New answers tagged

2

It stinks to be micromanaged by a committee. If this becomes the norm, you will probably want to get another assignment where they don't do that. In the meantime: Respectfully, try to think of the situation from the point of view of these people. In their minds, some or all of these things may be true. Transitions in people are difficult and a little scary....


4

If you believe you could perform the role well, take ownership of the process. Your team and manager will be grateful for you taking the initiative. What I want: Someone takes ownership ( me or anyone) and communicates with business user, once requirement is finalized document it and explain to the team (if necessary). Stop by your manager’s desk, and ...


3

I can manage this developer+ business analyst role by myself and everyone knew that but they are not letting me alone to do this. What I want This is not my job. Why you are asking this? Don't make this unnecessarily complex, this is simple. Let me do it, don't nag Your question seems to have a one-sided slant to it. "I want this" and "I want ...


0

Before making judgements about the decisions of the previous team, you should seek to understand their reasoning and thinking. Take some time to learn about the project from the previous team without pre-judging the state of the project. Ask questions like: “What’s the history of the current tech stack?” Avoid asking “Why are you using such old tech?” ...


5

You stated, It's also very difficult to tell an older life-long tech / design consultant that their work is not good enough That is going to lead to me frame-challenging your question by asking, who gets to decide what counts as good enough? Ultimately, there is some customer or consumer of your product. We need to keep that in mind. As a tech workers, ...


2

I think the most important thing to do is reach out to your boss and ask him what he thinks about the work of the other consultants, what he wants you to accomplish, and how he wants you to proceed. It might be that he also isn't impressed with their work, and is happy that you are pushing them. Or it might be that the work they do is good enough for the ...


0

At my airport there are valet parking lots. You drop your car off, someone parks it for you in a secure lot (where nobody except the employees will get at it). You can get the car cleaned while you are gone. When you come back your car will be warmed up and waiting for you. I'm pretty sure if it was even dinged slightly they would pay for the repairs. Since ...


0

Depending on your location specialist long distance taxis may be an option. e.g. http://www.wintaxcars.com/airport-transfers Local taxi companies also offer favourable/fixed rates for long journeys. In the UK the cost of this kind of transport isn't too far away from the cost of parking + petrol (the taxi is less than double). Obviously costs will vary ...


0

I've had to do this quite a few times. Including some odd fights about "park using this lot, its cheaper" and I usually refused and instead picked the nice safe indoor heated parking stall because you know what, if I have to travel for a week, I am not coming back to a frozen battery in my car after a week of -35C. I can confirm that most airport parking, ...


3

Whatever option you choose, don't forget to compare its cost against the cost of airport parking, which usually isn't cheap. It's possible (but not guaranteed) that you could save money with a taxi rather than parking for a week. Check to see if there is a car rental company with an office near you and the airport you'll have to fly out of. I've done this, ...


1

If you didn’t have a car, or if you had family that would need the car for the time period, what mode of transport to the airport would your employer approve of, and reimburse? There has to be an option for people in that position...unless there is a term in your employment agreement that you will maintain a car for employment purposes? If the latter is the ...


1

If your flight home arrives at a reasonable hour a pair of one-way rentals might be an option instead of leaving a rental in the airport parking lot all week. They're normally a bit more expensive than renting a car and returning to the same place; but a week of parking fees is probably going to be higher. You may also be able to get a better rate on ...


2

Look for a covered parking lot near your target airport. At my airport, they can even wash your car and detail it for an extra fee on the day of your return. Then just take an Uber from the parking location to the airport itself (I assume most places have free shuttles, but taking an Uber/Lyft is usually much faster anyway).


3

The possible options (possible options, not options that you or your boss necessarily like) are: You take a taxi, public transport, or help increasing Uber's annual losses by using them. You rent a car and leave it at the airport. You get a colleague to drive you to the airport and pick you up. You get a family member or friend to drive you to the airport ...


7

This isn't uncommon. Everyone is concerned about that first ding on their brand new car, and wants to forestall it as long as possible; however, it is going to happen sometime. So, it's unlikely that you will get a lot of sympathy from your boss, co-workers, etc. You don't say what your employer will pay for, but in my experience they will usually reimburse ...


13

Some areas have shuttles that run between the nearby towns and the airport. If this is less than the weekly parking rate you may be ok. Also, you have comprehensive coverage on your car for a reason. Check your deductible and make sure it is at a point you are comfortable with paying should something happen. Possible, but not guaranteed, if you car was ...


3

It's not your problem to worry, it's your manager problem. If I was you, I would tell the manager honestly what happened and what HR said, without asking him to intervene. After this point, just keep working as contractor, and don't hope for anything. If you are to get this full-time job, you will hear from manager, otherwise not. Manager can discuss with ...


