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345

Act out of professionalism, not out of spite. That said, you can act professionally without making it easy for them. You need to get your resume out, NOW Start scheduling interviews ASAP, take time off if you need to, with or without compensation for those interviews DO THE MINIMUM REQUIRED It's not personal for them, it shouldn't be for you. They are ...


211

Such a contract clause is very uncommon for salaried employees. Usually an employee can only be made liable for any damages they cause during their job when they have caused the damage intentionally or at least were grossly negligent (varies depending on where you are). By forcing employees to register a company and work as a contractor, the company is ...


162

I would write the letters of resignation, but do not leave them on the desk. It is unprofessional and cowardly. This is a business relationship and should be treated as such by both sides. However I would have my desk prepared for immediate departure. I would present your letters to the manager while acknowledging that you are aware that the normal ...


123

Tell him about your experiences with this person and why you think it would be a bad business fit while also letting him know that this is his decision to make. Give some examples via your personal experiences to convey your point. "Hey Paul, I know you are eager to make money, but I want to help you do it with the right person and I don't think Bob is that ...


123

Don't pass up a legitimate opportunity for visibility. Being seen doing good work is important for your career. My reaction to things like this is "It only takes a couple seconds to change the setting. The real trick is knowing which setting to change :)." or some variation on that. Mind set wise remember, a very small portion of your wage is flipping ...


123

There are a number of reasonable responses you could make. That one is rather extreme. In particular, the way you've presented it it sounds rather like blackmail - something you might not want to present the appearance of. The better way to handle it, I think, would be a bit of an adjustment. Straight up tell the man that there is too much work to get it ...


86

Consider, the time to complete the project and your end date are not related in any way. My first position would be to develop a reasonable timeline for the project then present that to management, irrespective of your end date. At that point, they can either pay out your PTO and end the contract early offer you an extension until the project is complete ...


77

As Paul is your friend he does deserve the benefit of your experience. You would warn your friend if you heard they were going to a mechanic that you've had bad experiences with so why not a business contact. Be a friend and don't let your friend get burned.


70

What I would do is option 3. I would prepare for being escorted out that day and prepare a written transition document of where everything stands. I would make sure all code was checked in to a branch at least. (This doesn't apply to any non-programmers reading this.) I would clean up anything I wanted on my computer (such as if I had personal pictures I ...


55

If you withhold the data of your own experience with Bob, you are not looking out for Paul. Yes, Paul is an adult and he makes his own decisions, but he can only make decisions based on the data that's available to him - you are skewing the game by not making available to him the data of your experience with Bob. Don't tell us that Paul is making an ...


53

It's simple. Instead of deflecting the compliment, accept it with grace. Executive: wow. I don't know how you guys do all this stuff. I wish I knew what you do about computers. You: well, I'm here to help. Glad I could assist you. (or) You: Just doin' my job. Gotta take care of folks. (or) You: Yup, computers can drive ya crazy. But I've got your ...


45

It is quite common. But it is also quite common to negotiate such an agreement so that it doesn't burden either side unfairly. The company stated that these clauses are only to protect the knowledge gained with techniques, protocols and the like closely related to my work. For example knowledge on how to access certain hardware components. Great. Then ...


37

First, you can likely find the products at a lower cost than someone who does not have your expertise. If you buy enough, you might even get volume discounts the customers would never get for one-time purchases. You are also much more likely to get the right thing the first time (I don't go buy parts for my plumber or electrician when I need work on my house)...


36

First, what you need is legal advice. I am not a lawyer, so take the following for what it might be worth. If you have to set up your own company, you're not salaried; you're a contracted worker. As such, you have a say in the contracts you enter into. In the USA, employers cannot legitimately classify you as a contractor if they dictate when/where you work,...


35

It sounds like much of your unhappiness is with the client company. You could ask for a different assignment, but don't hold your breath. I've tried to obtain a different assignment while in your position, but your employer won't want to put you in a different position without being able to simultaneously back-filling your spot with your current client. ...


