New answers tagged

4

You have an offer for a new job. If that offer is better than your old job, then figure out what your notice period is, and accept the offer. With that done, you have the choice: a. Go to your old company and give notice. b. Go to your old company and ask for payment for these three days. If they don’t pay you give notice. If they pay, you put the money in ...


2

Short answer: You can fight, and probably win compensation for the time lost, but it may not be worth it. Longer answer: In all practical terms, it will likely cost you more to fight for it. Ask politely for the money, as the suspension was not justified. If you get it, great, if not, I recommend you just move on to the new job you've accepted. The ...


30

If he didn't offer you compensation, you do not have a normal professional relationship. You have been cheated of three days of pay. Your company evidently is not careful about making accusations if they can badly pull a report and not be bothered to check that they generated it correctly before they put you on suspension. That is a bad sign. Apologies are ...


53

Yes, you have been wronged. You can quantify exactly how much you were wronged (in the short run): three days' lost wages. Politely ask for back pay and whatever documentation is necessary to show any future inquiry that you were not at fault. If you really have a normal, professional relationship with this director, then you will get back pay, and an ...


5

You should ask for compensation for that unwarranted suspension period. Placing someone on unpaid suspension for a suspected error may or may not be legal or allowed by your contract or local employment laws. If they choose not to pay you, you may want to contact an employment lawyer to see if they are required to pay you. Regardless of if they pay you or ...


8

I believe you overestimate the ability of your boss to arbitrarily end your contact. Under normal circumstances it might look like he is able to, but even then he is going to have to justify to his own bosses why he is firing a competent worker. If circumstances were normal he could probably make something up to justify it which would be accepted. But in the ...


1

"Confidentiality" in the workplace doesn't mean anything unless it is defined in a contract such as an NDA or has the backing of a law to enforce it. In this particular instance, HR may have a policy that such investigations are confidential and you'll be punished for revealing the nature of such discussions, but that doesn't mean much if you risk being ...


2

Reading the site referenced by the OP under "What kind of staff are covered by the rules?" I see: People in generic roles that are same for insurance and non-insurance companies are not covered by the rules. The FCA has listed some examples of these kind of roles, saying: ‘The requirements will not apply to employees in ancillary roles such as HR, ...


2

Yes, this is a legal requirement. You are closely involved in the design of communication channels that customers base financial decisions on. Your employer is obligated to make you complete this training. Given that you're in a more technical role and have little do do with the design of financial products, this may seem like a waste of your time. Consider ...


0

I'm not sure if you're in the U.S.. I would skip the police and go straight to the FBI about this. If your client wants to steal several thousand dollars from one customer, they may be multiplying that with several. The FBI, or similar justice organization where you are, can authorize you to proceed with immunity, the police cannot.


0

While you already have some good answers and I absolutely agree with the advice to talk to a lawyer, I think you have two separate issues that you need to handle independently. One is [...] he owes me money for dozens of hours I poured on one of the features for his software and the other is that he wants you to [...] help him out to conduct this ...


-2

I had such an experience and I know that kind of guys. Most efficient scenario would be like this; Stay away from lawyers as long as you can, until you have safety concerns. It doesn't worth the money, trust me. Act nice to your client, warn him about the consequences of scamming, tell him you will do the job, but you need the full payment of your previous ...


11

I worked as a freelancer for 5-ish years, back when there were half a dozen instead of just one or two highly popular/profitable freelancing sites. Clients like the one described by OP are a dime a dozen. First: Anyone who refuses to pay for work or product to date will never pay you one thin dime. It doesn't matter if it's one milestone or a full ...


19

he already made it clear that he'll refuse to pay me anything if I don't help him out to conduct this scam. I think he might be trying to embark you on a wonderfully escalating trip: Hey, do X for me, or I won't pay you my debt. Now, do Y for me, or I'll tell everyone you did X (even though it'd harm me too; but don't worry, I'll find my way out, thank ...


3

...asked me to do something highly illegal ... ...he already made it clear that he'll refuse to pay me anything if I don't help him out to conduct this scam.. Conclusion: he is a criminal. You have little or no reason to beleive him. He probably does not intend to pay you anyway (and his scammer reflexes will trigger even if he intends to pay in ...


1

Not to pay is a bluff, because you would report him. The work turns out to be illegal, so you want to quit. He owes you money for work already done. He says that he will not pay that if you quit. You have documentation of his illegal behaviour. So he makes a threat to not pay the money. There is a potential threat that you could make, reporting his ...


113

Find a lawyer You've made a great ethical decision by choosing not to help your employer perpetrate their scam. I admire that. But no-one here can tell you the right (and safe) way to continue. We don't know where you are, we aren't familiar with the law in your area, and most importantly we aren't accountable when something we've advised you to do goes ...


