77

Two issues. Your taxes and quitting. ...it's been more than 5 months of overtime money that has not been paid and there are no benefits whatsoever, sometimes the salary can be late. [...] And I did not sign any contract when I was told that I was a permanent employee, only verbal statements and congratulations. If you are in the United ...


50

In this case, feel absolutely free Loyalty demands a certain amount of reciprocity, i.e. the employer must treat you reasonably. Being overworked, having lousy project management (getting that far behind is the evidence of that), not getting paid for overtime, sometimes not getting paid until late, and being unable to sleep all each individually qualify as ...


38

may I resign in the middle of this project? The answer to this question is always "Yes" There is never a good time to resign, it will always be an inconvenience of one kind or another. However, that inconvenience is not your problem; your problem is that your employment arrangement is no longer convenient for you. The project status is your employer's ...


13

I was working in a workplace where my boss was bullying me and it was extremely stressful...how do you deal with it after it has become a thing of the past? I have been there myself, and it just really does take time to heal. You've only been gone two months, so feelings are still pretty recent. It helps to be in a new place, but for a while you will still ...


9

I was signed off work about 5 months ago In the UK health system, if you are signed off (i.e. your doctor has ticked the box saying you are not fit for work), you should be revisiting your doctor so they can sign you back on (i.e. the line will say you are fit for work as of the stated date). Here is the doctor's line: The doctor will likely have crossed ...


8

This is a tough situation to be in. I experienced almost the exact same feelings you describe. Life is more than just working. And working in a high-pressure environment like you described does not help the slightest. When I explained my situation to my doctor, he told me it where early signs of a burnout or depression. I think you should seek help if you ...


7

I originally wrote a comment but felt myself wanting to add more coming from the perspective of someone who has had the same thoughts as your coworker and lives with mental illnesses. I think he may be depressed I wouldn't begin to assume your intern is actually depressed until he starts to exhibit more related signs. The situation doesn't seem terribly ...


4

I've been where you are. Five years or so into my first job out of university, I found myself the sole developer on several simultaneous projects. I was working insane hours far beyond my (out of date) contract in order to try and keep on top of everything, I was stressed and suffering from anxiety in a big way, I wasn't getting overtime pay or even any ...


4

I would leave as soon as you have secured a new job. It is a really bad sign that they pay you late and haven't given you a written contract. And if you were promised paid overtime and they haven't paid that either, that too is really bad. Things are likely to get worse, so leave as soon as you can. Your employer needs to do more to retain you than rely ...


4

You are not alone There are many people going through depression this time of the year, especially on high demanding C-Level jobs. Maybe see what they do to get this over. Demand more from the the team Obviously - if you are protecting them too much or you are not harsh enough (but not too much) - you likely are taking a lot of their responsibilities. E.g....


4

If you are truly willing to leave anyway, then there's actually fairly little to be lost by having a frank, closed door discussion in which you say that you need some personal time, first as a general request and if necessary with increasing insistence and detail until you are understood. While this would be on on the border of ordinary norms of continued ...


3

Firstly, in a work place it is not your responsibility to support people, or enhance their moods or care for their well-being, mental or otherwise. There are medical professionals available to assist with these problems. You are both there to do a job and, from your post, it doesn't sound like his work output is suffering as a result from this perceived ...


2

As your employer has indicated that there there are no part-time options available to you and you feel that a full-time return to work may be too much for you at the moment you should look into Employment and Support Allowance and Universal Credit which you may be eligible to claim. Do this before your SSP runs out, I think it lasts for 28 weeks if I recall ...


2

I was in a similar situation with a job from which I was let go about 18 months ago. At the beginning, I felt exactly how you described (mostly mad at myself for not leaving earlier, lots of anger at my former manager, resentment towards the organization as a whole). As @mcknz answer's says, with time, those feelings begin to fade. I'd be lying if I said ...


2

You are not responsible for your coworker's happiness Some 24-year-olds can still be emotionally immature, and he may already be seeking help for it. I am not sure If I can discuss this with anyone. I would keep the comments to myself as they are not threats, and were likely said in confidence. I should be worried about him or just let it go and ...


2

Other answers have addressed the issues with no written contract, back pay being owed, etc., and I have no expertise in that area. I would like to add a point of view related to the work: You could potentially leave your company and continue working on the project as a contractor, and this might flip the power dynamic completely. You mention a "client" ...


1

If you are in a country with decent employment laws then the next time your salary is late, walk straight out the door, don't look back, hire a lawyer to get your wages out of the company, plus the lawyers fee ofcause and pass any emails or letters you receive from the company directly to the lawyer.


1

Well, I understand that depression is serious. But if he isn't like this when you guys are doing serious work, then I would accept that it's his quirk. As long as he is performing well that's what's important. You could also try to: Lighten the mood : when he says "What's the point of living" respond with "Well, it's so that we get to watch Detective ...


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