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3

Management and the Pack seem to be encouraging and reenacting roles on the Drama Triangle (Persecutor, Victim, Rescuer) where so far you play Rescuer of Victims. Most likely management and the Pack will not easily transcend these patterns. The culture is attracting people who are attracted to drama. People who do not fit in that culture exit via higher than ...


0

One VERY effective attack in bullying is to create a conditioned response in the victim. If they can set you off by giving you a look, you've already lost, and it's time to update your resume and get out ASAP. If you want to fight them, you need to leave your paranoia at the door, and show them you are completely immune to their tactics. If they give you a ...


1

You're expendable. You're basically the defense attorney in a kangaroo court system. Literally anybody could play the role of that attorney and get the exact same results that you've achieved. You say you don't like drama but the only outcome of confronting them will be more drama. Time to get another job.


12

Calmly ignore it. Be a boring victim who doesn't get it. Bullying is only fun when the victim gives a reaction. If you run to HR - they got a reaction so they think they win. If you quit - they got a reaction so they think they win. If you take sick / vacation leave - they got a reaction so they think they win. If you run to your boss - they got a reaction ...


16

So is a dirty look enough of an issue to risk poking the bear? It wouldn't be for me. And if The Pack group is as evil, powerful, and as management-supported as you express, you'd be doomed anyway. Apparently, you've put up with this for years, but I wouldn't want to work in that sort of company. And I would see no benefit to confronting this "key ...


3

Given that you've been there long enough to know how this will play out (management will do nothing, you'll likely end up leaving the roll), you have nothing to lose by politely, coolly, unemotionally, but directly standing up for yourself. Next time you receive the "purest look of loathing" when you walk by that person's desk, stop, look directly ...


0

In this case your location is a paramount, in countries like USA all this is a perfect ground for hostile workplace claim. But, regardless of the location, i can suggest you to look for a new position as soon as possible. This type of mental stress at work considerably changes people and takes toll on personal life as well. Read these when you get the chance ...


2

In some countries in the EU the land title register (I hope I use the right term here) is open to the public. In many of those countries, mortage notes will be noted in this register. So if your company has the morgages on it's buildings (if any) at the same bank it does do most of it's business with, you might find it there. Otherwise (as far as I know) ...


0

TL;DR Why would the intermediaries you're targeting show any more "willingness to listen and agree" than your target companies? They have nothing to gain from going along with this. Think about it from their perspective: would you recommend someone who you didn't even know to one of your customers? To put it bluntly, why should they care whether ...


5

How could I find the target public company's largest customers so I could contact them and ask them if they could contact the target company? So you're looking to leverage a pre-existing relationship between your "Target" company and one of their large customers to get yourself a deal with the Target. Which is not, in of itself completely ...


2

What you ask is against all logic. You want a company "Cabc" to reveal its biggest customers, so you can contact the customers, completely bypassing "Cabc" ... The list of customers is, quite often, a very important trade secret. Disclosing such information without permission is most likely illegal. Therefore, no sane individual (lawyer ...


6

Just some quick advice: In a physical office, lots of interpersonal communication just 'happens'. People go grab a coffee, and stop over at the new guy's desk on the way back to say hello and introduce themselves. Conversations happen with people in your vicinity that you might be included in automatically or you can easily join. People might invite you out ...


2

Most of your perceived issues don't exist unless you invent them for yourself. Your main problem will be staying motivated and working. It's extremely easy when working remotely to slack off and procrastinate. And the company will be looking for people doing that. The company will have professionals outlining procedures and keeping everyone in touch. Follow ...


0

Set up yourself a dedicated place in your home where you work. I find this helps manage the work/home aspect of things and stick to it. Otherwise integrating in an organisation is quite variable as there may or may not be a compagny identity. If there are unofficials ways to communicate with outers in more 'private' groups or such things it might be a good ...


0

It's devastating seeing that I've spent two weeks doing a refactor to later see that a coworker completely broke the new abstraction I've added copying and pasting code instead of using it. I could expect this from junior developers, but they aren't. I don't think your co-workers are purposely broke the abstraction rules. They probably didn't know any ...


1

You could attempt to placate this issue by suggesting simple and quick ways to improve code quality. This will depend on what languages and IDEs you're working with, but consider using code quality tools such as SonarLint https://plugins.jetbrains.com/plugin/7973-sonarlint . These are (usually) free, easy to install, and allow you to improve code quality ...


1

This is one of those things that needs to be escalated to management, and shop standards need to be outlined and then implemented. In my case, I was the lead, so I could enforce the standards personally. If you want to do that, you are going to need buy-in from management. Badly written code may run well during sunny day conditions, but when something blows ...


4

I've dealt with this in the past, "senior" developers who write code which works (barely) but is sloppy, has lots of design errors, is untestable, etc. Here's what I did: Deny all PRs sent to you. Firstly, write comments in each PR telling them what to fix (yes, I know, it's exhausting). Then if they refuse to fix them, click the "close PR&...


0

they write code that just works Well, at least the code works. Nice code which didn't work would be worse, right? Firstly, you should be grateful you are working at a place which produces working software, because believe me, I've worked in places where most software releases are late, missing entire features, and buggy as hell. I'm not saying that nice ...


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