288

Stay out of it You should not have even brought this up with your manager. If it turns out Joe is not leaving, and he simply had perhaps some (possibly embarrassing to him) doctor's appointments, you may have done irreparable damage to his career. His managers might shift responsibilities away from him due to the belief that he is leaving, or may simply ...


190

The short answer: No, you should not tell your boss that his work was worthless. Instead, express that it's not what you need. My rationale is that worthless is emotionally charged, maximally judgmental, and very much subjectively based. Worthless implies that there is literally zero underlying value to the way your boss arranged the information, and ...


135

Deadlines are always met and the customer is very happy This is what matters. I know you want to feel like you know your teams strengths and weaknesses as a manager since that's your job, to manage the resources at your disposal however if everything is working out and your team is getting the job done, I would just leave it the way it is. The only ...


79

You should talk to your boss and ask him to call you in every time such a revert is contemplated. Your boss is busy but if he can take time to listen to him, he can take time to listen to you. If these reversions keep happening again and again unchallenged, his perception of your competence will be colored and you may very well get to hear some unpleasant ...


79

Your boss worked over the weekend with the intent to help. Unfortunately, his work does not fulfill all the project requirements. Be grateful for his willingness to help, but be clear about how his work does not suit the project requirements. I would send the boss a quick email stating precisely which which requirements are not fulfilled. This will keep the ...


61

Vietnhi Phuvan's answer is great but I think there is something to do first: Talk to the colleague. So you say your colleague has worked on this project for years, but then you commit something he doesn't agree with. Maybe he hasn't seen it before but then that's the issue. It's very likely that he has a better knowledge of the product and the code base. ...


57

Use a privacy screen. I also CoWork (I am a contract programmer and can work offsite or from home but prefer to work in the CoWorking space environment). I often work from the oddest places (Cafe's, by the beach in Thailand, you name it I have probably done it) and while the whole CoWorking experience is great it does have its downsides like you mentioned (...


51

By your own admission, your manager is already aware and shares your concern. I would simply leave it at that. The reality is that regardless of how valuable he is, there's probably nothing that they can do. If he chooses to leave, they can't really stop him. So let's look at the positives and negatives: Positives Management is even more aware than right ...


51

Talking with a co-worker who feels it appropriate to use mind-altering substances at work will, most likely, result in being ignored (at best), and, when the conversation has no impact and you take it up the chain, they will know exactly who took issue with their behavior. Unless I wasn't confident that my manager would handle the situation, I would discuss ...


45

I feel I don’t know who works for me, who works on which feature/bug/task and which are the roles and expertise of the member of the team Here are two things. One is that you don't know your team. This can be solved by simply asking them to meet. In Corpo linguo we call that "team building". Don't force, ask them to participate. Second things is that you ...


44

I'm presuming that this is a problem for you because you are unable to complete your tasks because your colleague is unreliable. In that case you should report only the business impact "I was expecting MJ to complete the setup by 2 but it wasn't done until 4:20" There is no need for you to speculate on the cause of your colleague's poor performance. Let her ...


42

You were told confidential information about a co-worker's bonus, and then went to management and repeated that same confidential information. Which, for all we know, has doomed Joe even if he wasn't already being shown the door, because exchanging salaries and bonuses is normally a very bad thing. At this point, you've already shown your manager that you ...


32

The behavior you are describing is called "Phatic" talk, and it performs an important social function. Phatic talk is the reason people greet each other in hallways, and ask coworkers things like, "how was your weekend?" or "did you get your car fixed?" It's purpose is not to actually convey important information, instead it is a purely social interaction in ...


30

Are you having weekly one-on-ones with your direct reports? If not, you should be doing that. Even though it might be done via phone or skype, it is still a meeting, and you'll still start to get to know them better. My boss is in another state, and while I do visit at least once a year, I've found that having a one-on-one has helped me get to know him a ...


