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156

I think you are right to be concerned. Your employer is asking you to falsify documentation for them that introduces an element of risk on your part and has no potential for anything beneficial for you. Worst case scenario you are held accountable for something you did not realize was a problem or did not even do. While the best case is nothing changes. ...


119

If yes, how can I deny to sign the letter politely? My experience with issues like this is to ignore/forget/lose them as long as possible while I watch what the other staff do. Sometimes there is wholesale rejection and it's withdrawn, sometimes someone gets terminated, sometimes it just goes away. But the longer you can hold out, the more chance you have ...


104

Don't do it! This is a recruiter looking to get you to provide managerial references. You'll never hear from that person again, and they'll be plugging your references for new business. Old scam.


83

The primary (if not only) alternative to US employment law you will have access to is simply a written employment contract, which both the employer and employee sign and thus agree to be bound by. These employment contracts are relatively common at higher-level positions, and are commonly used to define severance packages, minimum notice periods, the time ...


71

Ahh, the old, "I'm the boss, but I want to be your friend" situation. I will tell you to answer your question directly without context, and then try with context. Namely, be the boss and not their friendly coworker. Tell them this is the job you have for them, and that's it. They are paid to do what you say and be done with it. But own up to your ...


51

Yes it is normal practice for meeting a creep. At worst they might ask for pictures and if you like leather or being tied up. At best they are a fishy company with little funding and pay. In the middle they might just be skimming for contacts. Verdict: Don't. Ignore future contact unless you just feel like messing with them with fake info. (you can ...


51

You should carefully assess risks of signing any legal document without running it by a lawyer. (That is to say, what will happen if you sign it without understanding what exactly you are signing.) You run the risk of screwing yourself for a good, long time if you sign something without understanding the risks and weighing them carefully. A good lawyer can ...


46

However straightforward it appears to be, you have nothing at all to gain from signing it. And there is the potential to lose out if you accidentally breach something after signing it. Losing out might be getting sued, or losing the opportunity to apply for a job elsewhere.


35

You don't want to stop her from asking questions, because that's how accidents happen. You said that it helps you in one way and makes you think and that's a good thing and the only problem you have is with energy. If she's getting the job done and you don't always have energy then you can just tell her that you don't have the energy. When you do have the ...


33

If you are used to UK employment law and are about to be employed by a US firm you are entering a very different world. The short summary of your new situation is that of the protections and benefits you are used to virtually none of them will exist. I strongly advise you to get an expert on your side (i.e. one not working for either the US or UK company). ...


32

It's reasonable and insightful for you to hesitate at the back dating of the non-disclosure agreement(NDA). By signing it in its current form, you would be opening yourself up to any of the punitive actions outlined for the entire period. The best way to move forward would be to ask your employer if there is a specific reason for back dating it; it may be ...


32

No, you should not sign. Send back a revised contract in which you mark your changes or ask them to change the contract as follows: remove "and which may be added / or amended from time to time" and replace with "at the time of signing this contract." Should they insist that they want / need to amend their rules ask to include something along the ...


25

One possibility I haven't seen covered is the chance this is an honest mistake. In other words, they grabbed their standard NDA, which was last updated two years ago (it is possible others have signed without checking the date, or didn't care). If you haven't received any word on this front yet, then it might be an option to just say "I have read the NDA ...


25

If there's one thing I've learned, it's that technicians are ignored at my peril. I would go the other way from the other answers and embrace this technician's feedback by formalizing the review process. Add a step to your process called "technician readiness review" where you solicit feedback from all your technicians (not just this one) about whether a ...


21

So they want you to give up a job without the reassurance of future employment. The sensible course of action is to say no. You do have rent to pay etc...


20

I was told 90K and not 99K That's pretty strong evidence that the company was not intentionally being deceitful, but actually did make a mistake. If you verbally accepted the $90k (or was willing to accept the $90k), then it would make sense to chalk this one up to an honest mistake and just move on. You could also offer to "split the difference" and ...


19

Sound weird? What should I answer them? Yes sounds odd, not to mention unprofessional. Good thing you haven't left your current job yet. I suggest you: Reply back to them saying that the contract is already signed and not open for renegotiation. Wait for them to reply, if they insist on renegotiating seems that the best thing to do is to drop the ...


13

I have done this. I told them that my family situation necessitated a review of some parts of the benefits package prior to accepting the position. I have never had a problem getting an advance copy of these documents. For items that are a little more complex (IP issues) you should be able to get a copy of the documents they will be asking you to sign on ...


13

It sounds like you're in quite a jam. When you mention that you don't want to hire a lawyer, you'll get very vague answers here. I'll try my best. So, to add insult to injury, our junior HR manager has also ordered that nobody may carry a pocket knife, even a multitool like a leatherman, unless it's for religious reasons. First, on the the knife-...


13

I normally don't sign anything unless there's a benefit for me to do so. If they're offering compensation in return for indemnification, I'd think about it. But other than that, there's no way I'd ever agree to that. I mostly agree with your question. Why would you sign it? The only reason that it might burn a bridge if you want to use them as a reference, ...


13

From experience (mine and others): People value things according to how much they paid for them. Your "friend" paid nothing for your help. Guess how much he values you and your help: Zero. Because he didn't have to pay for it, your help to him is absolutely worthless. You saw this - he didn't come to meetings, giving just some lame excuse. If he had been ...


12

When a situation goes to HR trying to enforce absolutes rather than a first step of negotiating for peace among employees - I would say the situation has already gone quite far from normal. In something this weird, the first question is really - do you still want to work here? And what are your job prospects? The real bottom line is that you could end up ...


12

It doesn't hurt to ask. If you're useful and the budget is there, it's a simple decision.


11

Short answer: It's always better to inform them before you commence, rather than afterwards. Think about the processes involved in onboarding: Set up user accounts and access Building/safety induction Walk through/induction of code Introduction to staff ... These all cost the organisation time and money. More than anything, they take people away from ...


11

In your conversation with your employer, did you point out that you'd worked over the weekend to make his company more successful? If so, and he was still ranting, I wouldn't bother with a lawyer, I'd just start looking for a new position, as your efforts aren't appreciated.


11

In this context, date of agreed resignation is the last working day. When you hand out notice, you are informing about the upcoming resignation, and your last working day is when you actually resign and end official relation with your employeer.


11

Would it require less energy from you if the extended discussion were conducted through email? I find that FTF conversations tend to drain my energy, whereas (perhaps because I'm more comfortable as a writer than a conversationalist) I can pour a lot of time into email arguments without feeling exhausted or discouraged. Part of that may be because I am not ...


10

In general, employers are well aware that notice periods are pretty much universal and therefore don't expect that people they hire will be available to start tomorrow. Whether or not a month's notice is going to be acceptable to a particular employer isn't something we can tell you, but it's not a ridiculous length of time, particularly for a professional ...


9

As usual, this will depend on jurisdiction and (workplace) culture, but usually (at least in most of Europe), the basic rule is: Reaching and leaving the place of work is the employee's problem. If you think about that, it makes sense: It's not the employer's fault if your home is far away from the place of work; and even if they cared, you may not always ...


9

Only what is agreed on ahead of time by both you and the other party is owed. Unless there is some local law that specifically says you owe the recruiter damages (unlikely). I know of no legal mechanism whereby someone can demand money just because he is angry; this is not justified. Before you proceed, read the contract carefully to confirm that it does ...


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