276

I know how you feel; I came from a rural and traditional background as well and went through this several years ago. Here are a few things I wish someone had told me: These women are not dressing this way to distract you on purpose. Women dress the way they do for a variety of reasons, none of which have anything to do with you. You will become ...


210

Any company with a dress code of business attire generally wants to signal professionalism, conscientiousness, high standards, even conformity. Some people will fit in with this corporate culture and some people won't. But there are two kinds of companies that have a casual dress code. The first kind wants to signal that what you wear is literally ...


198

As in intern, you should follow the advice of your direct Manager. It doesn't hurt to clarify the situation. Their answer is likely to lead you to dress to the prevailing norms or better. Meaning, while jeans and a t-shirt are common, you stick with jeans and a polo. You don't want to be over dressed, despite the technical rules. That gives the ...


162

As an Indian woman working in MNC, I can quite understand your problem. Let's face it. In our country, when a man earns, people think that is because he needs to feed his family, he is ambitious/passionate. But when it is a woman, people assume she simply wants to pass time till she gets married, to earn for her apparels or just because everyone else is ...


132

I'm not skinny, and I still dislike a lot short-sleeves tee-shirts, and I can easily understand what you feel. I don't like people staring at my arms, and some tattoo from shoulder to elbow. I love my tattoo, they're very nice, but private, I don't want to share them outside of the very close friends and family ring, and never outside. What I did, as a ...


131

I think that not participating might cause your reports to wonder: if (boss) is still in business dress, does that mean I should too? Dressing in jeans will definitely make them more comfortable in doing so.


130

The previous answers are very optimistic. However, the truth is the answer to your question depends a lot on: the country you are in, the state of your skin, the industry and your role. Normally, the safest option in terms of your career is for your look to correspond to other women's looks in the industry and country you work in. You can try not to ...


128

Yes, it is appropriate to ask about the company culture, which encompasses dress code. You should ask whatever you need to ask to ensure a fit. If it doesn't come up naturally in the interview process -- for example, it's part of the spiel I give about the company at the beginning of an interview, but that's just me -- then in the "do you have any ...


127

I've not experienced a problem like this myself, but the fact the asker is trying to stop and finding it difficult does remind me of a surprising but well-established finding in psychology that the harder you try consciously to not to think about something, the more you end up thinking about it and the bigger a deal it becomes. I think this is part of the ...


115

This is probably going to be my shortest answer ever given. You do you. Make your own rotation whatever feels comfortable. And if someone starts playing around like they're looking for your "real" clothes, let them know that it's not appropriate and push their hand away.


109

How should I ask if changing my hair color is acceptable? I would review your employee handbook first, and if there isn't anything that addresses the topic, then I would definitely run it by your manager. If your position is not customer facing, then I don't see the issue at all with your choice in hair color. If you do have a customer facing position, ...


106

they do mandate that male employees all have short haircuts and female employees have at least shoulder long hair. At least in the cultural context of Germany (or most other European countries), that seems way over the line. I work in Germany, too, and I have never heard of such a dresscode - not even in directly customer-facing roles (such as sales or ...


97

Personally, I believe that overdressing is never an issue. Wearing a suit may be overkill if the position has already been offered, but perhaps khaki slacks and a button-up shirt would be ideal. No need for the full suit and tie treatment, but formal enough to continue a good impression and appear professional. Growing up as the son of an HR Director, he ...


87

I think Alison has a good answer for this, from a person who was interested in moving into management: If they were fresh scars, indicating that it was ongoing, I think that would be on people’s minds, and their concern for you would probably get in the way of being able to see you in a management role. But they’re older scars, so I really wouldn’t worry ...


86

I'm going to run counter to the answer so far that say "if in doubt, wear a suit". I agree with the referenced quote - developers typically do not wear suits, they wear upscale business casual - slacks, khakis, sweaters, polo shirts, button down shirts or similar (and female equivalents). Rarely in the last 10 years have I interviewed a technical ...


