New answers tagged

2

We all need to negotiate now and then in our life, and not all of us (probably, most of us) don't do well when put on the spot. Some preparation strategies that may help: Prepare for questions Try to anticipate what the other party will say or ask, and what your answer should be. Decide beforehand what you want, and what would be minimally acceptable What ...


0

In a remote work environment it's hard to create bond between employees. There might have been a decision in the company to encourage such behavior in the hopes it improves relationships. It seems to me that your problem isn't that such messages are being sent, but that they are sent in a way that isn't easy to be ignored. If your company would use Slack ...


2

No, don't do it, and yes, it's rude. It's bigger than just email, and it's bigger than a question of company policies. send an email to all the colleagues ... to raise their attention about the topics. You're talking about sending them information that they have not asked for. You have no reason to think that anyone will welcome the information. In ...


1

Depends on the culture. For example lets compare Germany and USA. Germans are known for efficiency and getting straight to the point. Your example is quite the normal here. You need update, you ask for it. There is nothing rude in requesting information on something job related. Everything else around the question that doesn't directly contribute to the ...


1

Is this good enough to use for professional emails? I know you said this is a different company - but it still heavily, heavily depends on the context. I've sent similar emails to this to bump existing support requests that aren't answered or resolved within the contractual time - that's fine, as you're (rightly) requesting an update on something that ...


2

You should be careful with email when negotiating anything contractual. An email can be just as binding as a signed contract. Sending a "thank you" note expressing your appreciation for the counterparty's time and consideration is certainly appropriate, but be careful not to include any details of what was negotiated. As an aside, here are a few things to ...


5

I'll chime in with another way of looking at this: Hi everyone, This is Bob Bobson in Department XYZ. I just wanted to let you know that the 'Asians are Ruining This Country' rally is starting at 6 PM tonight in front of the Confucius Temple. Hope to see you all there! Cordially, Bob Bobson ... does it seem wrong for Bob to be using his ...


1

I am generally in agreement with all of those answers which say, "Don't do this." And, I am generally in agreement with many of the reasons provided by those answers, which basically amount to "this is off-topic", "this is political", etc. Although, an issue close to your heart can seem pretty non-political to you. And, you may see other people do such ...


2

Another reason for never sending unsolicited emails is that your email may be viewed as a security incident. At my university, a student sent a mass email to 80K people to remind everyone to vote for them in the student elections the next day. The email only took seconds to send but the investigation lasted a year.


1

Disregarding the fact that a business communication channel should be used for business-related communication, the general rule of thumb still is: If you feel like you wouldn't be able to tell a person about this in person to their face, then you shouldn't be emailing them about it as well. E-mail creates this illusory veil that you are somehow disconnected ...


1

These guidelines are useful to me in situations such as you describe, and in many others. They may be useful to you. I always try (with the very occasional lapse :-) ). To remember that anything I commit to a traceable non-deniable medium may be shared with person's unknown. (It may happen with untraceable and/or deniable media too, but that's another ...


15

SPAM is actually never acceptable, regardless of whether it is sent to acquaintences in your job, or acquaintences elswhere. So, you should not send any of your proposed SPAM regarding politics, to your coworkers or to anyone else by email whom you do not know well.


4

Your specific question is "Do you think I can send the email or not?" That is not the most important question you should be asking. Misuse arises both from official policy and recipient reactions, and the latter will "inform" the former. I do not know what views you hold. However, consider: Some people, perhaps many, would consider that: Your views on ...


8

As a counter to the other answers, I'll say that this will vary by location, but is somewhat more likely to be acceptable at an academic institution. For example: At my university it has been a long-standing policy and practice that political and organizational information is communicated by university email. It's been pretty much a daily occurrence in the ...


9

In addition to the issues the other answers raised regarding the wisdom of bringing politics up in a 'work' channel there is another issue. Generally if you are supposed to be able to mail the entire organisation there will be a distribution list for that. Sometimes these exist but are restricted to authorised users only to cut down on spam. Sticking a ...


