New answers tagged

1

On my resume I just put the title at my company and write out the description. I find it difficult to believe that a company's verification can't say you worked there because your title mismatched. Usually a company calls a past employer and simply ask if X worked there for Y under the title Z. It sounds like they want you to think twice about leaving ...


5

To add to the excellent answer about documentation: keep some old pay stubs. If company says you didn’t work there, you can show that they are lying. (And maybe you even have the old job title on it.). Also, if you still have it, the transfer/promotion/job offer that has the old title.


1

I think it's fairly important to frame answers to this question in the context of typical advice - because this is a rare situation where typical advice may not make sense (which makes this question not a duplicate of the many well answered questions about how to list job titles on resumes.) Resumes are sales tools. You are selling yourself to potential ...


8

Just a thought, this may not apply in your case, but: In the UK, employment law says you can't make a role redundant and employ someone else in that role for at least 6 months - one way around this that a savvy company may try (and I've worked for such a company previously) is to give each employee a different title - giving the ability to make any one of ...


6

Optimise your resume for the reader. Only put exactly the information they need in there. This obscure job title from your current employer is just noise. It benefits nobody to include it - it only risks misunderstanding. Make things as easy as possible for the hiring manager who will read your resume. They'll have many to read with limited time. Use the ...


13

This must be a joke, if it is, it's pretty funny. Just wait a couple of days If it's really a joke, everyone will know in a couple of workdays. If after a couple of workdays, you still think your boss was serious, then do the following. Document everything Email your HR (or the second in command) to ask if your boss was serious or not. Keep all the ...


165

Put both on your resume so that the reader will have a good idea on what you’re doing AND that your company has an alternative title system. The reader can just then read the description to determine the details of your job e.g. Super Hip Company - Backend Engineer (Internal Title Code: Hadouken) Tuned and optimized SQL Queries to scale product up ...


47

I started out thinking that this was the relevant Dilbert cartoon, but it is more insidious. The company also says that they won't be able to verify employment in references if we list ourselves as our old title and someone calls mentioning that. Their solution to turnover is to try and render you unemployable elsewhere Keep the old title on your ...


57

The company also says that they won't be able to verify employment in references if we list ourselves as our old title and someone calls mentioning that. That seems extremely unlikely. Perhaps a foolish HR Rep might say something like "no, that's not the current title" and tell the potential employer the made-up nonsense title. But I seriously doubt ...


0

"Hey there, you used the word 'usecase' but I'm not familiar with what it means, can you point me in the right direction?" You're in a new environment, so you're going to have to rely on your teammates to help you, and you can do that by clearly and politely asking specific clarifying questions, either in the moment, or later once you've written a few of ...


3

There's an old joke about programming: There are two hard problems in programming: naming things, cache invalidation, and off-by-one errors! Naming things is the hardest problem in programming. Jargon is a required aspect of any technical communication. Don't believe those who claim otherwise. Musk rails against acronyms because they are imprecise jargon, ...


1

In software we have the corresponding terms silent failure and noisy failure. The former happens when a bit of code does not work, but processing continues as if the code had worked properly, and the user is given no indication that things have gone wrong. The latter case is when a failure is brought to the user's attention in some way, either by a warning ...


2

Prepare before the meeting First, some of the words in your example (buy-in and use case) are not actually technical jargon, just standard business lingo, so they're not specific to a company or industry. Unless this is your first job (but you seem to imply it isn't), your first job where you speak in english, or you were restricted to a very limited ...


2

The very simple answer is to take notes during meeting, ask a co-worker later in the day what they mean. Try remember as many as possible, but don't worry about it, you will pick them up pretty quickly. More annoying is when company A uses BOM as 'bill of material' you move to company B where it means 'base order model' urrrghhh One day it will be you ...


0

Something I used in the past when thrown into a meeting outside my expertise: Use google/wiki on your phone to look up the meaning of jargon/acronyms If I can't find them, write them down and after the meeting try to catch a coworker to explain them to you. If possible I would try to catch a meeting participant as that person will already be familiar with ...


4

Multiple people has suggested asking if there's a glossary. There probably isn't if it's that small, but absolutely ask. Then be prepared. If the answer is, "No, we've never needed a glossary. Doesn't everyone know these terms?" offer to start the glossary yourself. Tell your boss, "We're only 30 people now, but we're going to grow, and as we try to ...


0

You could try doing what I do: Learn the jargon, so that you understand it when you hear or see it, then stubbornly refuse to ever use it yourself. Don't lower yourself to their level! Speak properly, using full words - real ones, which can be found in real dictionaries (preferably printed on real paper, not your newfangled e-ink (it's not even ink!)) and ...


-27

Though many answers are rightfully telling you that the use of jargon and acronyms is normal, it should be noted that their use is not universally appreciated. Elon Musk famously dislikes acronyms, and has even instructed employees at SpaceX to use as few acronyms and jargon as possible. Despite the majority of people telling you that you should learn to ...


