New answers tagged

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It helps me to concentrate on what I'm doing and retain specific elements of the idea into my memory bank when I think out loud. It helps me to stay focused when so many other "noises" are vying for my attention, such as the conversation happening down the hall, or a co-workers phone ringing. It seems to me that you should find a way to cope with the ...


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I would say short of trying what other people have suggested here if you have communicated and your management still feels everything is fine then you should have no reason to get all excited either. You come in and leave on a normal day schedule. Work will be there tomorrow. However if they are sweating bullets and still expect you to pick up the load ...


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I think a lot of answers here will tell you to play hardball. And while it is helpful to make yourself clear what you can and what you are willing to do, drawing a line in the sand in a confrontational meeting shouldn't be your first move to change your situation. I'd rather start with a smaller meeting with your direct manager. Prepare a list of everything ...


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TL;DR: Your company seems to be in full panic mode right now, and at least part of the responsible management is absent. Make it crystal clear to whoever is in charge that you have an impossible list of tasks right now and need some priorities to work on; also make it clear that it is not possible (for you alone, at least) to solve everything at once, so ...


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Reduced hours and responsibilities is one approach, but it might look strange if you already feel like you're under suspicion for your previous association. You could also approach this by call a meeting of the various stakeholders - your current boss, perhaps you can include the guy in Germany via conference-call, etc. Then in the meeting, make it clear ...


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Yes, you are doing their job, or part of their job, faster and cheaper than they do. Their reaction is perfectly normal. Someone who doesn't automate but simply does the same job the same way, except twice as fast as everyone else, is also putting someone out of a job. Now let's put this to the extreme: If they worked at half speed they would create a lot ...


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Like an executioner to a convict: this is not personal, this is purely professional. If not me, it would just be somebody else. Maybe this is not actually very good that is going on. And you do not need to prove it is good. But the opposition must happen at the different level than just abusing the final person who does.


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You keeping the company afloat. If you don't automate these tasks, the company will lose out to the competition (who are automating these tasks) and none of you will have jobs. There are already a lot of good answers that deal with other benefits.


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There's several things I want to address as part of my answer. Job Creation The fact of the matter is that automation makes more jobs than it takes away. As automation removes the lower end jobs, or functions of jobs, it releases those people to take on different types of work, which gives them the opportunity to do work that wasn't previously done due to ...


1

Done properly, automation makes producing your output cheaper. It requires fewer person-hours to produce each unit of output. This can result in reducing your workforce. But there are a number of ways that it can result in growing your workforce. When the cost of producing something drops, the change in production costs (assuming consumption stays the ...


1

If you are really interested in answering that charge in one-on-one interactions, perhaps you're willing to research if there's any truth to it? Why exactly is this particular automation project a priority for the company, over everything else you could be doing? If your employer is like mine, most likely its sales are limited by some combination of the ...


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You are enabling people to make more The main way to higher wages - both in a separate company and in the whole industry - is through higher productivity. The definition of productivity is the value of goods or services produced per employee, and making it possible to achieve the same results with less labor is the thing that makes each employee create more ...


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This is the ‘lump of labour’ fallacy. Many people believe that there is a fixed amount of work to be done and thus your experience. But it isn’t true. See: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lump_of_labour_fallacy Of course, you may eliminate part of your colleagues roles. What happens to their jobs is a question for management. But, given your firm is in ...


1

What would be an appropriate and professional way to respond? Like so: Thank you for the flattery, but I don't have that much power. I'm just doing my job, like you. It's tough, but they run this place as a business, not a charity. People are hired to do work the business needs done. If you want them to keep making money when their work isn't ...


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As some others have stated, progress will inevitably result in lost jobs. However, I'm a firm believer that the conversation shouldn't be "how do we get those people working again?" but rather, "How do we get to the point where people are valued for more than their work, and therefor people don't have to work?" If everything were automated, and I mean ...


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I work in a small manufacturing company on special projects that automate some processes It sounds like your bosses already expect to lay off workers as you are hired to automate the processes for them. So your bosses are the one who needs to explain, not you. Honestly I don't think you should say anything at all. Just keep working to do the work you're ...


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Now I think I get their perspective, but from my point of view, the more successfully automated we become, the more orders the company can bring in and therefore it should offset whatever "lost labor" there might be. I've been in a similar situation, working to improve software and workflows that helped automate certain processes. Thing is though... ...


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You can also ask people for ideas about ways to improve the business. I've worked for many businesses, and usually the very people most at risk in this kind of situation - manual low level workers, admin staff, sometimes middle managers - are exactly the ones who know whats inefficient or not working, when higher management don't. I've found their insights ...