28

My question is: Should I raise my concerns that Joe could be leaving to my managers? Should I go to Bob again? Should I go to George? Should I talk to Joe directly? Short answers: No, no, no and no. Long answers: Should I raise my concerns that Joe could be leaving to my managers? You have a relationship with the company, where you provide expertise ...


27

Be honest, friendly, and direct. What you've said in your question is a good start: At the beginning you didn't have any objection, but as time has gone on you've realized it does affect you negatively. It's entirely possible that your co-worker has no idea you're bothered by his vaping, since you initially indicated it wasn't a problem. So I wouldn't be ...


24

There are several distinct aspects to this; For whatever reason, the company knowingly stiffed Joe on a bonus he deserved. Bob perpetrated this, and George approved it. Dishonest culture. Most us of have seen this go down. [update: you say this was an isolated incident and the culture is good.] All this hierarchical nonsense about saying "Bob knows he ...


24

Seriously, the action you should have taken the first time was to laugh. keep this in mind for the future. You really need to expand your definition of professional beyond never say or do anything except work. It is harming your career. Thinking of them as behaving unprofessionally is counterproductive and wrong. Most of the best workplaces have a lot of ...


23

If there is a reason for sharing it, then I see no reason not to. Unless he is a very uptight sort of person he knows code evolves to meet needs and shouldn't be insulted.


23

Short of slapping one of these guys what can I do? Find a more private co-working space. Your current place might offer cubicles or private offices. It might be worth a few extra bucks to move to that. Or they may permit you to bring in portable privacy screens. If not, find a new co-working space with more private arrangements. If privacy is important ...


20

You should go over the requirements, point by point. Highly emphasize the things he did that helped, and downplay the things that did not. Give him an opportunity to save face by writing them off as misunderstanding's and miscommunications. Then, go over what needs to be done, and show him. He did what most people wouldn't which is jump in to help, and ...


18

What you have done. You have done damage to the person possibly quitting, and you have done utter damage to your own reputation. You have done damage to the company, too, considering the wasted work time, and probably there is more damage to come to the company. More of a sidenote: If the company is ethical and interested in a good team spirit, you might ...


18

By far the preferred option is: Reply to his email, with the comment that he has perhaps sent it to you instead of his intended recipient, as that is almost certainly what has happened.


16

If he is that open about it, chances are management already knows about it and is giving him enough rope to hang himself or doesn't care. I see no need for you to get involved unless there is a safety issue. Ask yourself what you would achieve by doing so apart from making an enemy and making your other coworkers reluctant to say anything to you. I once ...


16

If he reduced to work to be done from 12 hours to 10 hours, and he did that in 1.5 hours, it's certainly not worthless. In fact, it's more than you could have done in 1.5 hours. 10 hours of work seems to be too trivial to make a fuss about. I suggest you thank your boss for his work, and spend the 10 hours fixing "the loose ends". Document in the ticket (...


14

In your list of options, you have omitted the most obvious one: Speak to them directly. While their behavior of pranks and jokes may suggest that they are also not "true professionals", this is not necessarily the case. Do they behave this way among themselves directed at each other as well? In many office cultures this is a sign of camaraderie so long as it ...


14

I don't think it's your job/place to confront this person. I would sit down with your manager and inform him of this person's behavior. Him and the HR department will take it from there.


14

Just nicely ask him in the following way: "I added some features for myself, and I wonder if it makes sense to merge them with your version. I want to avoid keeping my own duplicate version of the code around forever, and I also have doubts about my code at some points; maybe we can discuss how difficult it would be to merge these features". I am a senior ...


14

I don't think you need to do anything at all. But if I were in this situation, I would suggest a policy change that for any rewrites or redesigns, where possible the original author of the code should be consulted about the issue prior to work beginning and a mandatory reviewer of the finished code. The normal rationale for this policy is that the original ...


12

It really isn't your place to say anything. What do you hope to gain by saying something to your boss? If your co-worker is already on the path to a new position with a different company it doesn't seem like there's much you can do to stop them. And if you aren't that close anyway, why would you want to? Regardless of how close you are, I'd start with ...


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