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0

Don't be afraid to talk to them about overdue invoices. Be firm and do not bring your personal condition or concerns (like "paycheck to paycheck") into the discussion. Always work under a legal contract. My usual contract states that the client does not own the code until all invoices are paid in full. Put your terms on every invoice. My typical terms ...


0

Rough napkin math: They owe you $11k, at $70/hr. $11000/70 = 157 hours, or roughly 4 weeks (at 40 hours per week), or roughly 1 month. Check your contract. On what schedule does it say you should be paid? If it says monthly, I'm not sure you have a case. If it says less than monthly, you have a problem. Here's the problem: They are paying you, yes, but ...


2

This is a bit more general than your current situation, but I think it generally fits. You need to get a lawyer draw up a proper enforceable contract for any future employment that includes Clear rules on when payment happens (bound to deliverable or monthly independent of whether you deliver on time) Clear rules on what happens if payment is not on time, ...


30

Living paycheck to paycheck on contract work is nuts I am 26 and this is my first contracting experience. I was not the first to be late (me being late on deliverable items, my employer being late on invoice payments). Living paycheque to paycheque at the time, and still am, this is a serious issue for me. I was in dire straights at the time... So you'...


2

Can you do the demo without giving them the code? This would show you have the work done. If they ask for the code, you say "we should talk about the payment issues first". Be firm, state that you have done your part and you need them to do theirs. Otherwise it makes no sense for you to put more effort into the project. Be polite and nice. If the issue of ...


3

In addition to other answers here, I will add that this is a normal situation in companies. It is a pain for us as contractors. But that is why in the future you must add a clause to the contract, such as: Invoices shall be paid within fifteen (15) days of receiving it by email or in person, otherwise interests will apply starting from day sixteen (16) at ...


5

You say your invoice has not been paid for two weeks. Unfortunately for you, that's a common situation. It is probably not due to dissatisfaction with your work, but to a business process at your customer company's accounts-payable department. In the USA anyway, many companies pay invoices "net 30", meaning they pay 30 calendar days after the invoice is ...


10

As you don't see a future with this company any more, your focus is now square on recovering the money, and you have one thing going for you - the work you've done so far. While I can't imagine that this will end without going to court, there is one thing to try first, and for that you need to send an email to the company which, more or less, follows: ...


0

Talk to them. Then, if they don't pay you, talk to a lawyer. The first step to resolving this situation would be to talk to them about getting paid. If this works, great, you've gotten paid. If it doesn't work, however, consider talking to a lawyer. $11,000 is no joke, and a lawsuit to recover that much money is entirely justifiable. As a contractor, you ...


43

Get a lawyer. Now. Take copies of all paperwork. They will probably advise you to stop work until all outstanding payments are made. "If you want to have this chat then I suggest we do it face to face" Yes - they're trying to avoid further paper trail. I have foolishly given optimistic deadlines for things Yes, that was a mistake. Learn from it ...


82

No you don't strongarm or anything like that. You just politely send your invoice and ignore anything that doesn't include payment. Don't enter into a dialogue, they already know the issue. This puts the ball squarely into their court to resolve the issue and get what they need. Don't wait until they have a replacement. Lastly never give excuses like ...


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