New answers tagged

2

Memes are a more modern take on proverbs, idioms and sayings. using a meme in casual conversation is no different from saying something at work like: Can't have your cake and eat it too He's an Einstein When in Rome... What's good for the goose... Not everyone knows every saying either. Should you learn proverbs to communicate at work? It's not a ...


21

It's been said a few times in the comments, but it really deserves its own answer: When a new thing comes up for you, just search for it on Urban Dictionary. There's no need to spend weeks or months immersing yourself in TikTok, Instagram, or massively multiplayer video games. Just look it up on that site and in a few seconds, you'll know, and can move on ...


-5

Thanks to @IllusiveBrian's contribution, we have learned that many memes you encounter may originate from video games. Most of these culture-forming games are played online, allowing a large number of participants to form teams and fight against an other team. They engage in live chat all the while, forming strategies, as well as basking in and inventing ...


5

Consider the memes as part of the local dialect - are you required to learn it? Nope. Should you learn it? It probably is in your best interest as it could allow you to communicate with the locals in their own language. If someone said something you don’t understand, then ask them what the meme means if our old friend google doesn’t give a straight/...


11

If you want to engage with your coworkers, you could ask them what they mean when they say things you don't understand. This is a good habit anyway, since they may be talking about something important even if it sounds like nonsense. They may try to explain what they're saying enough so that you at least understand what they meant, or might realize that ...


1

I think it would be case by case, by honestly. If during the time you leave the company, you keep contact and have a good relationship with your boss, then there is no doubt about that. I have heard a case that a person come and left the company for 3 times. But in this case, the company don't care about people come and go, they just need people work at the ...


1

I work for a company where this is not uncommon. I've quite a number of coworkers who left the company for various reasons and later returned (often because it turned out that the grass isn't greener on the other side). Our previous CTO often quipped "you're allowed to make a mistake" about this practice. Of course, not every company looks at this ...


1

Really this is why professional networking sites like linkedin exist but if you don't have that then reach out with an email. I would check their careers page first though as if they don't have a suitable role on the careers page is highly unlikely they'll just invent one for you. However, I do not know how the company and my boss would look at this ...


4

my boss told me he is always open to hearing from me regarding working for them again. That could be just a polite thing to say. They could mean it, or they may not mean it. I'm sure the first question would be "what if Bob leaves us again in another 4 months"? That will be a question that goes through your old bosses head. Be prepared to answer ...


2

Despite that, my boss told me he is always open to hearing from me regarding working for them again. Considering that your boss said they're open to hearing from you, just contact them directly (if they still work there) and tell them you're open to starting there again. Alternatively you could try applying through the official channels, but I'm not sure ...


2

Don't be the reading police. I'm going to cut your question: How do you deal with co-workers who respond to your emails without reading the whole thing, or don't read them at all? Down to the only part you should actively engage on: How do you deal with co-workers? Whether they have or have not read an email is irrelevant. Treating them based on the ...


1

This sounds like project management being done via email which is not a good idea for the reasons you listed. You should say something simple like "we are on schedule", "behind schedule by X days" something short and to the point. Then you can say "for more details see the project here" then give them some way of seeing the ...


3

Well, let's look at what you saw outside the company. Awards- who awarded them? For what? What was the process? Frequently, these awards are bought and paid for. Even when not, they're frequently gamed- some companies will make a push to get people to vote for them if its a web survey. Some won't. Some may even outright buy votes. Awards are worth ...


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