10

Three months can make it tough - depending on the role some companies are certainly prepared to wait that long for the right candidate. Longer notice periods tend to track with more senior positions and most companies know that so I wouldn't rule out a company accepting the notice period as is. Can I just leave early and only give my organization 1 month ...


8

Is this too out of the ordinary to ask? Yes, it is. This would put you at risk of having negotiations cut off and binned. If that isn't a problem for you then go for it. Anything out of the normal box is risky if you don't have some sort of extraordinary leverage in terms of skill set or perhaps personal connection. This'll give us both the "feeling", ...


7

Notice periods vary by role. 3 months is a fairly common notice period for a senior software developer in the UK and even junior developers in some companies. If your role is one where a 3 month notice period is common, then it won't be a surprise to the recruiting company and in normal times many would be willing to wait 3 months for the right candidate. ...


5

Acquire some legal advise to check if this contract clause is actually valid in your jurisdiction. It might not be, but we are not lawyers, so we can not provide you with legal advise. If your legal advise says the contract is bullet-proof, ask your new employer if they would be willing to "buy you free" and cover the killfee in your contract. I ...


5

It feels like they put this into contracts to keep you locked into them. Notice period locks both parties in, which means that in most circumstances they cannot just outright fire you, but instead either have to keep you for the 3 months, or offer to pay you equivalent lump sum instead. By the same token this also protects the company from having employees ...


3

Is this too out of the ordinary to ask? I worked in many startups. In my entire career I never encountered a situation where a portion of a contributor's salary was based on revenue, not achievement, not profits, or anything else. I imagine it could make sense if for some reason the company cared solely about revenue, and not profitability, or quality, or ...


2

The problem is, no reasonable company or organization is willing to wait 3 months If you look at any company in UK they know they NEED to wait. Because such requirment is a part of hiring senior, or specialized, employees. That 3 months is for both sides, company know they have enough time to hire replacement and for knowledge transition. Employee knows ...


2

Anything in breach of your contract is a breach of your contract. There is no such thing as a "nice" breach of contract. If your contract says 3 month notice period, this is what you agreed to and this is what they will expect. If you don't give notice as required you might as well give no notice. There is no section in contract law that says "...


1

In a general sense they're allowed to do this: As the law presently stands, it is lawful for an employer to recover training fees from an employee who leaves employment within a certain time period after they have attended a training session, provided that:- There is a clear contractual provision in the employee’s contract of employment or in a separate ...


1

Notice period is always negotiable. If your company is in a situation where they put you on furlough (which means they could have laid you off put were nice enough to put 80% of your salary in your pocket), and they know you will stay on furlough for some time, and they know it is likely that they will have to let you go after that - what reason would they ...


1

What you say is: Even if there is no profit, and the valuation of the company goes down, I as an employee want to get a positive bonus while people who invested money into the company rack up losses. So, no, probably not going to happen: Even if you invest money into a company, you don't get part of the revenue. Variable salary is for letting employees ...


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