34

An important fact to realize is that no matter how simple a process may appear to you this is not the case for those lacking that knowledge. Sure, changing a Windows setting is easily done if you know it's even an option. A quick Google search might give the user insight, but even then they might not understand all the implications and rather rely on an ...


32

Speak to the actual people YOU work for, who placed you at the client site. find out what they wish you to do. Prepare your documents, your computer files, etc. Write that letter, with a 2 week notice included. Prepare yourself for suddenly being walked off premises but let THE CLIENT be the one to march you out or let you stay 2 weeks. Your assumptions ...


23

Should I warn my friend about Bob or leave it alone and mind my own business? Warning your friend is both personally and professionally prudent and the ethical thing to do. Without being seen as engaging in slander, you can simply tell your friend something to the effect of "Given the nature of your work, I would be cautious about working with Bob or his ...


23

You'd bill for the hours you worked. If you worked 10 hours this month, bill 10 hours. If you want to bill 10 hours a week whether or not they have work for you, that's something that you'd need to include in the contract you negotiate. Rather than just specifying a maximum number of hours, specify a minimum number of hours and potentially something about ...


21

As a fellow programmer, I completely understand how you feel. I have worked for several companies and have discovered that culture matters. Here are a few points to keep in mind: If you got an issue free programming job right out of school, you are lucky. The interview will rarely reveal a companies true culture. ALWAYS keep updating your resume and keep ...


20

Tell both recruiters immediately - like within seconds of A telling you they want to send you to C, say "another recruiter is already proposing me there." The two recruiters will have a way of settling this, either who talked to you in general first (A) or who proposed you to C first (B). The choice is not yours to make. There is a good chance if C realizes ...


19

You should explain to your boss exactly why the timeline for this project is unreasonable. If they still decide that your end date remains unchanged then you simply do your assigned work to the best of your ability until either that date has arrived or you have found a new job. You should be looking for a new job no matter what while you still have one as ...


18

Yes. A company reimburses you for a trip not a flight or hotel. There are things that can happen on a trip that will cause more money to be spent. As long as you are following the company guidelines they should reimburse you for something as basic as a cancelled flight and accommodations. I have never heard of a company not reimbursing this, so if this ...


18

There's no need to overcomplicate this. Just tell them that your fee to work on this project is $X. If they find that number too high, they are free to look elsewhere. There's no reason for you to undervalue your time to work on this project. You could lower your $X somewhat if you feel that you will gain a great deal (personally/professionally) from ...


16

Remember, if the pirates get away with the first ship, they're more likely to try again on another. You really have to stand your ground. The alternative is you lose control of the project, and eventually everyone is miserable. The 'fixed price, fixed deliverable' software job is usually a mistake, for precisely this reason. Imagine the surgeon is about ...


16

My impression is that your supervisor has been told to get rid of you, independent of the quality of your work, and that the complaints are made up without the purpose of getting rid of you. So first, ignore any negative feelings when they complain about your work. There's nothing wrong with it. They know it, and you know it. So when the supervisor says "...


16

As both a hiring manager and a contractor hopefully I can answer this: The day rates you say are OK, good roles can pay 600+. They are paying for your flexibility, your skills and for their convenience. I've had contracts where I've been expected to relocate ( or travel and stay mon-fri) at a days notice. I've had 6 month contracts that give notice after ...


16

Things like that (when the invoice should be paid, how many rounds of revisions are possible and how much time the client has to inform you about them) should be agreed on in the contract signed before starting the project. If they are there, you just say "according to the contract you need to pay me first". If they aren't there you need to negotiate ...


15

But how do you kill this problem by the root? You don't get rid of it completely. A way to get close is to have someone on the receiving end who has "been there" in development of whatever you are contracted to do. If you are negotiating with a software developer while working a software dev project, they will understand somewhat the increases in work ...


15

As a freelancer I see this clause a lot. It's very common. It's usually a misguided attempt at a non-compete clause. What the company usually wants is assurance that you're not going to go run off and build a similar app using the internal "secret" knowledge you gained from them, or that you're going to be charging them to work on a different project while ...


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