation, you could maybe say something like that: If I am not rested, I cannot work focused, more errors sneak in, and that is irresponsible! So I take responsibility, go home and try to sleep well!


97

Personally, I believe that overdressing is never an issue. Wearing a suit may be overkill if the position has already been offered, but perhaps khaki slacks and a button-up shirt would be ideal. No need for the full suit and tie treatment, but formal enough to continue a good impression and appear professional. Growing up as the son of an HR Director, he ...


97

Going anon for this answer... I think I can speak from experience. Not nearly as famous as "5-10% of the US" famous, but when I entered my current large-sized company, probably 500+ people knew me by name and face within the first week, including people from other branches and whom I'd never met. Invitations to events weekly and dining at the CEO table ...


92

It sounds like you bit off a bit more than you can chew, so to speak, when applying to a fitness company which promotes a healthy lifestyle. Sounds like these people take it SERIOUSLY. While there is no excuse for insulting you in the workplace for anything like this and they're a bit over the line in my opinion, in this case it sounds like everyone does ...


85

Are they allowed to force me to do overtime at no extra pay? This really depends on your local laws, your employment contract, and your status as an employee, none of which can really be determined here. Your best bet, should you really want an answer for this, is to consult a lawyer. What is more concerning is that your employer appears to have no concern ...


82

I'm a senior technical architect, female (and umm, not in my early twenties any more), and I really only wear makeup if I'm going into meetings with our larger clients where I need to be more formal. Day to day, I just don't wear it. It costs a bomb and looks crappy by the end of the day unless you spend significant amounts of time either preparing ...


81

Something to think about: do you have any reason to believe the boss isn't also doing illegal things? That's the reason that these answers are not paranoid, and you really really need to talk to a lawyer, or at the very least, an actual whistleblower organization. Because if the boss was "in on it" and doing illegal things alongside your supervisor, you've ...


78

This sounds like blatant workplace bullying. Forget for a moment that this is a fitness company, and just take all the affront's you've had to suffer. People make comments about how I'm ruining my "macros" There's also wildly snide remarks about some sort of syrup in my soda I brought some Cheetos to a office party, to find out that everyone brought veg ...


75

During phone screens, and the entire interview process, both candidate and company are trying to show themselves in a positive light. If the manager says "40-45. There probably are some people who do exactly 40" ... the literal meaning is "everyone works overtime as far as I know". Assume that this is a positive spin on the actual situation. I ...


74

I work in an open office setting where all of my co-workers just do it at their desk. It's a prescribed medication, you aren't doing anything wrong and there is no need to hide it. If someone asks what it is, you can either tell them (if you feel comfortable doing so) or just say "it's my medication" and leave it at that. You may want to check with your ...


74

Do I need to be arrogant to get ahead? No, never. Can you get ahead in the corporate world without being 'arrogant' and acting with an over inflated ego? Yes, always. There is a difference between arrogance and being straightforward or truthful (vs. being diplomatic or "politically correct"), some seem to confuse these. I like to get work done, and ...


72

If you're only going in to sign the contract, you've won the war already. Your employer won't change their mind about hiring you at the last minute just because you show up dressed like everyone else rather than in a suit. You're fine.


59

The way your employer treats people benefits nobody. They might get unpaid overtime from their staff but that is likely to result in poor morale, low quality work and a high turnover of staff (along with the cost/time required to train replacements). In the long term, I think you need to push to change your employer's mindset. They are unlikely to ...


56

Given that you are in Pennsylvania, this situation may be covered by the Pennsylvania Whistleblowers Act, which says in part: “No employer may discharge, threaten or otherwise discriminate or retaliate against an employee regarding the employee’s compensation, terms, conditions, location or privileges of employment because the employee or a person acting ...


46

How do I get over this feeling of not having accomplished enough when the people I am comparing myself to sit just around me? The simple answer is to stop comparing your self to others. This is really the only way to conquer this issue. People who have made a bit of money, especially as a group, will tend to talk about it. Be happy for them because ...


40

I would set up a meeting with your manager to discuss this. I would be point blank: Boss, I am working and meeting all the demands expected. I complete all the assigned tickets/tasks on time and in completion. I am not clear on what you mean that I should work more than 40 hours. I am meeting expectations and do not believe I need to do more than 40 hours ...


38

People will randomly stop me in the office (I work in a huge office with a ton of people) and shout "OMG!!! It's actually !!!" Today I got mobbed by a group who wanted selfies with me while I was heading to my boss's office to try to explain why I didn't get anything for the past week. This is really an opinion question, so here's mine. The mods may close ...


37

The key to maintaining professionalism is keeping the details out of it. I'm looking for a newer car (about 3-4 years old; mine is 11 years old) which some of my peers would perceive as a luxury (I'm not going to ask them anything about cars, but it will be seen when I buy it and arrive in the car park). There is nothing you can do about it, ...


35

I really want to tell you that makeup doesn't matter, but that would be bending the truth. The shade of your lipstick and whether or not you wear mascara is inconsequential as long as you don't overdo it. You cannot "underdo" the nude look. But in case of acne your skin makes you look younger to most people (because acne is attributed to teenagers). This ...


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