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1

I'll start with how it could backfire. Your idea could be stolen You could be frozen out of the process You could be vastly under-compensated Your current employment could be in jeopardy if they think you are developing on company time or stealing company secrets. You could be asked to sign a non-compete clause, exclusivity clause. Some companies have ...


0

This depends a bit how "protectable" the idea is. I assume you don't have an actual patent on it, but If I understand your post correctly, you already disclosed your idea at time of hire as your own IP, i.e. it's your property and not governed by your current contract (which is good!) At this point, that mainly just means that the company can't ...


1

Interesting issue, I think the first thing to double check your contract to ensure there is no over lap with a third party (if possible). The best advice I got with regards to dealing with contracts and legal issues is get advice up front, as trying to solve issues retrospectively (on the back foot per say) takes more effort and resources (think time and ...


7

Just remember: For the purposes of this conversation, you are not an employee. You are a businessman with a business proposal you are pitching to the company. And you need to approach that conversation accordingly.


9

How should I approach this? Without disclosing any details of your idea, ask the CEO if they would consider providing revenue sharing in return for granting the company full rights to an idea, assuming they conclude the idea is worthwhile. Do you think it could back-fire? Yes. If the company concludes that you are more interested in your idea than in your ...


5

Yes, that is a classical problem. By the spirit of the law, limited time contracts are only allowed in Germany, if the work itself is limited time. For example, hiring a secretary on a one-year contract would only be valid if you knew you only had work for one year, maybe as attorney with a new, bigger case that will end eventually. Or hiring a construction ...


-1

Your suggestion to the company will be refused, most likely. You need to consider why the company has this contract requirement. It is typical in the tech financial sector. They don't want to be in a position where they are stuck with an employee. Having many employees as contractors allows them to quickly increase or lower their workforce. There's no ...


2

but now my collaborators contacted me to say that they'll send me the remaining 24% of the project. Am I still obligated to do the work? Since your initial contract is complete, you are not obligated to do any additional work. Should you choose, you could sign a new contract calling for the completion of the project, but that is up to both you and them to ...


2

I want to say no, but you might want to double check your contract and how it is worded. If the project is to completion, then they might have a legal standing. Otherwise if they paid you, then you are good to go. If they withheld payment and demand that you complete the project, then you might need to see a lawyer on how best to proceed especially if the ...


13

IF they are asking you to work for free, then no, you don't have to do that. IF they want the project done, they need to pay you and they need to sign a new contract. If producing the report wasn't in your contract, than you are not obliged to complete it. So long as you fulfilled your responsibilities, as outlined by the contract, you are fine. ...


0

I completely agree with Matthew Gaiser's answer - there's no general legal prohibition against working two jobs at the same time. As a Canadian myself, working in the tech sector, I've known many colleagues who had a "side hustle" personal business in addition to working full time with me at whatever company. It's no big secret, and no one cares, ...


3

This depends on the company rules. The law is fine with it. Individual companies have rules on this that can differ, but legally it is completely fine. Lots of Canadians have 2nd jobs or freelance on the side. I work for a local government and they are fine with it as long as it does not generate a conflict of interest.


3

Most of the time, keeping secrets do more harm than good. Once that secret is revealed, above everything, you lose the trustworthiness. In this scenario, there's nothing to hide, as the part-time job during an academic course is not usually forbidden, rather the contrary. Check with the research institute about their rules of part-time work Most likely you ...


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