Hot answers tagged

130

While I also think your mails are reasonable, I'd like to provide a different perspective: You are telling them that they failed to reply. While true that might be considered rude, no one likes accusations. Instead of emphasizing that they didn't complete their task, I'd simply ask for an update on the issue. This is less accusatory. Something along the ...


100

Is it rude? The question you should really be asking here is, is it allowed? The answer is : No. I am unsure whether this would be a misuse of our working email (actually, I have never received such kind of emails from any colleague, or none I can remember). Yes, it will be considered a misuse. Do not use official resource for any unofficial / non-...


72

Don't do this. The problem isn't really that it's not work related - as you say innocuous non-business use already happens on a smaller scale and is generally accepted, or at the very least tacitly ignored. That's not what this is though - this is mass mailing staff (many of whom you don't even know) on the organisation's e-mail platform about something ...


49

Your emails were fine. The responses were unprofessional. The only thing I see is you might want to change 'will' to 'would', but that's a personal preference and has no bearing on your question.


34

Messages which can be perceived as political should not be sent to your colleagues. They have built in that there is consensus on some subjects where there may be none. People with other views will see it as if there is a company-wide policy on those subjects. Would you find it acceptable if another colleague would send round a link to a report about the ...


32

I apologize for emailing again, but I have not received a reply to my email beneath. I will appreciate hearing from you. Please let me know if you require more time. Sorry. I have not heard from you to my email beneath. Your reply will be greatly appreciated These both look to me like you are politely instructing the other party to do something. They're ...


20

I think your attempt to be polite is doing more harm than good. I'd recommend being more succinct, which can both be professional and polite. Thank you very much for getting back to me. I'd greatly enjoy working at your company, and I'm sure I'd be a valuable asset. However, I'm currently only considering offers with an annual salary of at least XXX,...


15

SPAM is actually never acceptable, regardless of whether it is sent to acquaintences in your job, or acquaintences elswhere. So, you should not send any of your proposed SPAM regarding politics, to your coworkers or to anyone else by email whom you do not know well.


10

You asked, I am wondering if I can do something "perfect" for the future The best thing to do is probably take a step back and confirm if "A" is the best official source you have. If you are having enough trouble with your work that you need to constantly rely on asking someone else questions, you may want to check in with your boss and let them know. ...


10

As a golden rule, inter-company communication should not show a hint of remonstrance. Your emails are absolutely polite, but they both contain what's essentially a: You did not respond to my last email on my expected schedule. Most people will ignore this, but some will not. Depending on the urgency of the matter, I would modify your emails to one of ...


9

In addition to the issues the other answers raised regarding the wisdom of bringing politics up in a 'work' channel there is another issue. Generally if you are supposed to be able to mail the entire organisation there will be a distribution list for that. Sometimes these exist but are restricted to authorised users only to cut down on spam. Sticking a ...


8

As a counter to the other answers, I'll say that this will vary by location, but is somewhat more likely to be acceptable at an academic institution. For example: At my university it has been a long-standing policy and practice that political and organizational information is communicated by university email. It's been pretty much a daily occurrence in the ...


6

Info about a global strike? Potentially work-related, but only in the context that delays/difficulty getting into work might be a thing. Beyond that it's a bad idea. Don't send political stuff through work emails. People open their work mailbox to deal with work queries, not to hear about political stuff. This can easily be construed as a violation of ...


6

The issue may not be with your followup email. It might be with the original email. If you want to get a response then make sure you politely let them know that you are looking for a response, and that you will follow up to receive confirmation or an answer. This lets them know their obligation, and that they can expect another request if they delay. If ...


5

I'll chime in with another way of looking at this: Hi everyone, This is Bob Bobson in Department XYZ. I just wanted to let you know that the 'Asians are Ruining This Country' rally is starting at 6 PM tonight in front of the Confucius Temple. Hope to see you all there! Cordially, Bob Bobson ... does it seem wrong for Bob to be using his ...


4

You're overthinking this - and focusing on the wrong aspect of the cover letter. There is no magic opening line or phrase that's going to get you the job, people are generally looking to hire someone who can do the job not someone who writes a gimmicky cover letter after mainlining a thesaurus. Concentrate on making sure that your cover letter and CV/...


4

While it's clear that you meant only to be polite and effective, it seems to me that there are some subtle issues with the emails you sent that could cause someone to respond negatively. Critique I apologize for emailing again ... This seems a little odd. If it is your job or natural action to email again, then apologizing is a claim that your action is ...


4

Your specific question is "Do you think I can send the email or not?" That is not the most important question you should be asking. Misuse arises both from official policy and recipient reactions, and the latter will "inform" the former. I do not know what views you hold. However, consider: Some people, perhaps many, would consider that: Your views on ...


3

Sending a group mail about non-work-related topics on an official work/academics group address isn't going to help your cause in any way. What most people will probably do is skim the mail, see that it's nonwork related and delete it as spam. If you're unlucky, they remember your name and will from then on handle your other mails (even official ones!) with ...


3

I wouldn't respond as strongly as your counter-party did but you can easily remove two things from your email to make it sound more polite appreciate hearing from you. While you say you appreciate, mostly I have seen this phrase being used when the other person really has no other option (So the "appreciation" may sound basically like an order). ...


2

Another reason for never sending unsolicited emails is that your email may be viewed as a security incident. At my university, a student sent a mass email to 80K people to remind everyone to vote for them in the student elections the next day. The email only took seconds to send but the investigation lasted a year.


2

We all need to negotiate now and then in our life, and not all of us (probably, most of us) don't do well when put on the spot. Some preparation strategies that may help: Prepare for questions Try to anticipate what the other party will say or ask, and what your answer should be. Decide beforehand what you want, and what would be minimally acceptable What ...


2

You should be careful with email when negotiating anything contractual. An email can be just as binding as a signed contract. Sending a "thank you" note expressing your appreciation for the counterparty's time and consideration is certainly appropriate, but be careful not to include any details of what was negotiated. As an aside, here are a few things to ...


2

No, don't do it, and yes, it's rude. It's bigger than just email, and it's bigger than a question of company policies. send an email to all the colleagues ... to raise their attention about the topics. You're talking about sending them information that they have not asked for. You have no reason to think that anyone will welcome the information. In ...


2

As I've been on the receiving end of this.... I'd really recommend you stop going by that person's desk unsolicited for these questions. I'd even go so far as to say.... Don't send a skype asking if you can call, or asking if you can stop by their desk on short notice. The polite thing would be to schedule a meeting with a reasonable notice period, or ask ...


2

It's better to hear a single thank you than many sorrys. Do not say sorry, say thank you.


2

Your letter is fine. I like it because it is succinct and talks about why you deserve more. Its actionable, if they offer you between X and Y you will take the job. However, I am confused: and now I decided to join them and they made me a better offer but still low for such a big change. How can you negotiate an offer you already accepted? Its too ...


1

I wouldn't say apologise - but always thank them for their help and, every now and then, go a little further to show your appreciation. (Something like "I appreciate you taking the time to help me with that"). It's natural that you will need time to learn the business, the product, the process etc. It's important however, that you aren't asking the same ...


1

Depends on the culture. For example lets compare Germany and USA. Germans are known for efficiency and getting straight to the point. Your example is quite the normal here. You need update, you ask for it. There is nothing rude in requesting information on something job related. Everything else around the question that doesn't directly contribute to the ...


1

Is this good enough to use for professional emails? I know you said this is a different company - but it still heavily, heavily depends on the context. I've sent similar emails to this to bump existing support requests that aren't answered or resolved within the contractual time - that's fine, as you're (rightly) requesting an update on something that ...


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