515

Work your contractually obligated two hours and leave. You aren’t a slave.


431

You just ignore that sort of thing and eventually your colleague goes to bug someone else. Don't feed him and don't let it impact your morale; it's not important.


367

You're not in the army, in prison or at school - you can tell whoever you like. What are they going to do if you do ?


361

In a situation where you're asked to do something uncanny, like be silent about getting laid off, it might be helpful to reflect on why they're asking you to do that. Instead of just obeying and then resenting it, consider their point of view and then use your own discretion to do what you feel is right. As you know lay-offs are an enormously stressful ...


302

Professionally, I'm a sysadmin. The bane of my life is users who won't take security seriously, those who treat it as a joke, as your colleague does. Many years ago, I used to have an Oracle DBA who took pride in having a one-character password on all the systems he had access to - and on the Oracle account, to boot. It made me weep tears of blood, trying ...


285

Don't do it. Not by giving access, not by screen sharing, not even by describing what is inside (like what security algorithms). Your job as software developer is to create safe and secure environment for your customer (here: current employer). Not only such action violates the basics of the good code of conduct, but you will almost certainly be ...


270

The most effective way is to tell them you charge X per hour for answering questions, and they need to give you an address where to send invoices. Having to explain your bill will stop most people from asking questions.


268

Whether or not the company shuts down is not your problem. It's not your company. Focus purely on what is best for you. If you're not getting basic rights and pay, then you should have been job hunting for a while already.


261

When threatened with dismissal, the first step is to consult a lawyer. After you did this, follow the advice given. Most likely it will include talking to your seniors about the fact that they gave you an impossible task. Either way, start looking for a new job. A company that you need a lawyer to not get fired is not a company you want to work at.


255

You're approaching this with a waterfall mindset: First she learns everything she needs to know, and then applies it to your in-house stuff. The thing is waterfall doesn't work. You don't know what you need to know until you're doing it, and by guessing at the start you can waste a LOT of time and money, which you're seeing now. Instead, consider assigning ...


248

First things first, you have my condolences. Appropriateness of actions always depends on context, and in this case, the context is the death of a family member. I would say, in general, you should ask. But in this particular instance, no. Life events, particularly death, are serious events; attending a funeral is a gesture of your respect to the deceased ...


244

Is there anything I can do to simply tell them to bug off? Just stop answering their questions. Nothing says "bug off" quite like not giving answers to repeated questions. You've trained them to continue to rely on you for help. This is your fault. Time to un-train them. You don't need to answer the phone if they call. If you do answer, just brush it off ...


236

Can I or my supervisor do something to change this behavior? The CEO can pretty much do whatever they want, the smaller the company the more arbitrary they can be. My strategy to mitigate against this sort of issue was pretty simple. If I was given a change of task directly from the CEO, I would email my supervisor outlining it, and stating where it came ...


226

Well I hate to burst your bubble but if this is the third time this happened that almost rules out "it's not you, it's them". Your title says that you were fired for being "indispensable" but apart from that being an oxymoron, it's also not what happened. You were fired for writing code that your colleagues can't understand, which is a critical performance ...


224

First of all, thank you, personally (1), for stepping up and making the right decision. We need more engineers human beings like you. I am completely on board with your assessment and current decision to fight the scam. Go ahead. One kind suggestion: Please ensure you have double backup (backup for the backup) of the required data/information to prove the ...


218

In some locations, it is a crime to provide certain types of false information to a potential employer. If this is the case where you are, or you are not sure, you should consider Eric Lippert's Answer. Otherwise read on: Side note: they are very professional. You should own up to the the lie, apologise, be honest about the reasons why you lied, indicate ...


213

First, change your attitude. It is not that you cannot complete the task, it is that you lack the knowledge and expertise. The difference? If you say "I can't do it" to your employer, you may as well pack your things, because you are DONE. If you say "I don't have the knowledge or expertise" then management can address that by either upskilling you or by ...


206

I write apps and make intranet sites. I have several apps that give surveys, tests, and quizzes to close to 100k employees. My apps log SSO information and IP address. So if your company has some sort of SSO (anything that you log into) you can pass those variables over to the survey. Also no matter how anonymous you think something is they have your ...


200

Is it okay for my family to intervene in my career, workplace or professional life? No. Never. As a working professional, you and you alone are responsible for managing your interactions with your employer, manager(s) and colleagues. Your parents or any other family member, including spouses, have no role at all to play there. A parent who "intervenes" on ...


200

You do this by presenting the thought process that led you to this conclusion - not the conclusion alone. This gives the team, or the individual, a chance to offer their perspective regarding your concerns. You might find that there are viable solutions to the problems you anticipate, which you did not think about. Ask prompting questions that highlight ...


198

The symptom here is that you get calls outside the working time. The issue however is that your boss isn't getting the level of updates he wants on what you've done/are going to be doing. So I won't touch on ways to avoid his call. The answer therefore is simple, make sure you leave your boss with an update (email, or verbally if you see him) before you ...


194

She will however not actively seek out discussions and talk to people about the issues they are facing Who on earth would? She strongly believes people need to come to her. And she's right. No domain expert will spend his time walking up to colleagues to listen to their grievances or looking for stuff to do. It would be an outrageous waste of their ...


189

Is it true that I do not have much of a choice or did I overlook some possibility? Besides the basic stuff, such as carpooling, providing extra time off, or paying them additional money for their travel time and associated costs, there isn't much else you can do now. Down the road, once you have established yourself with your client, and they come to ...


181

At my previous company, the well-liked co-founder and CEO died suddenly on a Sunday. On Monday morning there was a company-wide meeting to share the news (it wasn't already in the news like yours was), and anybody who wanted to go home did, no questions asked. On Tuesday the company was closed for the funeral; many but not all employees attended (and it ...


176

I'll address the elephant in the room here: You have a trainee. And you refuse to train her. Instead you sent her to please train herself and come back when done. That's not going to work. If that would work, she'd be master-nobel-prize-winning-chief-of-whatever-you-do before she even started at your company, because there really is no shortage of "...


173

Get everything in writing The client wants you to do a job that is substantially different than what's in your employment contract. They want you to do it under unusual and technically-challenging conditions. These conditions are possibly unethical (for the managers) and carry significant potential risk for you (mostly reputational, possibly legal). It ...


170

Yes, you have been wronged. You can quantify exactly how much you were wronged (in the short run): three days' lost wages. Politely ask for back pay and whatever documentation is necessary to show any future inquiry that you were not at fault. If you really have a normal, professional relationship with this director, then you will get back pay, and an ...


169

"Great! As long as I'm fairly compensated and challenged to learn and grow, I don't see any reason to change jobs!" Obviously you are pretty sure you won't be fairly compensated and challenged to learn and grow for long, but that's on them. This is true and stated very positively, so threads the line between lying ("Of course, it's my life goal to die in ...


166

You've done everything right. I've been in a similar situation as an IT professional. Asked for time off well in advance with the request confirmed and approved by management. I even reminded them a few days before hand with an all clear. Day comes and goes, management pitches a toddler style fit that I was gone. I'm not sure why some people are like ...


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