171

You're missing the obvious third option: Stop working on Saturdays It's clear you're not allowed to work on Saturdays so you should stop doing it. If your manager tries to force you anyway you kindly respond with: Of course I would work on Saturday if you need me to, as long as I can officially enter those hours in my time-sheet and receive the proper ...


134

I'm going to join the other answers that are frame-challenging your question. Instead of trying to find a way to win at negotiating an offer you don't intend to accept, you should just not negotiate for positions you don't intend to accept. If you don't intend to honestly consider taking a position, you should not pursue it. As an employer and a hiring ...


129

If you are willing to take a pay cut, your current salary isn't really relevant. What they want to know is what your target range is. Try something like I'm currently compensated significantly over the market rate since my current role has some particularly difficult aspects to it. I have no expectation that this new role would match my current salary ...


98

As anybody else would do, I am applying for job interviews to find another job, but I realized that my income is way higher than average (+25-30%). Usually 10-15 seconds of silence follow after I say my income. If your mention of your salary is only followed by silence, then you must immediately add more to your statement. Something along the lines ...


82

Short Answer: If you have budget and requirement for an internship, then that is on offer. This person can choose to take that or not. If the role you have available is for an intern, then that is what you are offering. The person is applying for an internship as this is a requirement for their course. In the end, you have a role you are offering, and ...


51

Do not state what you earn during interviews. Doing so gives no benefit to you and places you in a weaker bargaining position. Plus it may incur a jealousy factor from the people interviewing you, where they may explicitly sabotage you to fail. If the question is pressed during the interview, one approach would be to redirect the question with what is your ...


43

As you mention it, it sounds like your manager is stopping you from making fair usage of the company policy. It's bad. Reach out to the HR, immediately. This is a malpractice that needs to stop. Simply put, your manager is asking you to work for free to show up the profit in the balance sheet. That's unfair and not correct. As you mentioned, your manager ...


42

Startups offer equity because they acknowledge the risk to the employees of the company failing, so they present an 'upside' - if the company does well, everyone benefits. It takes a certain type of person to be attracted by that offer. Other people, like yourself, do the math; the company is unlikely to be that unicorn. What do you do? You reject their ...


40

How should I proceed? Politely decline their offer and continue to search for a new company to work for. If the reason for requiring you to switch banks is true, this is indicative of a whole department (arguably the most important for any employee) that doesn't seem to know what they're doing. Definitely not a company worth working for.


29

Interestingly no one has mentioned yet.... Apply for a better job. There are higher paying jobs out there that you could (and likely should) apply for. The pause in the interview is likely caused by the person interviewing you not getting paid as much as you are. The other answers are no less valid. Asking for a lower salary is an option. But from what ...


28

I think the simple answer is: Always ask for a salary where you would at least seriously consider taking the job if they are willing to give it to you. You can tell them directly that you are happy with your current job and would only consider switching if this comes with a serious salary increase. The information that someone would be willing to hire you ...


25

Most likely a scam, especially if the company is online based. I'd review up to this point how you got the job. Did you go for an interview? Were you hired on the spot? Were all your paperwork done via email/telephone? This scam is common. A fake company has you do what seems like work, then they "pay" you with a check with very specific instructions like ...


22

An internship is not the same as a full-time position with less pay. An intern: little to no responsibility beyond doing the tasks given to them learns on the job is limited form a few month to a year A full-term employee: takes ownership of their work from beginning to end after on-boarding is done doesn't need to relearn their core function stays with ...


19

It's really impossible to answer your question without more details. The pay you can offer them should reflect: how much he is worth to you. Is he worth to you more than "normal" interns are? Would you be able to make use of his more developed skills? your budgetary constraints. Can you afford to have a new employee?


19

I had a similar experience to yours (moving from capitol to much smaller city). Don't say how much you earn. Ask them how much they can offer. Then you can decide if their offer is good for you. And, IMHO, it won't make them think you will be leaving them soon for a company that could match your previous salary. Just by telling how much you expect to ...


18

There's no need to overcomplicate this. Just tell them that your fee to work on this project is $X. If they find that number too high, they are free to look elsewhere. There's no reason for you to undervalue your time to work on this project. You could lower your $X somewhat if you feel that you will gain a great deal (personally/professionally) from ...


18

I'd tell them: "That's OK, assuming that it's indeed sometimes and not most of the time, and that the company is also OK with me sometimes having to come late or leave early, on both sides within reasonable limits". These are the points I'm trying to illustrate: Any company can sometimes find itself in a situation where some overtime is needed; but if that ...


17

Should I ask for an extra raise? Yes, definitely ask. However, if I were you I would not worry about past raises. I would focus on what you are currently worth, and in particular what are you currently worth to the company? There are many sites you can use to get the average going rate for your skill set and experience. Come to the discussions about ...


16

Your post is asking a few different questions, so I'll tackle each one separately: How to negotiate an offer if I'm not actually going to accept it? Don't negotiate any offer you're not wanting to accept. Be respectful of people's time and efforts. If an employer really wants you and is willing to go to higher management to negotiate a higher salary or ...


15

As someone who has done this successfully in the past, what worked for me was being honest from the get-go, both with the recruiter and with the company, and tell them about my current situation. Something like this is what I would pitch: Thanks for getting in touch with me. The project sounds very interesting, and I would definitely like to learn more ...


11

There are many reasons for this. One is that yes, it is in their contract. If I'm making a million a year somewhere and you ask me to give that up and come and work for you, and then it doesn't work out and I can't get things accomplished with the team and resources provided, so I have to leave, then I will get X as compensation for wasting my time and ...


10

You could threaten to quit. But then you wouldn't get class credit. The company knows this, so there isn't likely anything you can do. Honestly? It's how the game is played. Be happy to get ANY pay for an internship--many internships are done for no pay. Just deal with it and get your class credit, then move on. If you really are doing a ...


10

Your contract defines bonus structure. You should consult your signed contract, and ask for clarification. Email something like this before meeting with your manager: Hey, I see. Of course, there is no problem, but could you please help me navigate the contract to see where is bonus structure is outlined? I just wanna be sure. On this website there is a ...


10

I disagree with the other answer encouraging to ask for extra raise. is it normal that I ask for a "double" raise? No, it is not. Initially, you were supposed to have your employment and salary reviewed and revised after 7th, 14th and 22nd month, and if things work out, indefinite contract thereafter. So, there was a risk (however small that is) of you ...


10

They are promising orally that offer letter would be sent in a month I can promise you over the phone that you will get rich, famous and own your own set of Yachts. (And there are business models build on doing just that for money). But should you believe that and resign because of that? Probably not. I'm sure they only accept written statements (or would ...


10

The first part of the answer to your question is that the portfolio risk working for a startup is nil -- you've paid nothing, you have nothing to lose. If your concern is that the downside risk to your portfolio will cause it to underperform, the question is "How?" Again, you paid nothing, and the only risk is not being compensated what you believe you are ...


9

To give you the straight dope: You have no rights. It's a case of bad luck. You could ask, obviously, but it is entirely at the discretion of the boss to make that decision, you literally have no real argument other than "but I really want to make more money". Can't really put it any nicer than that. Good luck.


8

The real answer is, there is no answer. Every company struggles with fair ways to grade employees, and the process behind it. There are numerous schools of though, and have been many many attempts over the years by many organisations to find an ideal process. As you were coming up with a grading system, you should have considered how the system should work....


8

Go up the ladder. Have you talked to the head of HR? Or the senior leadership that HR reports to? That would be my next step. It's not out of line to contact the owner if it's a small company and he's accessible. I'd pursue every avenue I could before the legal route.


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