2

There is plenty of jargon and acronyms not just in workplaces, actually in all organisations for that matter: at work, in university, in your board game club, or surfing tribe. You are frustrated at it, as everybody else would. The only sensible thing you can do is to happily google the industry-wide ones, as you will need them later in your career ...


17

Use this experience to make your company's onboarding better When you hear or see people using acronyms or terms you don't know, write them down. Keep a notebook with you with a page dedicated to this. At your weekly one on one with your supervisor, ask about the new terms you've encountered that week. If you don't have a weekly one on one with your ...


13

You might have a bigger problem than acronyms here. If you think the entire company should stop using technical terms just because you don't understand them, your career in any company is going to be difficult. Of course, this is assuming you get an answer if you ask, and it does seem that you do. If the answer is not satisfactory, keep asking until you ...


1

In the U.K.: 1. Leaving personal information on a computer that isn’t yours is stupid. 2. The company is under no obligation to clean up your computer, and pay the cost of sorting out what is company property and what is your private stuff. 3. The company is not allowed to read your private stuff - except as needed to find out what is owned by the company ...


58

Step #1 Change your frame of mind. "How can I politely ask my coworkers to speak normally?" is quite accusatory and I'm sure no one in the office will enjoy being criticized by the new guy that doesn't understand the acronyms. However, if the entire meeting was held in Klingon and your company is in no way related to the usage nor development of the ...


-4

Go to a lawyer, and get them to draft a cease and desist letter. While the computer and the files stored on it might be company property, your personal bank details wouldn't be, and exposing other employees to them would put you at risk of financial damages that would justify you suing them for recompense. As such, you could go to a lawyer and get them to ...


0

I think you might be overreacting. Unless the new hire has administrative credentials or you were consciously saving your forms or browsing history in places where you shouldn't, the new hire cannot access your stuff. If you still have contact with the hiring manager, by all means let them know, but you may be worrying over nothing.


7

I appreciate the other answers already answer this from an ownership perspective (it was never your computer, you were issued it to perform work activities and they are perfectly within their rights to re-issue the laptop to a new employee (regulations may apply to what must be done first), etc etc), I just wanted to add something technical. The files in ...


11

There is little else to do but have the acronyms explained - either by Googling them later or - if needed - by asking in real-time. As other answers hint, only ask if their use causes outright confusion; interrupting a meeting just because you are curious could be annoying. In addition, I'd actively and visibly write down any answers - as people seem to be ...


42

Jargon is an important communication tool both for speeding up communication and making it more precise. I do not think it would be useful, or even possible, to constrain your colleagues to using only standard English for work discussions. The first thing to do with any unfamiliar term or abbreviation is to feed it to your favorite search engine and ...


226

While "usecase" is a general term, it's normal to take more than one month to learn company specific and industry specific jargon and acronyms. Equally, after just one month, your coworkers should consider it normal for you to still be getting your feet wet and they should be willing to explain acronyms and other concepts specific to the company and ...


0

Is my previous employer allowed to do this? In the USA, the computer and all of the data on it belongs to the company. I'll probably reach out to my previous manager and express my concerns, but if the new hire ends up finding one of the forms that I filled out (that contains banking details or my SSN), am I allowed to make a specific request for ...


13

Is my previous employer allowed to do this? By 'this' I mean copy the image of a previous employee's laptop to be given to another employee. Yes, in the US (and perhaps other locales) they are allowed to do this. I'll probably reach out to my previous manager and express my concerns, but if the new hire ends up finding one of the forms that I ...


0

To me there is some information lacking, to understand what exactly happened here. Some queries I am left with: Why did IT Security call you? They had to find out somehow, but there are several ways to do so, all of which change the context a lot. E.g., possibly security personnel has access to the channel and saw these credentials. Possibly your team ...


3

My thought: the person asking people to type in their password is actually working for the company or passed it on to the security person. My company regularly sends out emails, phone calls, etc to get people to click on links or passwords. Once you do, it's training time. First few times, it's a simple landing page with explanation about clicking links and ...


6

If I understood your question correctly – somebody (not you), was joking around on Slack channel about the fact that they can enter passwords. And then you compromised your password. Now I don’t know any details of how did you threw them under the bus, but as long as you stick to the facts, you did the right thing to report the incident to information ...


2

Considering these types of things eventually happen to people No they don't, it was extremely unprofessional. Especially for engineers. But nothing you can do now but suck it up. You've caused a bit of grief and the sexual harassment thing is probably thrown in as punishment. So don't try and justify it or rationalise it as you did in your question. Learn ...


3

is there anything I can do to prevent these sorts of accidents? Yes, retake the training session, as suggested, and try to stick to the learnings. To add: However tempting it might be to do a silly thing using company resources and to try out new features which can potentially cause an InfoSec breach or a NDA violation, you should not do that. Most of the ...


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