New answers tagged

-2

As others already stated you might need to leave for a huge increase. One can expect about 30% more when switching jobs (after about 5 years of staying at a company). But there is another way if you want to stay: You could negotiate that they pay the salary that you want in the future, if a 60% increase is not possible immedately. Get a contract that ...


1

Now back to my question(s), what should I do to give myself the best chance of negotiating a significant salary increase? Get another job that pays what you expect and see if your current employer will match it. Be prepared to leave. If you feel you're significantly underpaid, start job searching. Finding out what people will pay you is the best and most ...


8

You should come up with a number that would cause you to stay, and tell your boss that you expect this number as part of your upcoming promotion. Do it now, as this sort of very large increase will cost your boss a lot of political capital, and likely take a lot of work to get through. Meanwhile, update your resume and refresh your professional network. 60% ...


2

This is a terrible idea on many levels. First, it creates resentment and competition between coworkers. Under this system, bonuses are fundamentally a zero-sum game; if I give you $100, there's $100 less for me. This will likely create resentment, manipulation, competition, and possibly even outright sabotage between coworkers, given that other people are ...


5

I'm not an HR person, but I've worked for large companies with complex compensation schemes. What you are talking about is normally just called a bonus. There's a pool of bonus money calculated at the end of a bonus period, and each employee gets a slice of it based on some magic calculation. One place I worked, you were assigned a "target bonus". ...


0

People and managers collectively allocate percent for each member out of a total pool. Pool doesn’t get large, new members reduce everyone’s share. They will make twice a year payments to people who has this right. That means NO measurables to be accounted to. "Vote" can be rigged as every vote can , and IMHO it will be This looks like a great ...


0

I am fairly compensated for the role I was hired for This is your primary concern. The rest isn't your responsibility. If your job description changes then it's time to negotiate. Until then I don't see a problem here.


11

I'm a highly paid, high performing engineer (software rather than hardware, but the example holds true). I have two options for my next job- your company with this pool, or PublicCo which is going to give me RSUs. Why would I ever pick yours? Let's look at the problems: With RSUs, I know about how much they're worth by looking at the ticket price. I ...


8

Possibly ask for a promotion; offer to take over the job of one of the more senior people who left, if you can handle it.


15

Step 1 is ask HR and/or upper management what the plan is to replace your team. Surely somebody knows that it's infeasible to have the same rate of production with 1/4 as many people, so either they're not expecting as much from you (unlikely) or they're actively hiring (more likely). If they are actively hiring, follow up periodically on how the hiring is ...


21

If you're lucky, it will turn into a popularity contest - see the answer by Gh0stFish. If you're unlucky, it will descend into a very nasty power game. Those with the most power and influence get the most money. If I am your supervisor, you'd better vote me a good bonus, or you're getting "requires improvement" on your next appraisal.


69

I've seen a similar thing done with platforms like Bonusly, where staff get to "give" a certain amount of money out of a pool to each other to reward their colleagues. There are several problems with this kind of system (and with your suggestion): It can reward people who are popular, rather than who are good. It can reward people who staff think ...


28

The most important thing about any compensation plan is that people understand how their performance and results impact the rewards. The more direct the connection is the more effective bonus or profit sharing programs are. It's not at all clear from what you've described how an individual's performance translates into money. It sounds more like a ...


8

First of all I have no experience in real-life with this kind of experiment. But I try to feel like someone working under these conditions. new members reduce everyone’s share Would people be happy if someone new is coming? Probably not. New employees would have a bad time. Probably employees would try to play the need of new manpower down until projects ...


1

The below is a layman's understanding, consult a lawyer for an expert opinion. Compensation Under Dutch law, an NDA that limits your current or future ability to find work is not enforceable. You're already compensated through your salary, so an NDA that does not affect your market value does not warrant additional compensation. Standardizing confidentiality ...


1

IANAL and can't cite any specific regulations but the potential issue I see is that if you're billing the customer as a representative of the company and paying the subcontractor out of that amount, then the subcontractor would technically be employed by the company rather than by the customer. It would then follow that any "finder's fee" would ...


8

This is a conflict of interest issue. You now have an incentive to use that sub-contractor even if they are not the best company for the job. Even if you consciously try to be objective and use other companies if they are better, there will probably be some degree of confirmation bias in favor of the sub-contractor. Or you just won’t look very hard for a ...


-1

My first impression (not saying this is what your intent is) is that it almost comes across initially as blackmail. If you spent your life creating something and you required help/ employees, would you be ok with them taking your years worth of creativity elsewhere and replicating what you are doing at the expense of all of your efforts? Usually non ...


11

This should be fine. The danger is if it's construed as a Kickback. But these are done secretly whereas yours is all transparent and agreed to. I don't know your full situation, but, general rule of thumb though is not to mention subcontractors at all. There is always a danger of them being head hunted or other issues.


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