82

I don't think the employee did anything wrong beyond forgetting to ask for hard copies. In addition, this client seems like they were already primed to leave. Your employee made one clear mistake (although not a major one) in not being clear that a hard copy of the information was required. The rest seems perfectly within the range of acceptable behavior. ...


19

These don’t sound like rare situations where an employee should have to rely on feelings and intuition to decide what to do. If you don’t have documented procedures for what to do if a client brings in screenshots on a digital device or asks to close their account, you have way bigger problems than one employee. I wouldn’t attempt to make any judgement ...


15

How to do code reviews to people whose programming skills are weak? Your task is to review their submitted code, not to evaluate their competency at their programming language. You should treat each review the same regardless of your personal feelings about the programmer. As long as you are consistent with your comments and corrections among all of the ...


11

You weren't exactly promised. Get that thought out of your head. Because it sounds entitled, and entitlement will not win you the race. Instead, treat it as a typical race for a contested promotion: You told us what Alessandro does better. What do you do better? Social skills is vague. Put this into concret examples that you can show Ted. Preferably ...


10

“Incompetent” is a strong word - probably too strong. I think it is fair to say however that the employee is not maximally competent. That is, there are certainly people out there who would have handled the situation better than your employee, though perhaps such people are not easy to find and recruit for the type of position your employee has (or indeed, ...


8

What specific things can I do to get the most value from this employee, recognizing they aren't capable of solving the coding tasks originally intended? IMHO, the degree in the context of this question means very little if they can't do the work. Neither is the lack of coding interview an inherent problem - there's plenty of people that can solve generic ...


7

If you know C++, then you won't have much trouble with C. You are more likely to have trouble with the "low level" stuff. Is there any documentation? Is the code commented? If yes, that helps you. If not, that can be used to mitigate any criticism. Is there anyone, on your new team or elsewhere, who you can talk with about the code structure? The first ...


7

Code reviews are an opportunity for you to provide knowledge and insight on the work that your colleagues have done. This is also an opportunity for you to learn from them. Looking at a review like that, there are three areas that I look for. Linting/Style issues - If you have a style guide in the company, it should be accessible and ideally enforced ...


7

It's kind of disturbing that much of these answers are trying to interpret a serious pedagogy problem as a technical issue about linting. If the submitters are scraping together code that barely even works, putting that through a code review is only slightly better for them then reading compiler error messages. You should see this as a coaching role and ...


6

Congratulations on your promotion. Now that you are promoted to a new role, there are new responsibilities which comes with that role, and that is the code review. From your description, it seems either The organization / team does not have a coding guidelines and best practices rule-book. The team does not pay any heed to the existing guidelines. Either ...


6

I think the question is less about the employee, and more about identifying your own part in this: Have you offered the right training to your employees? Have you shared with your employees the right way to escalate something? Do your employees know your expectation when it comes to saving a client? If the computers don't allow outside internet access, but ...


5

I'd like to add something. You say: I feel I have superior social skills to Alessandro, and can work much better with people in a "team lead" capacity: is there any way to convey this to Ted? And then you also say: I'm wondering if this could be brought up with an external agency, such as the #MeToo movement, but am worried that it could become ...


4

What specific things can I do to get the most value from this employee, recognizing they aren't capable of solving the coding tasks originally intended? Specifically, you can provide training. While the employee may not yet be capable of handling the coding tasks, presumably they are capable of learning how to do so. Your job is to help them get there ...


4

My girlfriend manages an unqualified emotional queen's pet project; the kingdom's subjects are all quite unhappy with the high-school mood, should she move on? Yep, she should move on. The behavior of the "queen" is highly unlikely to change. Even if a confrontation happens, and the lady agrees to change her ways, how long before she reverts to her ...


4

Put it exactly the way you did to us, as that was a great review (except maybe for the "use single quotes" bit; that's nitpicking). If the people who cannot program properly accuse you of racism, that's their problem. You're not being racist. You're literally doing your job. They'd need to learn to separate their shortcomings and their potential for ...


4

A couple of points: Your colleagues should not be doing the same mistake more than once. Tell them to use spaced repetition learning with Anki. If they make the same mistake more than once, ask to see their Anki card dealing with the error they just made. At first, their Anki cards probably won't be good enough, but that's ok, focus on how they can improve ...


4

Firstly, "strong candidate" is hardly a promise. It just means that you should apply. I have had various people doing the hiring tell me that I am a strong candidate for a position and then did not even get an interview. I also suspect that your boss doesn't have the authority to make such a promise unless he is one of the chief engineers or other executives....


3

Your interest shouldn't just be in how many skills the fresh grad has; it should be how quickly they pick up new skills. When I was in college, my specialty was VB6 and C++ within Linux. Care to guess how much I did in either of those 5 years afterwards? Or how much I use them now? Likewise, my degree did nothing to help out with soft-skills, nor did it ...


3

There are already very good answers here describing what you can do but I want to add some points to the how, from own experience (not as the lead but as a team member). First, increasing the code quality to a new standard is not a sprint but a marathon. Suddenly setting up 100 linter rules in your CI won't get you to your goal. It will get people mad at ...


3

I, for one, believe it is quite complex, to not say impossible, to make people who know close to no programming to follow coding standards. I'd do the following: 1 - always be friendly in the code review. Never write "you did this wrong". Write "This can be improved by doing X, Y, Z". When they are more experienced you can even rephrase to something along ...


2

If you don’t know whether the employee is incompetent, you are not competent to hire or fire. Your policies are incompetent. The fact that many companies make the same idiotic mistakes doesn’t make them less stupid. You refuse to do business with people who choose not to have a phone or choose not to give you the number. You demand a printout of the tax ...


2

Senior I.T. guy here (20 years experience), I have been both on the "giving" and "receiving" end of code reviews, and what I can say is that language, approach, manners and praise can be very important to the person being reviewed. Imagine you are a junior programmer, with good intentions, trying to code and learn and be better. Reviewer A says: x is wrong,...


2

It is day 1. It is very early to judge. Go get a Udemy course/book on this topic. Tutorials are usually piecemeal. You want a more fundamental understanding. Spend a proportional (I spent several weeks or so when I joined a project where I did not know the stack, but it is also my sole project is ) amount of time on that course/book. Relax. The first day ...


1

It seems you are nowhere near the point where code reviews make sense. I looked at the JavaScript code, and it is godawful. When you write code, you make it work, then you clean it up to the point where you think it's Ok, and then you submit it for a code review. The person who wrote this cannot possibly have thought this code is Ok. Or at least I hope ...


1

Automation Linting and automated checks are beneficial, but you are likely to get push-back from the team, as the checks will slow them down until they learn all the rules. Even so, I would even take it to the next level and make whatever IDE your team uses treat all warnings as errors, so your devs are forced to pay attention to everything the IDE notices....


1

In addition to linters and other mentioned items I'd add. If a new developer, instead of doing straight PR reviews, I'd do pair programming (maybe for a month or 6 weeks) especially if the remainder of the code base is in bad shape or there are not clearly defined standards. I'd this because people react very differently to the process of being criticized (...


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