205

Is this normal? In my experience, this is not normal. What typically happens is your employer would work with you in the transition by supporting you with training. Or alternatively, you employer could allow you a bit more time to do tasks in this new technology to account for the learning curve. I will say however, as a developer myself, it is on me ...


124

This new team member can be quoted as saying "It's not upon your employer to give you time to learn" and that we should all be doing this in our spare time at home. This new team member is confused. And unless this new team member is your boss, or is funding your paycheck, then this new team member can be safely ignored. If an employer wants you to ...


51

It's not just CEOs. It's pretty unusual for anyone in a leadership position to step down and take a lower role in that organization. To start with it usually makes for a strained relationship between the former leader and their new peers. If someone didn't get on well with the former leader they may try to take some sort of revenge now they are equals. Or ...


50

Good companies invest in their staff. Technology is a rapidly changing industry - there is always something new to learn. It is much cheaper to keep a current member of staff up to standard than to replace them with a new hire, which costs time and money in recruitment and getting up to speed. Good companies recognize this, and provide their staff with ...


44

If the person won't send you the information in writing, do option #1# and then send an email to that person saying. "From our meeting, I took the following notes. I'll start working on this immediately. Please let me know if I need to add or correct anything". Then you've got your paper trail AND credibility. Plus, you are actively taking control ...


19

As a rule of thumb, what you do in your free time is none of your employer's business. Their right to assign tasks is limited to work hours. They hired you for a specific position, presumably after interviewing you for that position, and the skill set that you had at that time. They have since then changed their mind and decided they want a different skill ...


17

At any career level, having someone replace you, and then having to witness daily how that new person performs at your previous the job (either better or worse than you), would be extremely frustrating to most folks. Further, the new boss doesn't want to deal with the baggage and office politics of a disgruntled employee who has been demoted. Finally, as ...


15

You were worried about submitting a critical document so you were distracted not unfocused. In fact, it was your focus on the document that resulted in you misplacing the pen drive. It was your single minded focus on one thing that caused you to lose track of the other. Was losing the pen drive stupid? It was more like like inevitable given that you were ...


11

Admit that you seem to have misplaced it. If you think you have it but it got into the dirty laundry or whatever, you can say that and say you're continuing to look for it. If you realy think you lost it admit that. Trying to hide will make matters worse. Depending on how confidential the info on that drive was, you may be in serious trouble ... or you ...


9

In most cultures/organisations, demoting is extremely rare, except perhaps as a step towards dismissal. Demoting someone is extremely demotivating, the assumption is that this person will be resentful, have trouble accepting instructions from people who were once peers or subordinate, will have no reason to assume they have a shot a promotion, etc. Whether ...


7

Broadly speaking, I feel like the responses to these sorts of questions don't consider the reality of the market. In short, being a developer is all about knowledge and experience and often knowing more means you can experience more which then reinforces what you know. It makes you extraordinarily valuable if you can do this. That said, consider your ...


7

I don't think telling him he is wrong is the right approach, I think instead, you should talk to him about your workplaces etiquette. I agree with you, this is totally disrespectful to the cleaning staff, but based on the information provided, I think it is safe to say that your co-worker does not care about that. What I would do instead is tell try to ...


7

who is responsible for defining and maintaining the company or business standards? Ethics are... complicated. You can't just decide for a product or process, "this is ethical" and expect everyone to believe/agree. There are: Cultural factors. What is appropriate in some cultures is not in others. Social factors. Current trends also have a significant ...


7

I would personally approach this as trying to have my cake and eat it, too. I would at least try. Is the problem the time involved in your projects, or the skill required? If it's the time, that's much easier. Don't say "I want the same workload as the average worker bee". Just explain that you need more time, and don't mind if you get less pay. ...


6

What should I do now? You should immediately explain what you have done to try and locate the device, and explain where you think it is. That way, the company can decide how to deal with the situation, as far as recovering the device. Should I consider today as my last working day? Normally, my manager never gets mad with anyone nor is he very strict, ...


