95

This is not a commute, this is a necessary job function required by the client in order to perform the work. Would you be paid for your travel if you were required to show up on the job site once a week? Probably not. I wouldn't see as harmful to ask for the equipment to be shipped to you, but this is not a good hill to die on.


19

This is not unpaid labor. Most work-from-home positions have some sort of requirement to report to an office on occasion. This is commuting for that purpose. If you don't want to make the drive, you can asked if it can be shipped to you, but you should be prepared to handle that expense.


19

To give a different perspective (which isn't legally relevant since this is in the US): In the European Union these things are covered by the Working Time Directive which is quite clear on these matters. Commuting time to your fixed place of work is not paid. If you're going to a client or some other work place this is considered part of your work hours and ...


9

Your contract with the staffing agency should make these things clear. As the agency have said, this is basically a commute. I see the other answers tend to agree with them. So, read your contract. I expect it to say something like "travel to and from the work site is the responsibility of the employee". Other than that, you have to decide ...


8

It depends on the circumstances. Let's say in normal times you wouldn't be working from home, you would have commuted to the clients' office every day at your own expense. In that case, just pick up things. You save money every other day by not commuting. The "picking up equipment" (that is carrying it from the client's office to your car) is work ...


4

Consider that this gives you an opportunity to meet in person some of the people you're going to be working with or reporting to. Visiting in person, making a good impression, and learning a bit more directly than you could do remotely is of value to you, and not to the staffing agency. I'd make this a day-long excursion, which by definition would be paid ...


2

I like to die on small hills, but I would not start a relationship by being exploited. "The way we think of it is one would not normally charge their employer for the time it takes to get to and from work... We ask that you only bill for time worked." They are correct that you should not bill for time it takes to get to and from work. But unless ...


2

I'll first say that if you were unionized (i.e. employees of either the agency's client, direct and indirect; or employees of the staffing agencies), you would have been in a much better position to secure the right of travel reimbursement. That aside - the question of whether you should push back is to some extent a labor-legal question. I don't live in ...


1

At the end of the day it may be better to let it go and just swallow the cost. It may not be worth ruffeling feathers this early into a (employment) relationship. That aside I think it would be fare to be paid for your return journey. You normally do not get paid for a commute from your home to your normal place of business. However your normal place of ...


1

There are two things that I haven’t seen addressed in any of the other answers. One, the client may be unaware of the staffing agency’s action. It’s possible that while their contract doesn’t require them to pay, that they would be either willing to pay if informed or would reach out and encourage the staffing agency to do so. You could also suggest that ...


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