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I would address and answer the criteria questions as they have asked for. I t hink 1500 words is alot. However, you don't need to write a lengthy answer. Try to be succinct and get to the point. Here's some help: Dear Hiring Manager, Please accept my resume for the position of (whatever) for XYZ company. I believe my background and skills are a good match ...


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They are giving you a list of items they want you to discuss in the cover letter. So make sure you do that. They are also expecting you to be able to craft some additional items around those requirements. So do include some pleasantries, so include additional information that may point out other key items related to why you should move on to the next phase ...


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My opinion is that 1500 words are too much for a cover letter. I try to keep to one page, two if I really have to. It's nice to have the stock pleasantries 'I am very motivated etc...' But if space is limited I would just say 'Wow, what a great opportunity!" and leave it like that. As far as addressing their selection criteria, less is more, be succinct....


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The resume/CV should be tailored for each job you are applying for. Sometimes an application requires you to list every job you ever had, but the CV/resume is a document you write to highlight your experiences, skills, and achievements. You are tying to list either general experience or specific experience that would apply to the job you are seeking. I'm ...


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Should I be mentioning these things Yes, absolutely. Your resume describes you: your skills, experiences and achievements. That's "one-size-fits" all and is the same for all application. The cover letter is unique to each application. It explains why are you good fit for the job and why is the job a good fit for you Demonstrates that you have ...


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Some of the things on your resume are more relevant than others. Typically you have the same resume for several different jobs, but a different cover letter for each. So in one letter you might call out a degree you hold, knowing that the job ad mentioned that degree was required. In another, you might not mention the degree, but might have several sentences ...


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Is it preferred that I list the selection criteria as separate headings and respond directly to each Yes. Make this as structured and as easy to read as possible. Often a table works great. In many cases the first person to read your resume is an HR staffer, who may have very little knowledge about the job and the field. They may have to scan dozens of ...


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Your application might be scored based on the criteria. This is more likely to happen in a large public organisation in "the west". If you think this is plausible then you should answer the criteria under separate headings. This makes it easier to score and significantly less likely that the reader will skim over a key detail that contributes to one of the ...


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I don't see why, if three specific jobs in a company require security clearances and citizen status, that that also will be the case for all jobs in that company. However if you for some reason think that that is indeed the case and you don't want to go to two or three job interviews only to be rejected by your permanent resident status in the end, then ...


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In writing a generic cover letter, should I mention that I am only a PR and not a citizen, given that their website makes no mention of this? You should not bother applying. In the USA almost all of the security clearance related to jobs is limited to citizens only and you will be wasting everyone's time by applying as you cannot obtain the papers ...


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