New answers tagged

-1

If I were in your shoes, I would try to be a lot less blunt and a little more personal, no matter who is being addressed. Hi, X. How is Project Y coming along? You can also give your reason for asking for a status update: Hi, X. What stage are we at with Project Y? I need something to feed back to Person Z If you are asking about a delayed project: ...


1

You should ask for status update in such a way that it shouldn't sound impolite to the receiving person irrespective of whether they are a fellow employee, manager or client. This is how I usually deal with it. Hi Jay, Did you get a chance to try out the solution for the above error? Please let me know in case of any queries with the solution ...


0

Does this risk being too formal? The risk isn't so much that you'll come across as too formal. Using reasonable formality is generally always the safer bet when communicating in the workplace. The risk is that this is unreasonable formality. The formality in itself isn't the problem - it's that you're using it inappropriately and excessively, and it's ...


1

If there's a pattern with the other people invited - they're managers (and you're not), they're department heads (and you're not), they're from specific parts of the organisation (and you're not) - there's no need to feel hurt by this. You could even reframe it. Your boss made a list of the people she wanted to invite - people she regarded as important - ...


2

The use and contents of a signature block has lately been directed by corporate policy. The company I work for has specified that the signature block appear in both new messages and replies. They have dictated the information they want us to include in our signature block. Other than corporate policy there is no standard. Some never include a signature ...


3

Yes, it is perfectly acceptable to drop the longer signature and use a shortened version to sign off. Something like: -- Haridas Pal Engineer, Company That -- I use is to indicate to the compatible email server / clients to identify that the remaining part is a signature, so if there is a capability to hide the signature part (even the shortened ...


4

I would definitely suggest dropping them after the first email from a given participant. In fact, many email clients and even some mail servers have automatic features to do just that. Email chains can get rather long, regardless of whether they are "formal" or not. Once you have a signature in the thread their job is done. After that they are noisy and ...


8

It's a bad idea. It would cause confusion. There are two identities: your personal one, and your work one. These should be kept separate. If you start sending emails like this and somebody notices that the signature doesn't match the email domain, it will damage both your reputation and your company. I would myself take this as impersonating somebody else ...


13

You can, but I wouldn't advise it, for the following reason. Every last email you send with that information reflects on the company In other words, if you compose an email that offends someone, and it gets back to your employer, you are out of luck. It is far too much of a risk to use in anything other than professional correspondence.


34

You may not be being petty Are you a manager? If you are, you have a problem. You did not say whether or not you were a manager, but if you are and you were not invited to this, then you are clearly not one of the team members designated to be professionally developed. You should be examining your career options as you are evidently not one of the valued ...


2

I feel ashamed to be so petty but it really hurts. I am sorry you feel this way. I understand that receiving an invitation and then it being withdrawn can feel uncomfortable. Now, the professional course of action I suggest is that you let it go, and move on. Your boss already excused herself and said it was a mistake; that should be sufficient excuse for ...


18

How can I ask him formally and politely to delete the received email? You can reply to the email keeping only the unintended recipient as the receiver and convey your request in a formal and polite tone. Dear Sir/Madam, The email last sent to you in this thread contains sensitive company information which is not intended to be received by anyone ...


2

You can simply ask whoever you think is most likely to know about the new person: Ms. A, I noticed we have a new person working in the lab, but they haven’t been introduced around. Could you do it? Or maybe you could send out an email letting everyone know who they are, who they’re working with, etc. Now, all that said: most academic labs and workplaces ...


2

What is the professional way to do it? I think it's fine to send an email to the team as you mentioned (personally, I would use more formal phrasing, and avoid using things like "y'all"). Alternatively, if possible, when everybody is gathered in the lab you could introduce the new member in person to the team as whole (or to the ones present), in case you ...


1

Even if you already expressed yourself verbally, the email serves two purposes. 1) The CC list of people are all notified of what you said, and who else knows that you said it. So it is also an easy way of making sure everyone knows who knows. 2) The written email creates a written document of what you said that can be referred back to at any time by ...


18

You should still respond with your answer. To avoid the "awkwardness", you can add: As we discussed earlier, … or Per our earlier discussion, …


58

In this case, because there are other people in the email conversation, you should still reply-all so everyone is up to speed. Even where it's just a one-on-one, I will often write emails anyway. Something like: Just to put our discussion in writing: This is [What we've agreed / what we're doing / what I need from you by [deadline]] etc. This is ...


26

It depends: What kind of question is it? "hey who wants to go for lunch?" is a different question from "hey could you bop the fizz for Bigclient?" does this conversation need your express consent or does it just need a lack of opposition? If it is the latter you can avoid emails, if the former then a paper trail is nice for everyone involved. Does it ...


100

What to do? Follow the process. There was an email, requiring an email response. Send it. The fact that you met them in person is not really relevant here. There are two reasons why you should still send the email response: If for any reason, the reference of the answers are needed after 6 months down the line (or even after 6 hours), the email will still ...


-1

It sounds like you already have your users emails and permission to send them updates via email. The only other thing you need to be careful about is exposing each recipients email address to other recipients. To send the email, you should use mailing software that allows bulk email. I.e. Loop though all contacts and send the email to each one. Without ...


1

I don't think this is merely an issue of polite phrasing. It is useful to consider what is preventing them from completing the form/paperwork. It could be that they don't understand the text, or perhaps it got lost in the pile of other paperwork. Medical care is a nightmarish complex bureaucracy in most countries and it often hits patients at a very ...


1

Well, if "clients" are people in a professional relationship with her medical office, then sending them what sounds like an ultimatum does indeed sound very rude. (And if the clients were patients, it might be even ruder, because patients are ill people, not in the best of shape physically and often mentally, and that needs to be taken into consideration in ...


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