72

Don't do this. The problem isn't really that it's not work related - as you say innocuous non-business use already happens on a smaller scale and is generally accepted, or at the very least tacitly ignored. That's not what this is though - this is mass mailing staff (many of whom you don't even know) on the organisation's e-mail platform about something ...


6

Info about a global strike? Potentially work-related, but only in the context that delays/difficulty getting into work might be a thing. Beyond that it's a bad idea. Don't send political stuff through work emails. People open their work mailbox to deal with work queries, not to hear about political stuff. This can easily be construed as a violation of ...


34

Messages which can be perceived as political should not be sent to your colleagues. They have built in that there is consensus on some subjects where there may be none. People with other views will see it as if there is a company-wide policy on those subjects. Would you find it acceptable if another colleague would send round a link to a report about the ...


3

Sending a group mail about non-work-related topics on an official work/academics group address isn't going to help your cause in any way. What most people will probably do is skim the mail, see that it's nonwork related and delete it as spam. If you're unlucky, they remember your name and will from then on handle your other mails (even official ones!) with ...


100

Is it rude? The question you should really be asking here is, is it allowed? The answer is : No. I am unsure whether this would be a misuse of our working email (actually, I have never received such kind of emails from any colleague, or none I can remember). Yes, it will be considered a misuse. Do not use official resource for any unofficial / non-...


4

You're overthinking this - and focusing on the wrong aspect of the cover letter. There is no magic opening line or phrase that's going to get you the job, people are generally looking to hire someone who can do the job not someone who writes a gimmicky cover letter after mainlining a thesaurus. Concentrate on making sure that your cover letter and CV/...


0

You've got a few things going on that could contribute to bad reactions. That said, the responses you got were a little extreme. Both formulations are obviously "boiler plate" - a standard text that you use and reuse constantly. Your "boiler plate" is awkward - something that gets used constantly should be carefully formulated with proper grammar and ...


0

I'm surprised this isn't in somebody else's answer already. I prefer something like the following: Dear Counterparty, I understand you're very busy. I just wanted to bump this in your inbox so I can update my status on this issue. And optionally: I'd like to get a response by the 3rd. If you need more time, please let me know. Thanks, ...


0

I would say that your follow-up email (in both versions) is not rude or impolite in any way. The approach that I use for my follow-up emails is the following: Dear x, Did you get a chance to look over my previous email? This way you're not accusing them of not replying to your previous email and you make it sound like it's a possibility that they ...


0

The content of your messages by themselves are fine. However, these two sentences stand out to me: I will appreciate hearing from you. And this one: Your reply will be greatly appreciated. From my perspective, they're fine, since I can understand your intent, which is purely getting in touch. However, depending on cultural differences, it can ...


4

While it's clear that you meant only to be polite and effective, it seems to me that there are some subtle issues with the emails you sent that could cause someone to respond negatively. Critique I apologize for emailing again ... This seems a little odd. If it is your job or natural action to email again, then apologizing is a claim that your action is ...


10

As a golden rule, inter-company communication should not show a hint of remonstrance. Your emails are absolutely polite, but they both contain what's essentially a: You did not respond to my last email on my expected schedule. Most people will ignore this, but some will not. Depending on the urgency of the matter, I would modify your emails to one of ...


32

I apologize for emailing again, but I have not received a reply to my email beneath. I will appreciate hearing from you. Please let me know if you require more time. Sorry. I have not heard from you to my email beneath. Your reply will be greatly appreciated These both look to me like you are politely instructing the other party to do something. They're ...


6

The issue may not be with your followup email. It might be with the original email. If you want to get a response then make sure you politely let them know that you are looking for a response, and that you will follow up to receive confirmation or an answer. This lets them know their obligation, and that they can expect another request if they delay. If ...


1

Personally to me, the email content looks fine, it needs no change. I send emails along the same lines multiple times a day, till time never got a negative response. Maybe it's a cultural thing, but from a professional communication standpoint, I don't see any rudeness / impoliteness in this. However, since you're receiving negative response for that email, ...


