New answers tagged

2

After that the line manager started being passive-aggressive and then when there was an opening for a better position, the line manager promoted someone else instead of the employee that deserved it. If the manager has actually selected somebody that is unqualified for the position in question, then it's only a matter of time, before a manager position will ...


9

Realistically, no, it's not a legal issue. Promoting someone that the manager likes over someone that is somehow objectively more qualified is perfectly legal unless some protected characteristic is involved. It is generally poor business practice to promote unqualified candidates and it can demotivate other employees but it isn't illegal. There may be ...


1

Biggest thing is that it's unclear what terms your colleague made. It could be a temporary thing or the company must keep him on board for a project then can let him go. As such, I wouldn't use him as an example as you may say something that they know is untrue and call your bluff on it. I'd just say you have to relocate to your home country because your ...


8

There's no harm in asking. Don't bring the example of the "other person" in the equation: make it about you. You need to relocate, ask if the organization has provisions to help you or not. I'd not advise to insist, have an open minded discussion, let them know of your requirement and whether they are willing to help you to continue working for them. Given ...


2

This is an excellent topic to bring up during the group session. That would be the best thing to do and since it's aligned with the group idea of bringing issues to the forefront for discussion would not be out of place or make you look like an ass. Instead you would come across as an earnest and thoughtful contributor.


-2

To start with: I admire your principles. I believe you are absolutely correct from an empirical point of view. Now let's address the world how it is: The whole MeToo movement has, rightly or wrongly, sent a very cold chill through the corporate world to men and there is a very real, and quite valid concern that being in any sort of 1:1 context regularly ...


2

There are some good answers here already, regarding how you might approach the situation. However, in my experience, mixed groups in this kind of scenario will quickly be dominated by men. Many women feel less comfortable asking questions and participating in general when in mixed company. It is not uncommon for men to interrupt women, or 'mansplain' ...


13

My advice would be tread very carefully on this. First because it's a hot button issue, but also because you seem to have got some misunderstandings about discrimination. You claim that having a Women's Support Group is sexist and discriminatory, but you offer no evidence to back it up. A selective support group is not discriminatory if it is seeking to ...


11

Simply ask her to open it up Your goals seem to be fairly aligned with what you can imagine the VPs goals were (to improve inclusivity, and equality in the workplace). It seems that the sticking point for you, is more on implementation rather than any fundamental ideological difference (which would have been more dangerous). At our office, we've got a ...


0

This is a double standard that you're just going to have to deal with, like any other affirmative action. Trying to protest it will just get you labelled misogynist. Simply put, according to many forms of left-wing political thought, certain groups are historically disadvantaged and to counter-act that, they should be given special advantages that members ...


3

Although I like the answer by Sourav Gosh it does not adress you problems with the women's support group itself. As I (now, thats why its edited) understand you do not see the neccesity of a Women support group. Do you know to the full extend how your peers feel about it? Maybe it is different in other departments? It might be rather different than what you ...


1

What is your goal? Do you think you can stop the VP from starting her group? That's very doubtful. Do you want to be invited to these meetings? I really doubt that. It's not like you will be in charge of its agenda or its speakers. And participating in its regular meetings may annoy you even more than you currently are. Do you want to create a man's ...


2

but I'm unsure how to address such a hot-button issue without coming across as an ass. By minding your own business or starting your own support group.


4

Initially I considered approaching the VP of HR directly... Bad idea. ... but I'd prefer to stay off her radar for various reasons. Very good idea. I've also pondered writing a short "memo" requesting that we be more inclusive, and submitting it to her anonymously. Not so good idea either. My goal is first to encourage inclusivism... Not bad. ...


51

First of all, understand and convey this: You have no objection with the setup, you're just not happy about the male co-workers missing out a chance to learn and grow. You don't need to necessarily fight the decision, you can also take the alternate route. If you're not OK with going to the VP of HR directly (which you need not anyways), you can have a chat ...


Top 50 recent answers are included