6

I am an information security professional, my first thought at reading your story is: the data loss needs to be reported! Depending on what was on the USB stick (passwords, login credentials, confidential / classified documents, etc) your security department may need to take steps to correct the loss and prevent further damage to the company. For this ...


6

You have two choices: You hire an accountant, or you do it yourself. Your accountant is getting £170 a month for very little work. The government websites are quite decent, so you can do this yourself. As a software developer, I don't expect you to have too many different expenses (one big chunk for using your car or paying for public transport, and that's ...


6

Normally, you would say things like "I decided", "we decided", "our team leader decided". If you say "the decision was made to do X", or "it was decided to do X", especially if it becomes obvious that it was a bad decision, that says quite clearly that you don't want to mention names, and that you deny having contributed to this decision.


5

Email is the least efficient way of communicating with someone. It is, however, an excellent way to make sure that what was said, is remembered the right way. You should meet with your colleague. Then, you should talk out exactly what still needs to be done. Then, either one of you puts that in an email, and sends it out to the other for archiving. (And ...


5

If they ask you to send emails to them and that results in more than they can read, then your obligation is to send the emails. (More on that later.) If they do not ask you to send the emails but you are sending them anyway, and it is more than they can keep up with, then you should probably send fewer emails. In the first case, knowing that they want the ...


4

The competition at that level is incredibly fierce and, in order to win one of these coveted positions, it's generally not enough to be good at your job. You have to play a lot of dirty politics which often involves stabbing people in the back. If a CEO were to get demoted and he opted not to leave the company, there's simply no way his successor would be ...


3

Totally not. Not even worth discussing it. Your free time is yours. If they want you to spend extra time - they have to pay overtime. If you agree to study for free for them next time they may ask you to do accounting for them on your spare time.


3

Personally, I would tell my manager. I'd say "He's a slob and it needs to end, it's irritating everyone." Because while it may seem trivial, how someone acts in the smallest of tasks sometimes echoes in larger tasks. Will he "ignore the crumbs" of his work? When I see someone who is so brazen about their disorder, I bring it up. Teams need to collaborate and ...


3

The new guy is almost right, the following statement is true in general: "It's not upon your employer to give you time to learn" and we should all be [learning] in our spare time at home. Although this is correct from a certain perspective, it is not correct in your circumstance. In general: It is actually on you to be familiar with new things. ...


3

Document everything, if they ask you to do something, get it in e-mail. Keep a paper trail and make sure you have your obligations covered. It's harder for someone to argue that it's your fault when you have an e-mail (Or similar) showing where the issue came from. However, being a project manager, you should have the right to refuse something that this ...


3

I think there's a subtle yet very important point being glossed over - both in terms of the question you linked, and in terms of the entire concept of being "responsible" for emails. It's the difference between reading an email, versus being able to mentally process, summarize, and store their contents. It's the difference between having information, and ...


3

I would risk to say the job of some CEOs is being fired in the end. I have been at least in two organisations bought by a larger one, that when they wanted to pass unpopular measures/fire multiple people they hired a CEO for them to be the face of those measures. And in one of them, the actual interim CEO, a partner, stepped down and went to his former ...


2

Your documentation should be 100% neutral. As you mentioned, you should not put any of your personal input into the documentation regarding how you feel about the project, people who worked on the project, design details, etc. If you kept a good paper trail or have the paper trail from the people who were on the project, you will be fine since it will be ...


2

You are documenting the system as-is. You are not passing judgement on it or those who wrote it. Don't worry, if the documentation is clear enough, others will pass judgement for you. If the app is properly stored in various, date stamped versions, it should be clear that your document was produced well after the system was "done". If the app is so big ...


2

How should I mention my role in my resume? It would help if you could clarify some things from your post. But, I will venture to say that if this is a college project I do not recommend you include it as work experience (as it is not actually work experience). If you really want to include it, a better place to do so would be in some sort of "Relevant ...


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