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You are not putting people out of work any more than technical and scientific progress in general. In a modern society nobody will pay you for being an alchemist or a swordman, and if you try to work as a slash-and-burn farmer you will end up in jail. Even trying to be a coachman or a handscraftsman will be much more of a challenge than it used to be. ...


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Tell them you are taking the boring stuff away Yes, automation takes work away from employees. However, in order for task automation to make sense, there are 3 properties the task should have: The task is very well understood such that either there are no edge cases or that the edge cases are very well understood; The task is very repetitive, usually being ...


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Personally, I believe you should stick to the truth, people can sense half-truths very well. So a possible answer would be: "Yes." -Short pause- And then: "Do you know why I am doing this? So that this company is not pushed out of the market by some (here put a region where your international competitors are from) company in 5 years down the road, and so ...


3

Automation can result in savings that get passed down to the working class. You may be putting people out of work through automation, but that's not necessarily a bad thing. For a company that operates ethically, automation will allow manufacturing costs to go down and will allow the final price to go down in lockstep without the company suffering ...


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The idea that automation destroys jobs with no benefit to anybody is a fallacy of economics that exists only because the people who believe it focus only on the jobs that are eliminated. In truth, automation reduces the cost of the good or service whose production or provenance is automated. The savings from the labor cost reduction can go to the pockets ...


97

I'm sorry, there's no getting around the fact that you are putting people out of work. This is what automation does -- and if you increase capacity, those extra profits go into the pockets of the business owners, not the workers -- especially not the workers who have been laid off. When I started my career as a computer programmer, we were automating jobs ...


6

Now a problem I often face is that when I explain what I'm doing to some coworkers, some of them get a bit abrasive and accuse me of trying to put people out of work. So stop telling them. If the subject comes up, explain to them that you're working on some automation without going into specific details.


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If you find yourself in a situation where you have to answer to being a part of "automating jobs out of existence", the best thing you can do is to not try to sugar-coat or side-step the issue. Just tell them honestly what you're doing and ask the workers to bring concerns to their management. This is really a failure of leadership in the organization and ...


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"I'm just doing my job, same as you are." In terms of a professional response, that's all that's needed. You don't have to justify anything or go into detail. It's unprofessional of them to complain about that, and you're the wrong person to complain to. When giving a professional response to an unprofessional aggressive question, it's best just to keep it ...


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Most of the tools I have developed over the years was to take away manual input and to use technology to store and use data in an easier way. Any of these tools put at least one person out of a job and sometimes many. The fact is the business already recognized this and asked me to do something. Meaning that one of two things were going to happen. The ...


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In your opinions, what would be an appropriate way to respond? I suggest you try to avoid engaging in conversations of this sort with coworkers that take this the wrong way. You can try to explain to them just how you did here. Tell them that your job is to enhance, not to replace, and that you are actually making their lives easier so they can be more ...


0

You can point out that you're also putting people to work: people who help design and manufacture the automation machines, people who create the parts, people who mine the metals for the parts, people who market and sell the machines - all of those are people who also need jobs. You are helping people do more with less, but there will always still need to ...


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I faced this same problem for many years. You have to constantly reinforce that you're "Increasing our capacity." Then if pressed, explain that the human component is the most valuable part, and that the company is currently wasting that value by assigning humans to repetitive tasks. Emphasize that if the company can increase capacity, then there will be ...


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The HR team is available to help you through a challenging conflict with your manager, both formally an informally. In your discussion, you should express a specific request of the HR team member you meet. You could ask for things like: "I want help preparing and thinking about how to best approach my manager to keep the conversation civil and productive." "...


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What is the best way for me to have this meeting with HR and not place myself in the firing line? My first instinct is to suggest you don't have the meeting at all... If your manager is most of the time nice and understanding, but sometimes he becomes excessively critical, it may be due that he/she is under a lot of stress, deadlines, etc.. This is not ...


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I went through a similar situation. A teammate was taking advantage of my ideas before I introduced them to my superiors. My solution was to hide any idea or suggestion from public eyes and present it in a "continuous improvement" document for the Quality Assurance department. This documentation ended up in the hands of the CEO, the head of the Quality ...


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Step 1: Is there any chance he came up with the same ideas independently? Sometimes there are only a limited number of solutions to problems so really seriously think about whether that has happened here. That doesn't change the next step but might inform your approach. Step 2: You are his team lead. Call him into a private meeting room. Ask him why ...


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A possible approach - Keep two notebooks 'for a while', one current "master", and the other a copy with a time lag of say 2 weeks. The master is not accessible to anyone but yourself. The copy is. Within one week of writing an idea in the master notebook, share it with the boss. After having shared it, copy it to the 'copy' notebook. If the coworker is ...


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