9

HR people often don't know what qualifies people for technical jobs. It is no surprise that HR speculated on loosely related grounds and produced unfavourable judgement -- it does not mean that you can not thrive in the role that you think you are good for. Ask the manager for help. If manager is on the good terms with HR then (s)he can simply convince HR ...


109

At this point I do not know what to do next. The manager wants me to get on board and I have a strong track record of references that can prove I can do what HR in a 3 hours evaluation deemed me unable to. What would be the correct course of action? Talk to the manager. Explain what you think happened with HR and that you'd still like to work for the ...


11

The answer depends on how the company actually performs hiring -- is HR the gatekeeper with the final say, or does HR give advice, and managers do the actual hiring. The first thing is that hectoring HR, or walking past and making noises and faces, is just horrible advice. If I were the hiring manager and I saw you doing that, I'd consider it childish and ...


5

IF you still want the job, then yes you still apply. Tell your manager you failed their "test" and ask her to request that you be considered regardless. Your manager either has enough pull to override HR's decision or not. There's only one way to find out for sure. If she doesn't have the pull, then you do what @A.I.Breveleri says and continue working as a ...


1

You are maybe being set up. Rudy will fail and the team will know you so you will become his replacement. Too late will you realize that the problem was not with Rudy but with the team, which is a group of imbeciles! I know, not very realistic, but a possibility never the less. Good luck!


5

What do you mean "Do I apply?" Isn't that how you got to the 3 hour ordeal? I have been in your shoes. Several of my jobs I've gotten because I have known someone who gave the hiring manager my resume. The manager put my name through, and I was good. On another occasion being manager's choice was irrelevant. I did not get the job because it was ...


309

Continue to work for this company as a consultant. Conspire with that friendly manager to enlarge your contribution until it is essentially full time or even more. Charge three times what you would have made as a permanent employee. Every time you pass the door to HR shake your head sadly and chuckle to yourself.


2

You were given instructions from John to attend that meeting and he obviously had a reason why you being there would be of value. I would suggest following John's explicit instructions (attending the weekly meeting with Rudy, Phil, and Richie) and his implied instructions (reporting back on what you see in that meeting as an impartial observer). Rudy is ...


2

There isn't much you can do, and there is probably much that you don't know about the situation. It is possible that John, having taken over only 3 months ago, has been working with his bosses on a reorganization plan that would solve the problem, but everything remains status quo until that is announced and implemented. It's also possible (maybe even ...


17

First of all, remember the three Cs: You didn't Cause this problem, you can't Control it, and you can't Correct it. It doesn't sound like an engineer's approach to solving this problem is feasible. An engineer's approach would be to examine the situation, understand the factors, design a solution, and implement it. That's been tried. And "John" rejected it. ...


44

Do you think that the issues with Rudy's team are due to his inability to manage (as opposed to an unmanageable employee) and do you think there is any reasonable chance that anything you tell Rudy can cause him to salvage his team? If the answers are yes and no, respectively, then I think your obligation is to bring it up with John instead. John, by ...


2

Look to yourself first. I sense you are not approaching this correctly. You were hired from outside. The AM you are complaining about may feel they should have been given your job. You don't know what they were like before you joined and you don't seem to refer to this. You need to establish if there has been a change in the AM's attitude since you ...


4

FTMFA, with apologies to Dan Savage. I'm surprised that nobody has answered this with, "Just fire the m'er f'er already." Do it and ask the district manager for forgiveness later. Or not. After all, "My district manager hasn't directly said 'you can't fire him', but if I bring it up she changes the subject". Okay, change the subject yourself and ftmfa. Be ...


3

If you can't work with the AM, can't help the AM improve and can't fire the AM, there is another option: work around them. Assign their duties and authorities to other people. If AM can't remember catering orders, let someone else take care of them. If AM can't track inventory movements, make someone else responsible for that. Now those people don't have ...


7

This is as much about your District Manager as the Assistant Manager. Others have rightly mentioned documenting the problems. One thing I don’t see much discussed in answers is your District Manager’s relationship to this person. In comments you indicated you think she had a hand in hiring him. Given this aspect, try to find out his good qualities and ...


1

First of all, I would ignore the "training" part. If this person indulges in passive-aggressive behaviour or has communications problems, it means he is not aware of some interpersonal dynamics and lacks the instruments to understand them completely. This means, in turn, that he will likely not be able at all to "distill" a good example from other people's ...


