210

Given that you have a contract with your employer, deducting your pay in a unilaterally decision is obviously illegal. Your employment contract basically states that you do a certain work and in return get a certain amount of money for this work - So lowering this amount is a breach of the contract and therefore illegal. You should first talk to your boss (...


137

You should use paper or email. You do your responsible duty in presenting the best (in your opinion) approach and solution, compare and contrast it with the client's desire, explaining the cost and time differential, opportunity cost(s), and risks involved, and deliver it to your client. Then, if your client decides to pursue their path anyway, you will ...


118

What I need help with is mitigating the bad blood that can come between me and my boss due to my decision. I don't think there is anything to mitigate. I see no evidence he has a problem with your position; I suspect he admires your principles. There is going to come a point when he has to fire you. You will make life much easier for him if you can find a ...


112

They'll be taking that money from my salary. Hah. That's not how these things work. Italy's employment laws are pretty complex but there is such a thing as a "fair wage law". Employees have the right to a wage that at a minimum approaches the average for their industry and that average is probably not 0. Beyond that there's also the simple matter that an ...


83

You mention you're working in Belgium, and you mention those are "education" time-off. Being a fellow Belgian, this leads me to think that you're speaking about "Congé-éducation payé" / "Betaald educatief verlof". This time-off is indeed managed by the regional governments (Flanders, Wallonia, or Brussels), but the terms are agreed upon by all those ...


75

Am I legally obliged to do it or can I refuse it alleging that it's not my job because that's not our business and what I was hired for? Refusing to do you job is called Arbeitsverweigerung and a reason for an Abmahnung, the first step to being fired for cause (Verhaltensbedingte Kündigung). Basically, even religious reasons are no general excuse for ...


64

It's a very common situation that comes up in the workplace - the all-knowing superhero is now gone (for good or bad, and for whatever reasons), and the team of just regular everyday normal people is left to pick up and keep going. Step 1. Talk to your management and let them know the facts. Don't accuse, judge, or criticize. Just explain that as you and ...


54

can I refuse it alleging that it's not my job because that's not our business and what I was hired for? Well, yes but there could be consequences. He is your boss, so generally speaking since this falls into what I would consider your job description you need to do it. You may not like the upcoming project - but there is nothing unethical about what you'...


52

I was an international consultant and an expat for 7-8 years. The idea/impression I have got by your tale, is that you are being taking advantage of in order to take from you a negotiation leverage. Stalling tactics, misrepresentation about your importance in the project/representation, hiding details about the importance of a project and often huge sums ...


52

How can I make clear that I would rather avoid the whole thing? You could just go to your manager and say "I think this trip is a waste of my time, I'm not going." Of course your employer may well respond with "I think continuing to employ you is a waste of our time, I'm not going to do it any more." On the other hand, I'm a junior with expertise on a ...


50

Right now, my plan is to just pretend I too couldn't figure out how to do this task (remember this is a bonus "would be nice" task), because I don't want to provide my employer with my proprietary method and code that is worth, based on my past earnings from this former client alone, about USD $45k/year, and evidently more in some applications. Don'...


46

So, should I tell my boss, even though Bill will tell him in a few days anyway? No. ...if I tell my boss, then I'm screwing Bill. Yes, you would be. If I don't tell my boss, I'm (in a very small way) screwing AppCorp. No, you wouldn't be. Because of the timing involved and the fact that there aren't any crazy, illegal or unprofessional activities ...


39

While I totally agree with the other answers that it would be illegal to withhold pay from you. I think there is another aspect that is worth looking at. If you discover substandard work that has been done by your company it is generally a bad idea to start by pointing that out to the customer. It's much better to take the information to your own company ...


37

Talk to a lawyer first Make sure you understand the legal ramifications of any actions before talking with your employer. Do this ASAP. Research applicable company policies Does your company have a conflict of interest policy that prohibits employees from acting as vendors to the company? Make sure you know the rules. Decide what you're personally ok ...


32

Edit after the edit of OP: This is a general answer for unpaid leave. For special laws on educational leave in Belgium see answer by @Someone Your manager is actually just doing his job, which is to maximize the profits of his employer. You do have to realize you can't be friends with company. A company can't be thankful, and it should not. You can be ...


28

You can only pick and choose depending on what's on the table. Right now this is it. Third option: Put more stuff on the table. When there is a risk that you get fired because they don't have any projects for you, then try to come up with a project yourself. See what business your company is doing in the other areas and check if you have any idea how ...


28

From the boss' point of view, the client insisting on a specific employee, rather than on anyone who can work on their issue, is a problem. Bob might leave, be sick, be on vacation, or be requested by two clients simultaneously. For keeping the client happy, your employer's bus factor is currently one, and that needs to change. In addition to you learning ...


25

Your company should be dealing with this. So pass it on to them. The client should NOT be dealing direct with you in anything not immediately relevant to your tasks. You shouldn't even have scanned in the document the first time. Email all correspondence to your manager to deal with. If the client asks, tell them that your company is dealing with it and ...


25

Contracts are very strict in Italy, and unless you signed a not standard one, they have specific minimum wage tables and hourly/monthly wages clearly defined. There are very limited cases your employer can subtract any amount from it, and that is if you willfully cause economic damage to your company (this has to be very well documented) or if you suddenly ...


24

In the middle of last year, an organizational psychologist was hired to establish a set of core values. Ugh. A company that has to hire an outsider to establish "values" means they never had any to begin with. Always a bad sign. Near the end of the year, a business consultant was called in to try to restructure the company to be more hierarchical and ...


23

Direct answer Sorry if my answer may sound a little harsh, but it is what it is: Do what they ask of you. Reviewing CVs is absolutely part of your job as a software developer. Do you expect some HR guy (which I assume you have none in your small company) to decide who to pick? Based on which expertise? You will, in the rest of your professional life, ...


21

I agree with the other replies about the unethical behavior of your current company, and also about the fact that it is an illegal move. As an Italian who has had some issue with previous employers, I may advice you to seek help from a union. Depending on the area where you live you could have different choices; however, if you live in a rural area (let's ...


20

Tell your consulting company -- give them notice -- and let your company's sales rep or business person tell the client. That's their job, not yours. Is it a courtesy for you to tell the client? Maybe you could argue that. But I don't agree. I do not think they should hear it from you. Seriously. This business relationship doesn't belong to you ...


19

Having been in this situation myself several times, your best bet is to point out the pros and the cons of both choices, advise on the course that you recommend, but then go with his decision. There could be a lot of reasons why your client wants to start over from scratch. Maybe it has a long history of bugginess and end users have lost confidence in it. ...


17

Unless you have a visa that you aren't telling us about, as a US citizen you're currently working illegally in France. You need a work visa, and it can't be arranged while you're in France, it has to be arranged from another country. They may (I don't know for sure) ask why you were in France for an extended period just before applying for a work visa - it ...


17

Titles are cheap in small companies. As "CTO", will you be leading the technical direction of the company, or just providing code maintenance? Questions to ask: Is the amount of technical support expected of you worth whatever the current value of 5% of the company? How do you define or limit the expectations as to what is "maintenance"? How would you ...


17

Yes, there is. It's called Stack Overflow, and it's free. Lots of great developers hang out there just to sharpen their skills on questions.


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