162

In my experience, "pulling all nighters" isn't perceived as someone dedicated as one would hope. It's typically perceived as someone who has poor planning skills. I wouldn't mention all-nighters except in context of there being an unforeseen emergency that needed to be dealt with. Otherwise you'll likely have your ability to manage your time questioned. ...


96

If I saw drawings such as you have shown above, I would almost certainly reject the application as unprofessional for almost any profession. If you need to include graphics in a professional document (and I would argue that it would be rare to need to do so in a cover letter), then the graphics need to be professionally prepared, not hand-done sketches. ...


79

The best way to show that you aren't particularly interested in salary is... just don't mention it. What you're looking for is typically referred to as a positive work/life balance. That's the term I would use on a cover letter, along with the things that for you are important and are looking for in an employer. Remember, recruitment is a two way street. ...


78

Is it appropriate to include drawings in a cover letter? When the job you are applying for involves a significant amount of drawing, then it might be appropriate to include a drawing in a cover letter. Otherwise, it's inappropriate. Your sample drawings may indeed be artistic. But to some eyes, they certainly look immature (or perhaps even childish). That'...


60

No, I wouldn't mention it, as it's nothing to be proud of. You may as well put a post-it on your back that reads, "Kick Me!", like kids on a playground. Given the wrong supervision, you're going to get run into the ground. As the other responses have mentioned, it's a symptom of a lot of poor planning. But it's also a symptom of poor boundaries on your ...


53

As a hiring senior manager I would suggest not to use them. It's a definite no-no for any kind of corporate environment, and I'd suggest that although they may be accepted in a smaller company or startup, I'd still avoid using them. Your cover letter is your sales pitch to the company, and it's like the cool software company where everyone rides fixies and ...


42

In a cover letter: "During my time at XYZ Corporation (formerly ABC, Inc)..." In a resume: SuperAwesomeWorker, XYZ Corporation (formerly ABC, Inc), 2008 - 2010 I wouldn't worry about going too far down the list of entries on your resume to correct names of companies, unless it will cause confusion when people attempt to verify employment and find all the ...


32

I really want to get across that I am looking for a company/position that is ready to innovate and has a forward thinking 21st century vision planned that needs someone to initiate it. (me hopefully!) Your method of choosing such companies is clearly suspect. Three jobs in two years either means you don't know how to choose the right company, or you can'...


30

It is definitely not appropriate and is more likely to hinder your chances at getting an interview than to help you with constructive feedback. The reason is you are indicating to them that other employers have found something lacking. This sends them on a hunt to find the problems rather than looking to see how you can fill their position. And since you ...


28

I have done this once or twice (the second time they had a position but they didn't know what they really wanted, so I shaped it). The key for me was to point out their need first and my skills second. If your approach sounds too much like "give me a job that you don't list" they'll probably punt, but if you can hook them with an insight about a need that ...


28

I was in this situation once (though it wasn't due to relocation). The key points you need to bring out in your cover letter are that you left due to circumstances having nothing to do with the company and that you enjoyed working there and are eager to return now that you can. Something like: I previously held this position at $company and was able to (...


27

Most NDAs forbid disclosing details about the project or work that you've performed, or otherwise exposing proprietary information. Even though some may try, they can not prevent you from discussing your work in broad terms. For example if you developed a web service API for the government under security restrictions and an NDA you couldn't (and shouldn't) ...


27

the president said something like "the money is not most important thing, so we just pay just so the workers would not go to other companies" Did he really say this? I'd steer clear from that company. So was considering to add this in the cover letter Don't do this. You're authorizing them to pay you peanuts. FYI, compensating crunch hours and learning ...


21

The point of a cover letter is to explain to the employer how your skills and experience would be a good fit for the particular position the employer is looking to fill. If you are meeting someone in person, striking up a conversation, and handing them a resume, that conversation takes the place of a cover letter. You're better off in that case not handing ...


