151

I am a fellow parent and manager. I had to un-stick Lego, wipe little bottoms (off-cam) and stop fights during professional presentations. Or tell my 5 years old to put on some trousers before he comes into the camera. Other answers talk about ignoring it if it doesn't affect work performance. Having to take care of children while trying to work does affect ...


110

Your best bet would be to act as if the child isn't even in the room. If it's not having an impact on either their or your performance it's irrelevant. The professional thing to do would be to continue on about work business. It's a tough time for a lot of people, many I imagine are finding childcare hard to come by. There's a good chance that your ...


80

As the meeting organizer, it would certainly be within your scope to mute the offending party, and you should send them a private message notifying them of that so that they don't attempt to speak and are thus excluded from the meeting. It's not great etiquette, but the meeting must continue without disruption. The technique we use in our company is to pause ...


38

Absolutely appropriate if you are the call organizer to mute someone in this situation. I think it would also be polite to inform them on the call or via chat so that they are aware that they have been muted and perhaps why. In my opinion, the number of people on the call is irrelevant; if noise is disturbing the call then there is nothing wrong with muting ...


29

Note that at least Zoom lets you (as the organizer) select that everyone starts muted by default when they join the meeting. That is in my experience the least controversial approach, because it teaches people that being muted is the norm, not a punishment for background noise. There's no need to interrupt the meeting to call people out and ask them to mute ...


18

As a parent working with no child-care and a lot of meetings, I've needed to navigate this a lot, and I'm not really satisfied with any of the current answers. The problem is that the current answers all make assumptions about what the parent would want. Instead, I recommend a simple, adaptive heuristic: match the parent's level of talking about the child. ...


15

I'd assume that having the child visible in the video / present in the room does not affect the work. If so, then: If you're in the middle of a conversation and your colleague apologizes, don't stop or interrupt, just nod / say "absolutely fine" (or any variant thereof) and carry on with the normal flow. If the other person is apologizing at the ...


13

Should I let my camera on even if the person I am chatting with is not using one? Is it considered rude/unprofessional to turn off the camera? Whether you decide to interview with or without the camera, the decision should be made before the interview. Once you have started the interview, it would be inappropriate to turn off the camera regardless of ...


9

It's not your place to be blunt with him. You've given him some kindly reminders. If he embarrasses himself or your company, it's on him. His superiors should deal with it more directly. If they are unaware of it, you might let them know what's going on so they can be more attentive.


8

Suppose a work culture/environment where, in an in-person meeting, if a presenter does a good job, other attendees express appreciation with applause/clapping. and What is the best way for remote participants to join in a similar expression of appreciation, and is there a good alternative when all participants are remote? As you said, when it is in-...


7

You should be Ok - I will think this is a minor thing and after a minute it will be forgotten about. Anyway - good luck.


6

That depends why they were unmuted. Are they actively participating at the time, or did they just forget to go on mute when they were done speaking? As long as the participant you muted wasn't actively speaking at the time (i.e. they just forgot to mute), I don't think that there's any problem with it. In fact, if I forgot to mute, I'd personally prefer it ...


6

Yes. Speaking as a participant, I think it is useful in your scenario. I once adjusted my webcam in an open discussion forgetting to mute myself and my boss muted me. I found it totally okay and was sorry for not muting myself. I could unmute myself afterward. It is another case when you mute someone, because he should not speak. Then there is a conflict ...


4

I don’t have kids, but I have worked in both Germany and the United States. While the top answers are both right, there are some contextual considerations you might want to make. Relationship to the colleague - if you’re very friendly with each other, it might be weird not to acknowledge the kid, honestly. If you’re more like strangers, then a short ...


3

Boss or non boss, if anything in the call distracts attention while it can be avoided by simply muting the phone, I would state it out loud when the disturbance happens. Turning it jokingly, you could say something like: I'm not sure who we're hearing right now but I would advise to eat some fibers or Wow the noises we're hearing right now leave no ...


3

How do I improve my scribing skills at conferences or meetings? Read the Minutes from other conferences and meetings. See with your own eyes what makes for a good, useful set of Minutes. Copy that style. Practice.


3

The key skill for taking good "executive type" meeting minutes is summarization. You need be able to listen and understand what's being said and to boil it down to the most relevant information pieces / decisions in the conversation. Bullet points are your friends. There are different frameworks you can use for notes, the one I like to use is Context - ...


3

Most people's computers are hooked up to speakers. But this can cause problems when you're doing an interview over the internet: the sound from the speakers can be picked up the microphone, creating either a feedback squeal or an echoing effect as both of your words get played a few times before fading to silence. I can tell you with near certainty that ...


3

Part of the interview process is for people to see each other. The reason for this is so that they can judge how they answer questions, deal with surprises, verify good hygiene, know who they interviewed so they know who to expect on the first day, make sure they dressed appropriately, and more. With the recruiter having their camera off, they did you a ...


2

Audio only is going to be very difficult, but have you considered designating a mediator? Combined with a chat service where participants can "raise their hand" it could work. It does require some discipline from the participants so that no one interrupts the speaker.


2

Shouldn't you be muted to prevent unpleasant feedback? Every conference call I am on, participants are generally asked to mute themselves to reduce the feedback, static, and background noise. Such an approach essentially precludes applause.


1

You know, and I know, that one second latency (people hear you one second after you speak) will cause problems. Typically when we speak we make small pauses to allow people to interrupt, and if nobody interrupts then we continue to speak. We all do that without thinking about it. This causes problems when in some places people make shorter pauses than in ...


1

Option 1 Reduce latency in your VOIP setup. (by far my most preferred solution) Option 2 Become a tyrannical moderator. Use a written agenda to assign topics and speakers, either on a shared Google Doc or on Asana. Limit each speaker to 2 minutes or 30 seconds. And teach your team to use this radio lingo when speaking. Over Your message is ...


1

Conference calls have their own etiquette, which some people never seem to pick up or internalize. It sounds like your boss is one of those, and so general reminders are not likely to suddenly become more effective. My best advice (which, in my experience, doesn't always work) is to mention muting microphones at the start of the call. You can use any lead-...


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