43

Is this an adequate way of dealing with this situation? No it isn't. None of these include you getting paid for work already done. I would call his bluff, send him a bill for everything owing and ignore anything that isn't a payment. Short blunt note with it so he knows you're not interested in licking any lollipops. "You currently owe me X dozen hours, ...


22

Warn up the authorities about the scam. While they didn't start scamming no-one yet, I have the paper trail that shows up the intention to do it and the step-by-step of the scamming process. This is the way to go, even if it will make your life uncomfortable for a while. As a consequence, the other two will happen also. The police will probably want to let ...


219

First of all, thank you, personally (1), for stepping up and making the right decision. We need more engineers human beings like you. I am completely on board with your assessment and current decision to fight the scam. Go ahead. One kind suggestion: Please ensure you have double backup (backup for the backup) of the required data/information to prove the ...


0

This can range from completely harmless to very shady. Re-applying knowledge from your education/training resulting in the same product with well-known features and technologies (you are a "person skilled in the art") is no problem. Obviously everything which required a collective work of a team and/or higher qualified persons (e.g. you were the programmer, ...


2

I can't stand extremely sensitive information being sent to a regime I don't personally like. What should I do, if anything, about this? You say that you can't stand it, but so far you have. If the regime bothers you enough, you should find a new job and leave this one. Before you decide to look elsewhere, you might wish to make sure that the ...


6

If it was a data transfer from EU to China, there are rules (https://ec.europa.eu/info/law/law-topic/data-protection/international-dimension-data-protection_en) that need to be followed. I assume that similar rules apply for US to China data transfers, but some legal expertise is required to understand if those data transfers are protected by “Privacy ...


-2

This isn't your issue to resolve. If they're handling sensitive data there are mandated procedures legislated to do it by. And it would be audited regularly. If you don't trust the auditors, your company and the authorities then you should look at moving on. If you have ambitions of crashing your career and other risks including perhaps doing it all for ...


12

Interpreting privacy policies is not trivial, so keep an open mind that you might be wrong. At the same time, don't assume malice immediately - they might be willing to address the situation. First stop should be your immediate manager. Share your concern with this person and see what they say. If you are not satisfied with their answers even after ...


27

It sounds like you have identified that there are two questions for you to answer: Is it legal? Is it ethical? With regards to it being legal, you need to consult a lawyer with your contract from your previous employer in hand. Please don't mistake the comments or answers you've received as valid legal advice. Trade secrets are a protected form of IP, and ...


56

What can I do if they still want to do the project anyway? Obviously you cannot reproduce your former company's product line for line. But there's no reason that you cannot build a new product from scratch which has all the same features as the prior product. That's perfectly legal and happens all the time. And now, with your experience, you can build it ...


1

Is your boss preparing to pay you some obscene amount of money? I'm saying that because your old company is not just you. You had a boss, and probably other colleagues in your team doing other footwork to get the entire system setup. Your boss is now asking you, a single person, to re-create the product of a company. Logically, that isn't going to happen. ...


117

I'm not sure things are quite as cut-and-dried as you make them out. To the point where it's possible to proceed with a modified version of the project without ethical issues. Let me explain with a few examples: "I used to work for a company as an administrator/developer for an Inventory Management System. The new company I'm with want me to ...


8

Is it even legal? It is definitely not ethical to use the business secrets of your previous company while working in the new one. It is perfectly fine to use the general know-how: how to use the programming languages, which tools are better suited for the development (IDE's, debuggers...). About being legal, you need to discuss with a lawyer, because the ...


5

Jerks remain jerks. They just can hide it temporarily There is no reason to think that the employer has fundamentally changed. She has options, why go back to the lousy one? Unless the money is truly superb and thus makes the rest worth it.


35

A wolf remains a wolf, even if he has not eaten your sheep The ex-employer has been abusive, was nasty, and even went so far to tell your friend that finding a replacement would be no problem. You are dealing with a wolf, and you know that. Up until this point, your friend was a victim. Going back to that situation would make your friend a volunteer. ...


13

Should she accept the ex employer's offer regardless of the prior bad experience (financial and emotional stress, being insulted) just for money sake? Or learn from experiences and find a better employer? She recently left she was mistreated a poor contract took her for granted wasn't compensated enough trash talked her stated she could be easily ...


0

I had this store card that would send me a $0.00 sheet with nothing else on it. I'm thinking problem is the computer prints it out and packs the letter. The only human interaction is someone having to pick up the box of envelopes and take it to the mail. So no actual human is really aware or doing it on purpose. I'm thinking a lot of companies waste a lot of ...


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