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You are right, you want your manager to describe you as a team player. So, the basic problem is that your manager is not appreciating how your efforts will benefit the company. Definitely speak up! Otherwise your manager will never respect you. Keep notes on your business reasons for attending these talks. Socialize it with influential people at your company,...


6

Give your boss's approach a chance What your manager is doing is actually quite common and is called the "hallway track". Some of the most interesting things I've learned and some of the most important connections I've gotten were on the hallway track. In fact, when I go to physical conferences (±15 as a speaker in 2019), I was in maybe 5% of the ...


6

A number of the other answers cover some of these points, but I don't want to repeat comments under a lot of them so here's my take. Go to your manager and ask about the work purpose of going. Ask if the company wants you to be there to learn from the talks, to be seen, to network with other like developers, as a reward for good work etc. If the company ...


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Do you know as a fact that they goofed off? Many attendees at these conferences, especially at the management level, use conferences not for the talks, but for networking. What might seem as "goofing off" to you may be creating new connections or refreshing existing contacts. If they actually just went to the bar by themselves, the other answers ...


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To me this sounds like a threatening comment. Not being a "team player," is usually code for "doesn't get along with others." As for conscientiousness, mentioned in another comment here, don't think your work ethic might not be a threat to some of your co-workers. If you work harder than your colleagues want to, then you may discover ...


72

I have gone to plenty of developer conferences and not attended sessions. They aren't all interesting, believe me! I don't think it is that unusual to miss some for various reasons. To skip ALL the sessions definitely sounds unethical to me, assuming your coworkers truly did goof off instead. (I've done that, too!) Consider the possibility that your boss and ...


4

Any ideas as to how this situation should best be handled? The same way you did it this time. Your manager may have been joking at the time. It's irrelevant. It's not your responsibility to track their attendance. And nothing untoward eventuated to you, so ignore what they do. End of the day, if they're not there they don't even know if you attended or not ...


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Any ideas as to how this situation should best be handled? If you are genuinely interested in the material at the conference and want to listen to all the talks then by all means take full advantage of the conference experience. If your manager or other coworkers decide to skip, you should feel no pressure to join them. If asked why you attended the talks,...


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