New answers tagged

3

What does the Handbook say about PTO usage (not salary/pay reduction)? Seems as though some of the responses are confusing deducting PTO with reducing salary. If you're exempt, as long as they're not reducing your pay, they can use/deduct your PTO hours.


5

WARNING: Based on Sleske comment, I jumped to a conclusion that I most likely shouldn't have in my original answer, so I've modified my answer to take into account the new information he provided. From your own employee handbook, it says: that salary employee pay will not be reduced for "partial day absences for personal reasons, sickness, or ...


0

Why would you escalate the situation? IMHO, notify your direct manager and use your vacation time until the end of the 2019 This way, entire issue is moot. This will also allow your manager to reach out to you with plan for vacation usage in other ways, and you will have a paper trail for your options


4

You are in a sticky situation. IF your employer transitioned your place of employment, which they should have, then you are now governed under those states laws. However, if the company has most of their people in CA their 'policy' may be to pay out vacation now matter where you live. Remote workers provide interesting problems for companies, especially ...


8

I fully agree with the answer given by Kilisi. However, I'd like to extend that by adding another point of view. Once my coworker departs (after the notice period), I would like to negotiate a raise. This will also coincide with my year-end review in mid-December. You have an added advantage, as the natural performance review cycle is around the corner. ...


3

With that in mind, how can I leverage my coworker's departure into a raise? By outlining your increased responsibilities. Basically you don't have to do much except give the amount you feel you need to stay working there plus a bit extra so you have room if needed. The less rationalisation you need to do at that point the better. But have your arguments ...


0

Will it be ethical to ask for that leave to be covered or remunerated instead or would that be asking too much? It is absolutely ethical and not too much to ask. Before you do that, however, check your employment contract, employee handbook, etc. In the United States, at least, only a few states require payout of unused leave. Most states leave it up to ...


4

Pending leave means you have not yet taken it, so you will still have that leave accrued. In many jurisdictions, accrued leave that has not been taken before resigning or being released is typically factored into your final pay - you don't generally have to ask for it. You should check your employment agreement, if you have any such thing. You should also ...


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