3

I wouldn't respond as strongly as your counter-party did but you can easily remove two things from your email to make it sound more polite appreciate hearing from you. While you say you appreciate, mostly I have seen this phrase being used when the other person really has no other option (So the "appreciation" may sound basically like an order). ...


130

While I also think your mails are reasonable, I'd like to provide a different perspective: You are telling them that they failed to reply. While true that might be considered rude, no one likes accusations. Instead of emphasizing that they didn't complete their task, I'd simply ask for an update on the issue. This is less accusatory. Something along the ...


49

Your emails were fine. The responses were unprofessional. The only thing I see is you might want to change 'will' to 'would', but that's a personal preference and has no bearing on your question.


0

Should I respond to the feelers I'm not interested in? Or should I just ghost/ignore them? If these were "out of the blue" messages (essentially recruiter spam), then I'd just advise ignoring them. Life's too short to give random recruiters the time of day that start spamming me on LinkedIn. But in this situation specifically, this isn't recruiter spam - ...


2

Should I respond to the feelers I'm not interested in? Yes. Think of them as people. If they took the effort to send you an email, so that they could help you, an answer (with a thank you note) is the minimum you can do. If I should respond, how can I say I'm not interested without burning a bridge or coming off like a jerk? What makes you reject/not ...


-1

I’m always willing to talk assuming the job is something I might plausibly be interested in (from their perspective). At worst, I get to keep my interview skills fresh. I ignore the spammers who send me help desk jobs or Geek Squad type repair things. Whatever makes something think I want to trade a software engineering job for $11 an hour repairing ...


7

Should I respond to the feelers I'm not interested in? Or should I just ghost/ignore them? If I should respond, how can I say I'm not interested without burning a bridge or coming off like a jerk? You never know who can help you some time down the road. Assuming the feelers were online, it's simple and quick to respond in a friendly, non-jerk way. No ...


0

Some more thoughts on that. A call is quicker to explain something than writing an email. Some people might prefer that. But a call is immediate. It tears you out of whatever you do and you have to switch into a different subject at once, then try to find back to your own. Your colleague could see an advantage in email for this reason. Explain it that way ...


1

I agree partly with what Richard say but partly only. First pointing the fact that OP was in CC and not in TO is expecting that every mail and every recipient are carefully choosen. Reality is that it is not, people will just say that you are nipticking and such remarks aren't really productive. As for taking any blame, it would be very specific to each ...


3

There is space to clarify procedures and improve from it (leave the need for justice, specially finding the one to blame, aside). I would expose, objectively, the situation, more specifically, the decision points and the decision taken, in order to discuss how that situation should be handled from that moment onward. When doing that, start with the ...


1

Here are some queues I think that is imporant in handling chain emails based on my experience: If you're on the same Department of the person being TOed in the email, though it's not directly addressed to you it is everyone's responsibilty in that department to keep track of the email specially if it's from client. For instance, in my previous work, as a ...


1

No, do not go back to the boss. It's not productive. Think about it this way: The customer wants the problem solved. It matters much less who solves it as long as it is solved. The boss likely wants you and Jake to solve the problem without having to involve her. From her perspective, again, it matters much less who solves the problem as long as it is ...


4

First, discuss it with this colleague, although you might prefer email, he might prefer calling. So discuss what is a good way to communicate. If it is really blocking your work and you cant work it out with your colleague you should go to your boss. Tell that it is blocking you, that you are sure that your colleague is really busy but that all the ...


5

How can I get my colleague to answer my questions in a timely manner, with a paper trail? You cannot, unless helping you by sharing information is part of their responsibility. In other words: If you're looking for additional help / guidance because of your colleague's knowledge, then you are requesting for help and you cannot demand it. You have to ...


2

The email was addressed to Jake, so he is responsible for handling it. So it was not up to you to reply to that email. You are responsible for support, so you're responsible for making sure support calls are handled in time. It was up to you to ensure Jake took action on that email, e.g. by delegating the request to you. Therefore, you share the ...


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