3

Good on you for already sharing some feedback with your colleagues. Given that your initial feedback didn't have the desired effect, here are some potential follow-up options: 1. More feedback - Don't be afraid to give the same feedback more than once. Offer concrete examples of the behaviors you dislike and how they effect you. E.g., "Yesterday I saw you ....


0

Of course, the main idea would be to work directly on the source of the irritation. If changing colleagues is not an option, try to explain them the situation and bring them into empathising with you. This is not guaranteed to work, so, if you want to calm your irritation, I would change my perspective and become aware of how priviledged you are compared to ...


1

First, give this person the benefit of the doubt. Text communication doesn't carry much emotional context, and it's unwise to infer that kind of thing from the text. And, complaining about the workload is something he should do with his supervisor. You can simply ignore that stuff. Second, say what you might say in a face-to-face meeting: such things as "I ...


-1

When I do get the answer I want I thank him profusely (but not too much) hoping to "train" him to the kind of communication style I prefer. Is this a dog we're talking about or a person? You can't change someone else's behavior and you certainly can't "train" them to behave the way you want them to behave. You can only change your behavior and change ...


-3

Perhaps he doesn't like you, you are relatively new there and you became his boss... You should have patience. 6 months of work is not enough to tell your boss she should fire him especially if she insists that you have to help him. Look at the things from another perspective, from the perspective of your assistant manager. Try to be correct still and have ...


7

Ask him why he has no motivation. Talk to him. I wonder...is he simply overqualified for the job, or feel it's beneath him? Maybe he feels he should make more money? Maybe he's been there forever and simply has grown bored. Find out why. One poster above mentioned giving written warnings/incident reports. I'd be willing to bet that you ...


4

The first situation you described sounds fairly serious. It sounds to me like it's one step away from stealing, the only difference is that he let another store "borrow" the inventory, rather than him letting himself "borrow" inventory directly (also, did you confirm with the other store that they borrowed the inventory? Maybe he was stealing!) In any ...


27

The best managers help their direct reports to become their best workers If you want to convince your boss that this person needs to be let go, show her that you have done everything you can to try to help solve the problem. Show her that there is nothing that can be done to salvage this person, by trying your best to salvage this person. Identify the ...


8

My Question: How can I convince my district manager to let me fire my assistant manager? She wants improvement and this seems like my only option going forward to improve the store. Don't try to fire the employee, ask to have him re-located instead. First you need to demonstrate to your district manager why this particular employee is not a good fit for ...


50

Float the idea of a Performance Improvement Plan by your boss. Ask if you two can decide on a set list of goals and progress improvement areas for the AM. When/if the AM fails to improve those things listed in a set amount of time, then you and your boss agree the AM should be removed from duty. If your boss outright shoots this idea down, perhaps freshen ...


119

How can I convince my district manager to let me fire my assistant manager? I think your best bet is to build up a written paper trail of each occurrence, where you sit down with the asst. manager and have them sign it. Be sure its clear what the issue was, and what your expectations are going forward. Make the improvements measurable when possible. Do ...


5

Am I silly in doing what I'm doing? I would not thank him profusely for being an ineffective communicator. Take a look at my tips below to help your cause. Is there a way to "help" people not to jump to conclusions, and ask questions instead? I think one of the things you could do is say something like "I see, now can you explain how you got to that ...


1

The problem is that a capable enough VM is going to cost the client ~$250/m in hosting costs ($3000/y, or $9000 over the next 3 years) which is exorbitant given how cost-conscious they are. You as the developer really shouldn't concern yourself with costs - that's your manager job. If he's happy that something is within the client's budget, then that's all ...


5

The boss is the boss. He takes responsibility for his decisions, good or bad. If the client says to him "why are you spewing my money on this stupid thing that we don't need" and he loses the client, that's on him, not you (and if he tries to make it on you, run away VERY FAST). Other than that, he's the boss so do what he wants. You have done your duty ...


0

There can be many different views on exactly what the role of Product Manager should be as well as how teams work. The best thing to do here, is agree. Agree how the team should operate as well as how the interaction between the PM and team should be. Normally, I expect the structure to be such that: PM: Not part of the development team Responsible for ...


1

One suggestion is to volunteer to help the PM write or expand the stories. we had a similar situation where our PO thought that a lot of business domain knowledge he knew was shared by the team, which was not. So when he wrote something that was vague for us, I or other colleague would go to him, explain what we did not know and together we would add the ...


1

I think what you're looking for here is a reference from your current employer. What you want to get out of this is, "I'm going to look for another job anyway, but when my future employer asks my current employer about my performance, I want a good review". Given that you've tagged the question united-states, I presume this company is in the US. I am ...


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