706

You are already a real developer. I'm guessing that your boss is belittling you in order to keep your morale down, so that you're less likely to look for another job or ask for a better salary. Five years of experience is more than enough to consider yourself a qualified developer. Given that your current role is not going well, and you have an emotionally ...


348

What can I do to fix this situation? Nothing, you've only been there a few months, it's not your role and you don't have the power to do anything except whine about it. Your superiors have a lot of recourses, but haven't used them in 7 years, so at this point you're just second guessing their reasons and analysing a colleague instead of concentrating on ...


310

A lot of good advice here but I'll add my 2 cents Never negotiate the Price, Negotiate the Features Time is your currency and your budget is low. Here's a sample script (manager goes first): - I want it now - OK. What are the features? - A, B and C. - In that timeframe I can only do one. Which one is the most important? - A smart guy like you ...


283

As a developer these are things I hate: Requesting software/resources taking forever and needing loads of forms etc. Stupid requirements that are contradictory to other features or tecnically not possible due to existing functionality. Unreasonable and arbitrary/pulled out of thin air deadlines being set. Not knowing the priority of my work. So, if you ...


256

I think you're asking the wrong question. I'm going to go ahead and say that challenge was probably designed for you to fail it: You've been given a really impromptu test, which is kind of weird outside of an interview setting. I've never heard of it happening like that before. If my manager suddenly did that, I'd stare blankly at him and ask what the heck ...


253

The company would be well aware of this issue and I would imagine unless they say something you shouldn't either. It is clearly not a management issue so don't make it one. On a side note, a few minutes is nothing. My code can take up to 40 minutes to compile and around 10 minutes to fire up the backends to run a regression test. Usually it's more like ...


228

Management needs to set measurable goals. They then need to confirm the developer is hitting those goals. If not, they need to take action. If you are facing issues related to this and are not this employee's manager, focus on the velocity problems when you talk with your boss. If you are the manager you need to be more clear on expectations. For the ...


210

Let's start here: I've realized that I've gotten myself in this situation because I always give in when she asks for immediate help Exactly. Now you have to get yourself out. As an old boss of mine used to say "If you do it once, it becomes your job". Here's a new word for you to learn. no You need to start sending this person through the proper ...


197

Then, when I go to source code to know where the problem is, I usually find out that he was who wrote that specific piece of code (thanks to git commit history), but as it is not immediate, I cannot defend myself. Two approaches here. If the policy is "whoever caused the bug fixes it", then you just push back: I've investigated this issue, but it seems ...


190

You can trust Parkinson's Law (work expands so as to fill the time available for its completion) to provide more work for you. You don't know what that work might be, but if your bosses see you as competent, capable and trust worthy, you have nothing to worry about. If you can automate the mundane stuff, that just frees you up to do more interesting things....


188

Hire two or three of the smartest developers that you can find. Hand them all the code. Let them verify that they do indeed have all the code, everything that is needed to run the software. Have them learn what the code does, document it, refactor it, until they reach the point where they can fix problems faster than Mr. A. All this obviously without any ...


180

Based off your information on this question I assume this question is also linked with this question. The way your manager has sprung this test on you is completely unfair and clearly an attempt to prove that you are not able to work here when realistically the time restraint was likely too short and the notice was non-existent. The way he approached you ...


139

Short Answer: Your organisation currently is in grave danger of The Bus Factor. This is why you never let one person hold all the knowledge. It is a huge risk. What would happen if this person decided to quit, or literally got hit by a bus? If the situation is as you outline it, then the whole company is gone. You need to flag this to your managers as ...


128

As an old school developer myself who uses text editors and the CLI, I can say that forcing someone to use different tools will not necessarily increase speed. That said, if you're the team lead, it is generally unwise to micromanage down to the level of demanding he use certain tools over others. Either he is doing his job or he is not. If he is, leave ...


120

Yes, you should be concerned. It looks as if they have not thought things through (enough). It is in their interest to provide you with a machine: The main reason is that there can be no (future) arguments about who is responsible for what. They can always claim it is company property that you must take good care of. That includes: You have to handle it ...


120

You already are a developer. There is a meme doing the rounds on LinkedIn at the moment which is worth quoting here: Your value does not decrease by somebody else's failure to see your worth Developers are in huge demand. There have been recent articles stating that developers are more important to companies than gaining access to capital - and that ...


117

Should I count this waiting time when I report my hours or should I exclude it? Yes, it's time you have to utilise for the job, so include it.


103

If you ask, you may not be offered the job. But if you don't ask, you definitely won't be offered the job. Ask your supervisor, and tell them why you're concerned.


97

You should immediately go back to the job search. You mentioned your concerns once, and they described your progress as "slow" and didn't offer any extra help. There is no way that this ends well in the long run. Find something somewhere else with a better support structure.


94

The other answers are pretty great, but there's one additional thing I'd consider: My personal advice would be to consider starting to look for other places to work... if management hasn't taken any action in 7 years, I'm not sure this is a place you'd like to work for in the long term. To me, this reads as a warning sign for other sorts of problems in the ...


90

There is nothing to be lost by asking your supervisor. Be forthright, "I was posting the jobs to the web site, and this one looks a lot like what I am doing. Is this something that I can apply for or were you considering me for another position in the company?" Frame it as a positive and stay enthusiastic.


89

It's completely normal to feel lost as a new job the first month It sounds like you're doing the right thing Waiting, studying in this free time, and looking for be busy Keep studying. You will get better. A few things I do when I start a new job/project 1) Spend personal time reading a book on their technology stack 2) Volunteer for grunt work that ...


88

The top-voted answer here is very good. However, I think that there is another option worth considering - the issue isn't really the assistance; it's the immediacy. You stated that you do not mind helping her. As such, if you must, you can agree to assist this coworker in troubleshooting issues. You must learn, however, to defer the immediacy. For example, ...


85

How to address decline in productivity right before vacation? Short Answer: Suck it up, buttercup. To have a decline in productivity between long stretches with no break is normal. My advise to you going forward would be to take more frequent breaks, even if they are shorter ones like a 4 day weekend. Taking regular breaks off from work is very ...


83

Generally, using personal resources for a company project is not a good idea and should be avoided. For good reason, companies tend to have policies and security restrictions about resources and your personal resources may not adhere to these standards and even if they do, they are outside the control and support of your company's IT personnel. In some ...


79

You should talk to your boss and ask him to call you in every time such a revert is contemplated. Your boss is busy but if he can take time to listen to him, he can take time to listen to you. If these reversions keep happening again and again unchallenged, his perception of your competence will be colored and you may very well get to hear some unpleasant ...


72

Can my next employer find out? Yes they might. Paperwork required between parties might give them the end-date of your last employment. But there is nothing to gain here for your future employer, so the probability is high that they will not spend a split-second on even trying. And paperwork is handled by HR, you are asking about your future boss, they will ...


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