New answers tagged

0 votes

Dealing with manager that has high turnover but great reviews from departing engineers

IMHO, Bradley is on the right track for HIS carrier. Whether its aligned with your company employee strategy or not. He is building a personal support structure using your company resources. As i see ...
user avatar
  • 12.6k
1 vote

Dealing with manager that has high turnover but great reviews from departing engineers

Outsource him and his department to a subsidiary company which you then hire on a contract base to provide the services they were providing before. Ridiculous proposal? Please hear me out: You don't ...
user avatar
  • 37.1k
-2 votes

Dealing with manager that has high turnover but great reviews from departing engineers

Eliminate his training budget. I was just going to upvote Tony's answer, because it mentions this in passing, but I think it needs to be its own answer, and needs to be spelled out a little more. I'm ...
user avatar
-2 votes

Dealing with manager that has high turnover but great reviews from departing engineers

I wouldn't normally post here but I think you can use what I have to say. First of all, let me say that a lot of the already existing answers seem undoubtedly biased and assuming a lot of things, in ...
user avatar
3 votes

Dealing with manager that has high turnover but great reviews from departing engineers

and Bradley told the manager, in clear terms, "F*** off! That's a waste of time, and the whole team knows it. My job is to have this team excel and make a ****-load of $$ for the company, and to ...
user avatar
  • 2,802
2 votes

Dealing with manager that has high turnover but great reviews from departing engineers

While Bradley is a "net plus" for our organization, he seems to be angering enough of the higher-ups that we may have to let him go due to his negative impact on the morale of management. Is ...
user avatar
  • 134
6 votes

Dealing with manager that has high turnover but great reviews from departing engineers

You need to get to the bottom of why people are leaving and not, instead, asking for (or getting) a raise from the current company. If they are learning new (relevant) skills and getting meaningful ...
user avatar
  • 236
4 votes

Dealing with manager that has high turnover but great reviews from departing engineers

Very interesting question. There is definitely two sides to this: There is mention of Bradley spending company money on training of his subordinates whom then leave. Bradley is identified as a ...
user avatar
  • 1,506
14 votes

Dealing with manager that has high turnover but great reviews from departing engineers

Some of the other answers seem to be trying to answer the question "Should Bradley be fired". It's an easy obvious answer "No", and the questioner knows it. So let's try to answer ...
user avatar
10 votes

Dealing with manager that has high turnover but great reviews from departing engineers

What happened eight times is that Bradley turned an average engineer into a good one that you would want to keep, and each time instead of keeping them, you let them go and they complain about Bradley’...
user avatar
  • 156k
24 votes

Dealing with manager that has high turnover but great reviews from departing engineers

A lot of the other answers are helpful, but in my opinion, they are dodging the real issue. Your departing employees are telling you exactly why they are leaving. Occam's razor likely applies here; it ...
user avatar
  • 351
11 votes

Dealing with manager that has high turnover but great reviews from departing engineers

So you're telling me you have a guy who can turn all of his subordinates into kickass engineers, who love and respect their manager, but who nonetheless leave the because of incompetent leadership (...
user avatar
18 votes

Dealing with manager that has high turnover but great reviews from departing engineers

Is there any way to get this guy to smarten up? It looks like Bradley is plenty smart already. The ones who need to smarten up is the company leadership. If good people are leaving in bulk than you ...
user avatar
  • 93.3k
41 votes

Dealing with manager that has high turnover but great reviews from departing engineers

Bradley isn't the problem here. You've got a guy who works very well personally, gets great results in terms of productivity from his team and trains them well. And they all like him personally and ...
user avatar
  • 1,566
50 votes

Dealing with manager that has high turnover but great reviews from departing engineers

Your company sucks at retaining talent. Look into that before looking into anything related to Bradley. Fix that and you will fix good people leaving your company but loving their direct manager. ...
user avatar
  • 4,515
41 votes

Dealing with manager that has high turnover but great reviews from departing engineers

Are you sure you are trying to fix the right issue? Why are you focusing on Bradley and not on the lack of retention ? All the people leaving were kind enough to give you a clear answer of why they ...
user avatar
  • 5,474
4 votes

Dealing with manager that has high turnover but great reviews from departing engineers

"F*** off! That's a waste of time, and the whole team knows it. My job is to have this team excel and make a ****-load of $$ for the company, and to develop my subordinates so they can make more $...
user avatar
2 votes

How to politely ask an employee to avoid *personal* texting during meetings?

