54

Why respond at all? If it's clear that the recruiter is simply spamming anyone who looks appropriate for the role he's selling, regardless of whether they are interested in a move, he probably won't even notice a failure to reply. And in my experience, if that's the case, a "not interested" has no more effect (and takes marginally longer).


49

Here's a no fuss straight forward approach: Hello, I saw the role regarding [job title], and am interested as it's in my area of expertise. I find that the duties of this role differ between companies, so can you give me more details on its scope? Thanks, Riku


22

No it is not an invitation to use more familiar address. They still signed off with Dr Kelvin, so that is how you should address them. Until they either sign off as Kris or otherwise indicate "you can call me Kris", you should continue addressing them as you already have been.


22

Dont waste time bother responding, they are just doing a keyword search and mass mail everyone they get a hit on. But when you are looking for a new job, make note of which recruiters have a way of working by spamming and never bother to read the resume. Those are not the ones you want to represent you. Every now and then I do get a mail from a recruiter ...


13

Is 2 months acceptable, or too long? It depends solely on the employer, and on the potential employee. In some situations I have hired really good folks and have been willing to wait a few months. But in other cases, I need to fill a vacancy quickly, and 2 months would not be acceptable. Do I increase my chances by saying "immediately"? Probably, but ...


10

"the sender knows I saw the letter almost immediately" - not true. Most productivity advice is about not checking emails all the time, but doing so only a few times per day, because email can seriously interrupt your "flow". And in fact, doing just this could solve your problem. As you note correctly, answering immediately will train your colleagues to ...


10

They said you were literally hired then never got back to you for the details. If anything pestering them 24/7 about this is warranted. You do not just tell candidates they are hired and then make them wait or ghost them. I think you are handling it as best as you can. I would try contacting them again if they still do not get back to you, maybe they had ...


9

Stick with the truth. In 6 years of regular job searching as a consultant/contractor, this is rare. I would evaluate this as a very good recruiter/HR and/or strong interest. Respond to the email with something like this: I am very pleased to hear good feedback on my last interview. I am currently interviewing with multiple other opportunities, but ...


9

Another alternative is to return it to the sender. Enclose it with a letter explaining that the addressee is not longer with the company, and indicating who is now responsible for their previous company related responsibilities. The lesson to be learned here is that letters ought not to be addressed to a person, but to a title or responsibility. It would be ...


8

Using your analogy, it's even weirder if he holds up the box and ask people and no one so much as turns around to look at him. A polite and professional reply will make it clear that you're not interested, and won't leave your boss wondering what's going on: Thank you for providing me with this opportunity, but I must respectfully decline. I am very ...


7

By explicitly criticizing the style and "requesting" different behavior you are putting the person in the position of admitting they're wrong and then "obeying your orders." Many people simply won't do that. If someone is communicating using an email style that you find unacceptable, the best response is to model the correct behavior in your own ...


7

You don't lose anything if you ask. Just acknowledge to the sender your delay (and maybe the reason), and ask if the position is still open. In the worst case scenario you just get a no - or no answer at all.


7

Most of the times, the best approach is just being straightforward. Follow whichever is applicable in the below order: If you have a contact number provided in the job listing, call them up and ask about the job description. If you have don't have a contact number, but a point-of-contact email ID, drop an email showing your interest and asking about the ...


6

This blog cites a load of reasons given by style guides. The conclusion is basically that contractions can carry an informal or friendly tone - which you may or may not want in your professional writing, depending on the professional context. Some guides also say that contractions can make writing harder to read for non-native English speakers (well, readers)...


6

To me this seems like a red flag - The person interviewing you, who if they are saying "you're hired" seems to me would be some form of management, said they'd hire you tomorrow and then never followed up. If someone fails to live up to their promises - not to mention outright ghosting you, not providing an explanation and not being available for ...


5

Unnecessary interruptions is a pet peeve of mine, a single phonecall or email can cost me and my team about 15/30 minutes depending on how long it takes us to deal with the issue and then get 'into the groove' of whatever it was we were doing. There have been specific studies into just how negatively programmers are affected by interruptions and our team ...


5

In contemporary western culture is an email an acceptable format for a "thank you" note? Yes, in contemporary western culture, an email is acceptable. The majority of people who even bother to send thanks at all use email. But, do you really want to settle for acceptable, when you could do better? I've interviewed a lot of candidates over the years, and ...


5

If you want to avoid anything appearing inappropriate refer to him that same way that your coworkers do, first name, Mr last name, etc. You are both at work and adults, this isn't Greg Brady deciding he is a grown up and calling his parents Mike and Carol.


5

Rule #1: Never lie. Rule #2: Don't ignore a perfectly reasonable request or question Rule #3: Answer a simple question with a simple answer, unless there is a good reason to make it complicated. Rule #4: If you feel you need to spin it, make sure it's factual correct and that it serves a clearly defined purpose. Applying the rules I'd go with rule #3: "I ...


5

Well, Agent 00 you missed your mark. The next day you should have called the interviewer reminding him about the meeting he wanted to set up with you that day. He actually made an oral contract with you and you would have been well within your rights, arguably obliged to follow up and turn it into writing. Now the moskwa river is frozen and spies are back ...


4

Don't overthink this. Which of the following are appropriate ways to end your business email: Most people won't care. Any of your examples are fine. Best regards / With regards / Kind regards all convey the same idea. Pick one and put it in your email signature and don't worry. Are some more formal than others? Perhaps "Best regards" is more formal. ...


4

If the interview process has been handled electronically then definitely send an email. If the application/resume was done via a website, the initial screen by phone, and the full interview by Skype and screen camera your only contact has been via computer and phone. Depending on the job the mailing address portion of their contact info for each employee ...


4

The other answers are good for the literal question, but I'll take a different perspective and posit that a job description being so vague that you can't even confidently start the interview process is such a red flag that you should probably just skip over such jobs entirely. Usually, it means the truthful answer to So, what's the job? is We don't really ...


3

Decline to HR including a "Thanks for considering me" with your boss CCed. This makes your answer and your appreciation clear.


3

First of all, emails are made for asynchronous communication. Expectations that you have to answer almost immediately are not appropriate. If someone has this expectation she/he could give you a call or use a chat system instead (if you are using this). Because emails are an asynchronous communication medium, you can answer them at a time which is ...


2

It would depend on what your role in the company is. If you're a manager, escalating with that employee's manager would be appropriate. If you're a supervisor or a line-level employee, then you should CC your manager on your follow-up, and then send a second email to your manager explaining the roadblock and reminding them of the implications. It's then ...


2

To add to @Joe Strazzere's (very good) answer, I would say that normally two months seems long. However there are a vast number of factors that come into play for me as a hiring manager: What is my team's workload? When are my deadlines? How does a delayed start risk my project? What could be pushed back to accommodate a later start? Are there background/...


2

I'd explain my problem with the style of these emails. You appear to have explained it to us (namely, the extras annoy and distract you, making it harder for you to deal with the emails and probably with your colleague in general), but have you explained it to your colleague? I happen to be the kind of person who needs reasons for everything. When a ...


2

I would just check how people call each other in this environment. If you notice other colleagues address him with his full title, you should do the same. If everyone picks a way to address something, just choose whatever you feel most comfortable with. If the Doctor in this case feels uncomfortable with the way you address him, he will (or should) mention ...


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