New answers tagged

-1

I think it’s really hard to give a sane answer on something like this without knowing most of the people and the circumstances in detail. English is not my native tung, but from reading your text I would have most problems if I where in your place with the phrase: “I’m only listening!” I would assume that you - in hindsight - would’ve better answered like: “...


3

How should I handle this? By moving on. Stuff like this happens. Escalating the situation will probably cause more damage to your reputation than leaving it alone. Also note that she is objectively at fault here. You had legitimate reason to be there and acted reasonably. At the same time she grossly misinterpreted your presence, falsely accused you in her ...


3

If I'm not mistaken, you need the relieving letter to start at any new place of employment. The fact is, if the above is stated in your relieving letter it would definitely reflect negatively upon you. Even if you were mentally sick, chances are that local laws protect you from people divulging this information. Your best course of action is to consult a ...


3

Whether I can ask him to respond to my complaints? Don't ask your superior to respond to your complaints - it sounds rude. Instead, request them for any update on your request (doubles up as a reminder, if your request fell through crack). For anything non-critical, something along the line of: "Dear Boss / Manager / Supervisor, Just checking with you ...


0

Besides pointing out that it is the end of the semester and you have exams to prepare for, how about choosing an other event and propose to attend that one instead, as a replacement? Of course, if it is covered by the company training budget. Maybe related to your everyday work, or perhaps to that other technology. This might emphasize your will to learn, ...


6

Keep in mind that being in the classroom giving the lecture is only one part of the job, actually thinking trough what to teach, preparing the materials and exercises, grading exams, etc.. can take up even more time, make sure this work does not creep too much into your regular workdays, otherwise you'll end up dropping balls, and or burning out.


2

While you're getting a lot of good analysis about what has happened to you so far, you specifically asked, How do I interact with this employer moving forward? Since you seem to have some legitimate concerns (compensation, workload, risk of working for a small employer) and your employer also seems to be concerned (their tiny company is at risk of ...


6

How do I interact with this employer moving forward? Graciously say "thank you" the absolute next time you see your boss in person while others are not around. You can even choose to seek him out while they are in their office. You can try something like: Hi Boss, I just wanted to sincerely thank you for recognizing my increased efforts with a ...


4

Yes, you may decline (probably). I'd argue a good boss and company leaves plenty of room for opting out of events. People have lives and should work to live, not live to work. Prior engagements happen all the time, and it isn't the duty of a boss to determine the merit of what you consider more important. I would, however strongly encourage going or re-...


6

Honestly the majority of your reasons for not wanting to attend are not very good. You have a lot of petty complaints and I wouldn't mention any of them if I were you, nor would I let them stop me from attending. Plenty of people have social anxiety, don't feel like traveling, etc. yet do so anyway. As an introvert, I sympathize with you, but simply opting ...


-1

I don't think you can refuse to go. If your employer wants you to go, doing so is part of the work you are assigned to do, so you go. What you can do, and I think you should, is argue against it, provided you do so in a constructive way. What I'd do is ask your boss for a meeting to discuss this, and in the meeting: explain why going is a burden for you, ...


-3

Think twice before jumping ship. If you do, you just let go a bag of money in exchange for another with new risks


-1

You have legitimate reasons for not attending due to your hours, so I would highlight this and point out it is not your preferred learning style. Highlight you are keen to learn the new stack and suggest a learning method that would suit you and explain why. Remember though good software development usually requires 70% talking 30% coding, so its alway worth ...


0

Look at it from the point of view of your boss. He does have pressure to avoid giving you a higher salary. It does not matter where that pressure came from. He could be the owner of the company and actually really know that he simply cannot afford to pay more without going bankrupt. Or, more likely in your case, he got a budget by his superiour, and must ...


30

I agree with @sf02's answer that you should simply and politely decline to attend based on your previous education commitments. However, I'd like to take the chance to point out that - apart from the educational/time constraints - I find your general attitude to the issue rather strange, and I suggest you should have a hard look at it. Your company pays ...


100

How do I politely decline the going to event C, without getting asked (for the second time) why I’m not going, Politely decline and let the company know that you cannot attend because it interferes with your education. This is a perfectly legitimate reason for not attending such an event and anyone who sees it as anything other than an employee trying to ...


38

How do I interact with this employer moving forward? Act like a professional. Continue to do the work that is assigned to you in a timely manner and treat your co-workers as you normally would. Once have accepted a written offer from another company, hand in your resignation and serve your notice period professionally.


92

Sounds like you dealt with it just fine. You asked for more money and got it. Every employer/employee relationship is the same: The employer wants to pay the employee as little as possible and the employee wants to be paid as much as possible as the employer. You simply told them that your current salary was not as little as possible to retain you, and ...


7

If you are working in Germany, and at the same company for ten years, then German law puts facts ahead of contracts. In this case, the FACT that you worked there for ten years would override the CONTRACT that says your employment is for say one year only. You cannot use contracts to change facts in Germany. In practice this means that your notice period and ...


6

People in this thread have given some very good answers so far. If this is a case of micromanagement I would keep a record of when you go on breaks. Keep a small notepad in your pocket and write down the date, the time you left, and the time you returned from any break. Distinguish between a break and when you had to use the restroom so they can't accuse you ...


2

I've had two supervisors sit me down and ask about being absent from the floor A good place to start would be with either your line manager, or these supervisors (I'd talk to my line manager, but you'll have to judge who is the most relevant in your workplace). Tell them that you'd like to fix the issue that's been raised, and ask how you should handle ...


11

The fact that your absence creates the problems (or at least, they claim it to be a "problem") indicates two things: There is no proper communication of the break-time schedule. There is no proper escalation matrix both of which are required (and usually mandatory) in a scenario where a continuous monitoring and management is required and expected. As you ...


0

Based on: running around everywhere trying to find me (melodramatic and unnecessary about something that was not at all urgent and could wait). and that I couldn't be found anywhere It seems like the problem is getting in contact right away rather than the breaks themselves. The complaints centre around getting in contact with you and finding you ...


Top 50 recent answers are included