It seems I'm more direct than most in this sort of situation. In my opinion the behavior is occurring in public so it's okay to address tactfully in public. I would say something like, "If that ...
user avatar
-1 votes

How to politely ask an employee to avoid *personal* texting during meetings?

Is the meeting really 10 minutes or is it running longer? Sounds like people say their bit and other coworker's reports are not important so the first ones tune out. Do you need this meeting at all? ...
user avatar
  • 2,134
2 votes

How to politely ask an employee to avoid *personal* texting during meetings?

While a policy revolving around the specific behavior may be the answer here, there is another way to look at this than that behavior. While most people understand what scrums are, they can be vastly ...
user avatar
  • 170
21 votes

How to politely ask an employee to avoid *personal* texting during meetings?

Slight frame challenge: You are doing this person no favors in the career development process by continuing to allow this to slide. What they are doing is, quite simply, rude. While you may have ...
user avatar
  • 5,676
9 votes

How to politely ask an employee to avoid *personal* texting during meetings?

I'm going to take a different approach and ask why a team member is able to look at their phone and not be engaged with the stand-up if it is only 10 minutes. The things people are saying should be ...
user avatar
  • 9,534
1 vote

How to politely ask an employee to avoid *personal* texting during meetings?

I'd say that you can inform the whole team to simply use more discretion with cell phones during meetings. This way, you don't single anyone out. Observe the employee you've mentioned for maybe a ...
user avatar
  • 35.9k
4 votes

How to politely ask an employee to avoid *personal* texting during meetings?

Interrupt the meeting and draw attention to the phone use. A: (starts typing on the phone while soneone else is talking) Manager: (turning to A) Has something important come up? Should we interrupt ...
user avatar
  • 3,695
42 votes

How to politely ask an employee to avoid *personal* texting during meetings?

We used to have a problem with a guy who always put his phone on the table and looked at it, expecting it to ring. If it did he'd answer, and say "This is important" and leave the room. ...
user avatar
  • 3,091
32 votes
Accepted

How to politely ask an employee to avoid *personal* texting during meetings?

As a former Scrum Master, I would just do this privately. Doing it in public during a sprint review or something similar can a) be considered to be criticizing in public (especially when everyone ...
user avatar
7 votes

How to politely ask an employee to avoid *personal* texting during meetings?

I'm going to assume, as you used "daily standup" that you do some sort of scrum-style thing. If so, a good time to bring this up is at a retrospective, or maybe you could go over your "...
user avatar
  • 1,762
73 votes

How to politely ask an employee to avoid *personal* texting during meetings?

I'd go with this: Mentioning this "casually". I'm worried that it might feel like I'm intruding into their personal life Have a word with them privately and say that you need them to focus ...
user avatar
  • 97.2k
5 votes

How to politely ask an employee to avoid *personal* texting during meetings?

Are you their manager or in the line management structure? If so, taking them casually to one side and asking them not to shouldn't be an issue. If they take offence then there is a bigger issue about ...
user avatar
3 votes

How do you assert your preference for written communication?

I am so in the same boat - except I have a hearing impairment that gives me a bit of extra leverage. My advice would be along the same lines as nvoigt's (aka Comey's defense aka contemporaneous notes):...
user avatar
12 votes

How do you assert your preference for written communication?

You cannot. If your boss wants to have a chat with you, they will have a chat with you. You can insist on a summary in writing, but that should be exceedingly rare. I have insisted on getting orders ...
user avatar
  • 115k

Top 50 recent answers are included