211

One of the big problems with "hello"-only messages is the inadvertent delay you get in getting to the point - there's a delay between the response to "hello" and another delay to the follow-up. Worse yet, the recipient of a "hello" will waste some time after sending their response waiting for the follow-up, if it is not ...


130

An interview is a two way street. They checked you out. You checked them out. It seems their normal day to day operations is doing their jobs in environments full of distractions. I would not want to work there. You probably don't want that either. Good thing you had this interview, so you can put that application away and focus on the other ones. It might ...


107

If you're using a chat client that supports message reactions (e.g. Slack), a "thumbs up" or similar reaction to a "Thank you" message might be a solution: you're being polite by acknowledging your colleague's gratitude but in a non-distracting way.


53

I have been to a lot of job interviews in my life. Sometimes the interviewers said weird things during the interview, and sometimes the interviewers had not read my CV beforehand. However, never was I denied the common courtesy of being interviewed in a quiet room with only me and the interviewers present. To deny you such a thing, I think, is just flat out ...


18

The problem with "hello" messages is: It tells me to expect a message after "hello", so now I'm sitting for possibly minutes waiting for you to type out your followup message instead of doing whatever it was I was doing before. My time is being wasted waiting for you to tell me the thing you wanted to tell me instead of you just ...


18

Having an interview in an unusual setting is not necessarily a bad thing. I landed one of my most fulfilling jobs through an interview ad-lib conducted in public. I was scheduled for a job interview at a school in a foreign country. Travel arrangements were made. At my arrival and due to unforeseen circumstances, the headmaster was unable to conduct the ...


17

I want to be polite, but I also don't want to send messages that contain no useful information. But "You're welcome" does contain information. It contains social information! The information is that your help was given freely and with good will. As others say, it also closes the conversation in a polite way so that no-one is left hanging.


12

What I do is to only say "you are welcome" within one minute of receiving a thank you, when I can assume that the other person is not context switching to read my message. If I miss that window I let it be. Failing that, reactions in Slack as mentioned by Egor are very good, but your messaging platform may not support them.


12

I had for 10 years at the top of my profile, "I do not respond to 'hello'. If you want me for something, tell me what it is." After a productive exchange, "You're welcome" is perfectly acceptable, even if it is 'just noise', it's 'friendly' noise & provides closure. It's the equivalent of saying 'goodbye' on the phone. Only in ...


11

I find it hard to believe that your manager doesn't know what the word plausible means. I suspect that when he was asking you "what does plausible mean?" that what he was really asking is "what does plausible mean to you?". Like maybe he asked "can this be done?" and, instead of answering with a "yes or a "no" you ...


7

Does this reflect badly on the company or individual? Bad here is entirely subjective; that's rather the crux of the issue. You seem to be approaching this from the angle of I didn't like aspects of how they conducted this interview. Should I have expected them to explain or apologise for these aspects? Consider another angle: The interview accurately ...


6

You should develop your ability to set boundaries. You describe a lot of problems, all of which can be solved with a simple "sorry, I'm busy" or "sorry, I won't be able to help you". Incompetent people who will try to make their tasks yours are omnipresent. Similarly, people going about their lives and not noticing the listeners aren't ...


4

There are a few possibilities here. Other people have mentioned the possibility of ADHD. I would also like to mention the possibility of an anxiety disorder (which can cause you to feel "paralyzed" in the face of starting a task) or depression (which can cause you to have low motivation and energy in general). I recommend seeing a good medical ...


3

Stop and fully consider what we are discussing about here: Is replying you're welcome in a chat acceptable? Yes, it is acceptable, it conveys your politeness and kindness. I mean, the colleague would notice a new chat notification, stop whatever they are doing and check the chat just to see "you're welcome". Is your colleague so important and ...


2

There's certainly phycological possibilities (ADHD, Depression, Anxiety, etc). Certainly, all the changes to normalcy and near relentless repetition in life those changes have created due to COVID have messed up a bunch of us. Back in the day, if I needed to focus and do work, I would take my laptop or tablet to Starbucks and I'd be super productive. As we ...


1

IMHO, this may be a symptom of a larger problem. Be true to yourself and see if this behavior pattern affects more than just your professional life. if yes, you may need a doctor, some illnesses affect concentration and can be hard to pinpoint. If not - this may be a symptom of burnout - and that is not good to be left untreated. Good luck and keep us posted ...


1

I think your safe exit from this situation is to make clear to your manager that, while you agree that asking to you saves time for him, the time that you put in coaching him is time you cannot dedicate to other tasks related to your job. Preferably in written form. If he is fine with that, your back is covered: you are doing what he asks, and he cannot ...


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