323

People who are content with their job aren't going to ask you for a promotion - it might come up in their performance review, and they won't turn it down, but if they're happy where they are they're already happy. Generally you have four types of people who will come to you and actively ask for a promotion/raise: People who are looking to rise through the ...


315

Slovakia is an EU member since 2004. What your boss wants to do is illegal anywhere in the EU. We can ignore all your arguments why it took longer, fact is you were employed for three weeks, therefore he must pay for three weeks. That's all that counts legally: you were employed, therefore he must pay. So tell him this, don't enter any discussions, and if ...


270

Don't approach the boss, approach your colleague himself. You should tell him something along the lines of, "You know that if the competitor pays X you could probably ask for a similar/higher figure. I think you should talk to the boss about this". Salary is a supply/demand thing; your boss wants to pay as little as possible, but will be ready to pay as ...


188

You're missing the obvious third option: Stop working on Saturdays It's clear you're not allowed to work on Saturdays so you should stop doing it. If your manager tries to force you anyway you kindly respond with: Of course I would work on Saturday if you need me to, as long as I can officially enter those hours in my time-sheet and receive the proper ...


161

What could happen from here, if I tell them would they ask me to pay back the money that's in it? Or if I don't am I at risk? In every locale I'm aware of you will be required to pay back the funds. Make sure to save enough so that you can cover the costs when you are inevitably caught. If you put it in the bank, you might earn a euro or two in interest, ...


135

I'm going to join the other answers that are frame-challenging your question. Instead of trying to find a way to win at negotiating an offer you don't intend to accept, you should just not negotiate for positions you don't intend to accept. If you don't intend to honestly consider taking a position, you should not pursue it. As an employer and a hiring ...


132

In short, no, you should not remove an account number or refuse pay. You must be doing something right, because if you were really doing a bad job, you would be fired. It is understandable to feel like you aren't doing any good work or you are burned out, but the ultimate decision on how you are performing comes down to the company. If you really need ...


129

If you want to get paid what you're worth you're probably going to have to change jobs. There's a 99% chance that management is lying when they say "they can't figure out how to do it"; with a 1% chance of general incompetence instead. Either way you're not getting it from your current employer. Very large raises, and the equivalent to 7-12 years ...


128

If you are willing to take a pay cut, your current salary isn't really relevant. What they want to know is what your target range is. Try something like I'm currently compensated significantly over the market rate since my current role has some particularly difficult aspects to it. I have no expectation that this new role would match my current salary ...


113

Although it has since been edited out of the question, you originally asked: Is this practice unethical? It doesn't fit with my ethics, or the ethics of any company I have ever worked for. is there another reason a company would reduce the salary after making the initial offer? I've heard of companies rescinding offers completely when financing goes ...


109

If the company can't spend $2000 for a computer that they agree is the right tool for your job, what makes you think they'll be willing to compensate you for using your own computer to do that same job? I suggest that you not use your personal computer for this. It's the company's responsibility to provide the tools for you to effectively perform your job. ...


106

You should absolutely leave. I wouldn't recommend signing anything that has language in it putting responsibilities past the next few months if you don't feel you want to be around past then. First and foremost... Stop giving overtime for free. This is in everybody's best interest. They have a legal obligation to pay you and you are just creating a liability ...


99

It is a sad but true thing that the longer you work for a company, the farther you get from what the market is paying. Market rates are generally only paid to new hires. Annual pay raises rarely keep up. If you want to keep your salary at market rates, you have to either move on every two years or so or negotiate for yourself. It is your coworker's choice ...


97

As anybody else would do, I am applying for job interviews to find another job, but I realized that my income is way higher than average (+25-30%). Usually 10-15 seconds of silence follow after I say my income. If your mention of your salary is only followed by silence, then you must immediately add more to your statement. Something along the lines ...


95

This is not a commute, this is a necessary job function required by the client in order to perform the work. Would you be paid for your travel if you were required to show up on the job site once a week? Probably not. I wouldn't see as harmful to ask for the equipment to be shipped to you, but this is not a good hill to die on.


83

Short Answer: If you have budget and requirement for an internship, then that is on offer. This person can choose to take that or not. If the role you have available is for an intern, then that is what you are offering. The person is applying for an internship as this is a requirement for their course. In the end, you have a role you are offering, and ...


76

Screw the candy bars. Send her an apology, figure out exactly what happened and make damn sure that you have your transfer procedures down pat going forward. They might not be so tolerant the next time you do it. No need to compensate. Somebody is going to do it to you, and you should be just as gracious about it as she was. Over a period of years if not ...


69

You're eligible for a bonus, if you and/or the company/department you work for meet some criteria. If that happens, it will be at least xyz. Except depending on the exact wording of the bonus policy it may even come in under that. What's this worth? $0. There's a billion ways for the company to game it, in one company I worked at it was a joke where the ...


69

I've seen a similar thing done with platforms like Bonusly, where staff get to "give" a certain amount of money out of a pool to each other to reward their colleagues. There are several problems with this kind of system (and with your suggestion): It can reward people who are popular, rather than who are good. It can reward people who staff think ...


67

You've been had. You've been working in a highly qualified position for less than minimum wage. Cut your losses and find a decent job that pays a decent wage. If you ever consider working for a startup, you may accept a slightly below market salary for immediate equity. But not below minimum wage with no guarantees whatsoever.


61

Is this a reflection on my value... No ... or is there another reason a company would reduce the salary after making the initial offer? I can think of a couple of potential reasons: They lost an account they were depending on to fund your salary. They are having financial difficulties and are cutting everyone's salary by 10%. There was a ...


60

It means that you will get shares in the company as part of your contract, either standard, or as part of your bonus. It usually happens with startups (also bigger US companies). These are taxed lower since you bear the risk of getting less money should the company go belly-up.


55

If you get treated like a contractor, behave like one. You name the terms that are acceptable to you, and otherwise you don't sign. If you don't want to sign for a long period, but only a short period, you say exactly that. If they want to pay you a very low X, you treat that as a negotiation tactic. Tell them all the risks you have to take, and name your ...


52

Do not state what you earn during interviews. Doing so gives no benefit to you and places you in a weaker bargaining position. Plus it may incur a jealousy factor from the people interviewing you, where they may explicitly sabotage you to fail. If the question is pressed during the interview, one approach would be to redirect the question with what is your ...


52

Your compensation versus market rate The key conclusion from your observation "about 2 months after someone asks for a promotion or raise and does not get it, they are out the door." is that apparently the same people could get that promotion or raise in other companies; that you're seeing in practice that in general, "the market" is ...


48

You should be aware that a very specific set of behaviors are legally protected by the NLRB, even if you are not in a union. Discussing pay is protected, especially if it is a part of collective bargaining. In short, you are legally protected from retaliation from discussing YOUR salary. You can, while on your break or in a non-work area, tell others "I ...


44

As you mention it, it sounds like your manager is stopping you from making fair usage of the company policy. It's bad. Reach out to the HR, immediately. This is a malpractice that needs to stop. Simply put, your manager is asking you to work for free to show up the profit in the balance sheet. That's unfair and not correct. As you mentioned, your manager ...


43

In most places, it would be absolutely fine to spend the money that was put on the card while you were employed. I'm sure the tax office has been informed of that money and you paid income tax on it. So the "I'll keep spending until the card is empty" isn't wrong. If it was slightly different: The company gave you a gift card with 140€ every month to pay for ...


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