82

I'm a senior technical architect, female (and umm, not in my early twenties any more), and I really only wear makeup if I'm going into meetings with our larger clients where I need to be more formal. Day to day, I just don't wear it. It costs a bomb and looks crappy by the end of the day unless you spend significant amounts of time either preparing ...


78

In the absence of a formal dress code, you look to what your colleagues are wearing to determine what the informal dress code is. In this case, you seems to be in a workplace with a mixed dress code: fully casual for the rank and file and presumably business casual or even formal business wear for (upper) management. While I can throw out all sorts of trite ...


74

These things are super delicate. If you wish to do something about it, you have to make sure to not call them out in front of other people. But you knew that already. So ideally you have a one on one. It helps, actually, that you have the same body type. That might make the advice easier to deliver. I’m a chunky fellow myself. If it were me I would be ...


72

If you're only going in to sign the contract, you've won the war already. Your employer won't change their mind about hiring you at the last minute just because you show up dressed like everyone else rather than in a suit. You're fine.


67

Simply wear the t-shirt over a long-sleeved shirt. As long as the colours match, no one will think twice of it. There is no need to have a (potentially awkward) conversation with your manager about this. If someone does mention it simply reply "I'm cold" or "I don't like short sleeves". Again, there is no need to offer an explanation or mention your "body ...


66

In the end I almost felt like a petulant child with how I was being treated. Let's imagine it from the new bosses perspective, just given what you've said. I can imagine her writing a question here something like: I was giving a meeting to a new team where she introduced a policy. In the middle of the meeting, one of my new employees effectively said, "I'm ...


60

Don't worry about it. In a small company like this, there is a lot of room for dress variations. Nobody is ever going to grumble at you for looking a bit dressed-up. Worst case, take the blazer off in the office, and you're in shirt and slacks. No big deal.


56

Whether and how you wear it should depend on the situation. High-stakes business trip to Saudi Arabia? I'd say no. Working with your peers (who know you anyway) in the home office? Probably doesn't make a difference. Instead of trying to make a global yes/no decision, consider the circumstances. I, too, am Jewish but not obviously so (I'm Italian), and ...


53

I am an embedded software developer and always wear a suit (through choice). For "dress down Friday", I eschew a tie and tell everyone that I feel as if I am walking around naked. People accept that it's just "my thing". My boss's "thing" is sci-fi T-shirts. The guy at the next desk collects tattoos and piercings. You are going to be "different" in some ...


52

In my experience, it still absolutely depends on where you are interviewing. Here's some generally-applicable advice: Err on the side of over-dressing. The worst reaction you'll get is a "Make sure not to wear that tie to work!" joke. Usually, no harm done for overdressing. If it's a technical position for a financial firm or similar, wear a suit or at a ...


52

The reality is that long hair ranks alongside visible tattoos, scruffy clothes, piercings and any number of other fashion choices (ie. points of appearance that are very much within your control). In all these cases, I have never seen a study which shows a correlation between fashion choices and professionalism. In my personal experience, I have also never ...


51

Some people keep additional emergency clothes in their offices for just such occasions. These are generally people who have to deal with clients inthe course of the day and not just their regular co-workers. If you are a guy, sometimes just having a spare tie is all you need. There are also stain remover sticks that you can keep in your desk. These can be ...


51

As an intern you adhere to the rules. Don't worry about what others are doing. If you look more professional than them that's a bonus, not a liability.


49

There are a few things to keep in mind. Wear formal dress. Even if they won't see you completely, you will act differently while wearing formal attire vs casual attire. Make sure you are facing the webcam. If it's not centered on your computer (perhaps you have two monitors) arrange things such that you are looking at the camera and interviewer. Verify ...


46

Clothes should fit: I would think you have a case there. You just need to keep pushing. If you're a new employee quite often employers are reluctant to go to any extra expense for you at first but, after a while, there shouldn't be a problem. When I was a forestry worker we were not allowed to alter the gear either. This was because the gear would go to ...


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