133

I'm going to join the other answers that are frame-challenging your question. Instead of trying to find a way to win at negotiating an offer you don't intend to accept, you should just not negotiate for positions you don't intend to accept. If you don't intend to honestly consider taking a position, you should not pursue it. As an employer and a hiring ...


129

If you are willing to take a pay cut, your current salary isn't really relevant. What they want to know is what your target range is. Try something like I'm currently compensated significantly over the market rate since my current role has some particularly difficult aspects to it. I have no expectation that this new role would match my current salary ...


98

As anybody else would do, I am applying for job interviews to find another job, but I realized that my income is way higher than average (+25-30%). Usually 10-15 seconds of silence follow after I say my income. If your mention of your salary is only followed by silence, then you must immediately add more to your statement. Something along the lines ...


51

Do not state what you earn during interviews. Doing so gives no benefit to you and places you in a weaker bargaining position. Plus it may incur a jealousy factor from the people interviewing you, where they may explicitly sabotage you to fail. If the question is pressed during the interview, one approach would be to redirect the question with what is your ...


42

Startups offer equity because they acknowledge the risk to the employees of the company failing, so they present an 'upside' - if the company does well, everyone benefits. It takes a certain type of person to be attracted by that offer. Other people, like yourself, do the math; the company is unlikely to be that unicorn. What do you do? You reject their ...


40

How should I proceed? Politely decline their offer and continue to search for a new company to work for. If the reason for requiring you to switch banks is true, this is indicative of a whole department (arguably the most important for any employee) that doesn't seem to know what they're doing. Definitely not a company worth working for.


29

Interestingly no one has mentioned yet.... Apply for a better job. There are higher paying jobs out there that you could (and likely should) apply for. The pause in the interview is likely caused by the person interviewing you not getting paid as much as you are. The other answers are no less valid. Asking for a lower salary is an option. But from what ...


28

I think the simple answer is: Always ask for a salary where you would at least seriously consider taking the job if they are willing to give it to you. You can tell them directly that you are happy with your current job and would only consider switching if this comes with a serious salary increase. The information that someone would be willing to hire you ...


25

Most likely a scam, especially if the company is online based. I'd review up to this point how you got the job. Did you go for an interview? Were you hired on the spot? Were all your paperwork done via email/telephone? This scam is common. A fake company has you do what seems like work, then they "pay" you with a check with very specific instructions like ...


19

I had a similar experience to yours (moving from capitol to much smaller city). Don't say how much you earn. Ask them how much they can offer. Then you can decide if their offer is good for you. And, IMHO, it won't make them think you will be leaving them soon for a company that could match your previous salary. Just by telling how much you expect to ...


19

I'd tell them: "That's OK, assuming that it's indeed sometimes and not most of the time, and that the company is also OK with me sometimes having to come late or leave early, on both sides within reasonable limits". These are the points I'm trying to illustrate: Any company can sometimes find itself in a situation where some overtime is needed; but if that ...


18

Companies have lousy internal pricing systems that make turnover seem a lot cheaper than it is. TL;DR: Raises are very obvious in terms of higher costs. Changes in productivity can often be completely missed or just assigned no value at all. The 5-year tenured engineer has deep knowledge of the internal systems and practices and is more capable of ...


16

As someone who has done this successfully in the past, what worked for me was being honest from the get-go, both with the recruiter and with the company, and tell them about my current situation. Something like this is what I would pitch: Thanks for getting in touch with me. The project sounds very interesting, and I would definitely like to learn more ...


15

Your post is asking a few different questions, so I'll tackle each one separately: How to negotiate an offer if I'm not actually going to accept it? Don't negotiate any offer you're not wanting to accept. Be respectful of people's time and efforts. If an employer really wants you and is willing to go to higher management to negotiate a higher salary or ...


15

It's not unfair to ask, but I don't think you'll get very far. Free lunches are a perk, which are loosely defined as "nice-to-have" things that a company provides. These are distinct from benefits, which are forms non-wage compensation like paid time off or health insurance. A company is not required to continue to provide perks, and it might seem petty to ...


