New answers tagged

-2

I am quite appalled with the many discouraging answers that suggest that you should not do this out of some fear of "backfire" or "inappropriateness". People forget that what they fear is what they do not understand, and that seems like kindness. I see this as more of a cultural issue rather than any actual deterministic objective ...


2

We had someone attempt this in a similar vein at a place where I worked (we suspected it was the daughter of the company owner). They sticky-taped images of animals like puppies and geese along with positive feel-good quotes around the office overnight. The overall reaction among the staff the next morning was not good ranging from "Huh" to "...


4

They can certainly arise without a direct reporting relationship. For example, imagine that you have a company with a group of engineers who carry out onsite work, and one of them is married to the person who schedules the onsite jobs. Although the engineer isn't directly reporting to the scheduling/operations person, they could still receive favourable ...


2

An example: my spouse worked with a project manager that didn't always do very good work. The project manager's wife was my spouse's manager. When a project went south (according to my spouse because of the laziness and ineptitude of the project manager), my spouse got a bad annual review. The project manager and manager were not in any direct line of ...


2

I think the answers most people given here is that the workplace may take the notes as something else. And that may be true but I think most people will consider it a bit unorthodox since it is so unusual but I think your personality trait and how you interact with your co/workers will be a top consideration in deciding if this anonymous note idea is a good ...


3

I was curious why you insist on being anonymous and found this comment (which was moved to chat). I’m not sure if it’s a social anxiety thing or if it’s a confidence issue, but if I had it my way, I wouldn’t leave my mark or make myself known to anyone. In fact, I find myself wishing I could exist as a mere speck of light at times. I want to brighten others’...


0

This has potential, but not as you describe it. First off, anonymous praise is only appropriate when you are afraid of retribution if your approval is known. Secondly, a note from a random co-worker saying that their work was appreciated is probably going to be a bit weird -- an email or in person appreciation would be much more typical. Finally, this can be ...


6

I did this once. (I did it anonymously, but everyone knew it was me.) I left a custom handwritten sticky note at everyone's desk (about 20 people). Everyone thoroughly enjoyed it the next morning. Morale was great all day. This was years ago, but someone actually mentioned it just last week. He even recalled what I wrote to him. So it seemed to have a ...


16

Praise your co-workers respectfully; via face-to-face, email, or instant message: Hey Coworker, I just wanted to sincerely thank you for helping me with that report the other day. My boss was really impressed by the work and I mentioned that you gave me some great pointers for creating the report. A generic "I really appreciate all the effort you put ...


30

Being the paranoid person I am, and having worked in more than a few places with HR and managers who would just be so sneaky as to do that, I'd suspect the notes were really telling me that I'm underperforming and should put in more hours and effort because I'm on the shortlist for the next round of layoffs. That's the attitude people in a great many ...


50

While it's quite a nice thought.. I don't think it's a particularly good idea. Anonymous notes - even if the content is ostensibly positive have the potential to backfire in unpredictable and horrible ways. Let's say you leave a note on Janet's desk saying: I hope you have an awesome day today! What you don't realise is that Janet has dealing with a ...


21

Inappropriate? Maybe not. Ineffective? Mostly, yes. There's a general saying: Praise in public, criticize in private. Thank generously, thank often - as you said, even a short note / mention of appreciation can help to motivate people a lot. That said, while I understand your motive is good, making it public will not harm it, rather it'll bring in a ...


146

This seems to address a need you have - and not the recipient. What you consider 'encouragement that can bring a smile to someones face', others could view as patronizing platitudes they find inappropriate in the workplace. People are very different when it comes to the amount and depth of workplace socializing they prefer. Unless you very specifically ...


Top 50 recent answers are included