21

As per the comments: I was offered the interview after I sent the cover letter Honestly, they would see this a thousand times. If you have been offered an interview subsequent to sending the cover letter, then they've seen it and ignored it. I suggest you not worry about it further and try to do your best in the interview. If, for some reason, they ...


20

You need to remember what the drawings are for. Yes, a picture can be worth a thousand words, but it can also add nothing. A Venn diagram may communicate something, though not much added value, yet there is no added value at all in drawing a picture of a python after saying you can code. If anything it's confusing.


19

I'm not sure I would. The resume is all about piquing interest in you and convincing them they have to meet you. It's sad to say, but honestly, a lot of companies would simply bypass your resume if they saw you have a condition that might cause them any sort of inconvenience. It's after they get to meet you and realize you're competent and know your ...


18

If the language is a requirement, then it not showing up in your cover letter / CV at all would be a negative. The way you have phrased it - that you can pick it up quickly, is (in my eyes) a bonus. You should make a point of R being a statistical programming language - this helps show that you are familiar with the domain as well. In short - if you don't ...


18

Simply state in your cover letter that you got your degree in robotics and leave it at that. If you got your degree from a good school with a decent academic average, I expect that you'll have to beat off prospective employers with a stick :) Having said that: @FionaTaylorGorringe comments "don't ever be negative in the cover letter, emphasize what you DO ...


17

So what can I do with this info? Very little. I suppose it would be useful to tell at a glance how compatible your skills and experience are to a given position but that's something you could just as easily and more accurately determine by reading the job posting. If your profile is complete and detailed and if the job posting is accurate and detailed then ...


16

I would probably write a paragraph or 2 in Swedish explaining that I am bilingual and can read and write Swedish fluently. This will cover your concern about the company believing that you can not read or write in Swedish but allow you to shine in your native tongue. Alternatively you could write the same letter in both languages. I would probably get ...


16

"To whom it may concern" is always fine. "To the Hiring Department" "Dear Sir or Madam" - a bit archaic but legitimate. It really doesn't matter as long as the cover letter is: correct spelling and grammar describing the job opportunity you are looking for in your own words describing why you are a good fit expressing a general enthusiasm for doing the ...


16

I hate to cut you short, but employers care far more about "I am attaching my resume in response to your recent announcement that you are looking for a [state the name of the position that's open and that you are applying for]" than for philosophizing/platitudes like "Learning is a lifelong process" Do yourself a favor and keep your focus on the employer ...


15

That's a typical entry level job. My daughter trained as a chef and the people in the restaurants where she works who do the job you've described often have not finished high school. They don't have previous experience doing that work, or sometimes any work. The employer will be evaluating you mostly on things like attitude and fit for the culture. Or ...


15

Couldn't you specify that you want a company with a more mature development methodology and that you're curious to see how mature is the development process at this company? That does answer the question in the sense of stating what technical components you want to know and if the person is technical they may answer that they use "Agile" and have done so ...


15

I've received some emails with cover letter-like content, but no attached cover letter. When you ask for a "cover letter" then what you're asking for is an introduction for the candidate, which gives you some hint to their personality, motivation, and general suitability for the position. Why care how it was sent, as long as it is easily readable? I have ...


14

Essentially, put the cover letter itself in the body -- this introduces you and lets them know why they are getting the email. It is ok to add it as an attachment as well, which makes it easier for them to save it, print it, or file it however they need to. (I would mention in the email that you are attaching the cover letter for this purpose.)


14

Its obvious that you don't want this letter to be up from your tone and comments. Before we go into legal hashmash (which is off topic here), lets explore some other options to get what you want (the letter removed). Your first step would be to contact the company that put the letter up, if you can see who did it. Outline your concerns to them and ...


14

I have found a few on-line application sites that only allow resume uploads. Should I add a cover letter as first page of my resume? No. If the website doesn't provide a way to upload cover letters, then that means they don't want one. And if the first page of your document is a cover letter, then it's possible that the reader may just discard your ...


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