12

Companies often have you pay and then reimburse you to minimize this behavior. Interview practice is always good. Just go, use the interview as free practice, and then enjoy your time in the city complication free. If they offer you the job, just decline. This strategy would almost assuredly avoid legal problems.


11

There are many reasons for this. One is that yes, it is in their contract. If I'm making a million a year somewhere and you ask me to give that up and come and work for you, and then it doesn't work out and I can't get things accomplished with the team and resources provided, so I have to leave, then I will get X as compensation for wasting my time and ...


11

You weren't exactly promised. Get that thought out of your head. Because it sounds entitled, and entitlement will not win you the race. Instead, treat it as a typical race for a contested promotion: You told us what Alessandro does better. What do you do better? Social skills is vague. Put this into concret examples that you can show Ted. Preferably ...


10

They are promising orally that offer letter would be sent in a month I can promise you over the phone that you will get rich, famous and own your own set of Yachts. (And there are business models build on doing just that for money). But should you believe that and resign because of that? Probably not. I'm sure they only accept written statements (or would ...


10

The first part of the answer to your question is that the portfolio risk working for a startup is nil -- you've paid nothing, you have nothing to lose. If your concern is that the downside risk to your portfolio will cause it to underperform, the question is "How?" Again, you paid nothing, and the only risk is not being compensated what you believe you are ...


10

Someone's trying to pull something in the head office. That means that they're presenting it to you as inescapable, and expecting you to just buy into it. Unfortunately, you don't have optics on the situation. It might be that they have more than enough ruthlessness and pull to get what they want, or it may be that they're bluffing. One important thing ...


9

There might be nuances using which you can figure out something to avoid the legalities for avoiding the interview and use that company-provided fund to have a personal tour, but being very straightforward, I'd suggest : Don't do this. Since you already mentioned: Since they won't stop harassing me no matter how many times I tell them to screw off ...


9

The only two options I can see are: 1) Work to rule - do my current job and refuse to do anything not covered by the job role 2) Accept that my work load has doubled without remuneration You have a third option. Take the new position, and the smaller pay rise, and update your resume with the new position. Then look for another company to move to, and ...


8

Rather than the pay on hire being arbitrary, it sounds like your new coworker did a better job negotiating with the company while being hired. There isn't much you can do without rocking the boat, and "S/He gets paid more" is never a valid reason for a pay raise. The best you can do short of finding another company to work for and trying to negotiate a ...


8

I can't comment about the Netherlands specifically, but where I am cost to get to and from work is your own problem. BUT If the employer is subsidizing some people's travel but not others then that seems unfair. I wouldn't expect the employer to cover your whole trip, but you should at least get the same fixed rate as everyone else to cover at least the ...


8

I would strongly recommend against doing this. I understand why. You're wanting some leverage against your current employer to negotiate a raise. But I'll raise some concerns with your approach. If your skills, experience and work performance are high then those things should be sufficient to negotiate a pay increase. Would your current employer ...


8

I fully agree with the answer given by Kilisi. However, I'd like to extend that by adding another point of view. Once my coworker departs (after the notice period), I would like to negotiate a raise. This will also coincide with my year-end review in mid-December. You have an added advantage, as the natural performance review cycle is around the corner. ...


8

You seem too emotionally involved. Frankly, I think that continuing to lingering in this hate and vendetta fantasies for the company is not healthy for you; I perfectly get that unfair treatment and being fired is terrible, but you have to move on, emotionally and professionally. Yes, you could play some tricks on them, but you have a commitment as a ...


8

Why do companies give higher raises to engineers that switch instead of engineers that stay? I'm going to quote a part of your post to make my point: Culture was great, I was just beginning to be very productive due to my knowledge accrual, I had developed great relationships with my colleagues. But I just could not turn down the 25% salary increase a ...


7

Your title is not the most relevant thing in your LinkedIn / resumé as this can vary GREATLY in the market, even between big companies - and the tiles can also be very vague and generic, e.g. Operations Manager can mean VERY different things between companies. The most important thing for the recruiters to have some idea of what you can actually do is to ...


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