Podcast #128: We chat with Kent C Dodds about why he loves React and discuss what life was like in the dark days before Git. Listen now.
83

The primary (if not only) alternative to US employment law you will have access to is simply a written employment contract, which both the employer and employee sign and thus agree to be bound by. These employment contracts are relatively common at higher-level positions, and are commonly used to define severance packages, minimum notice periods, the time ...


71

Ahh, the old, "I'm the boss, but I want to be your friend" situation. I will tell you to answer your question directly without context, and then try with context. Namely, be the boss and not their friendly coworker. Tell them this is the job you have for them, and that's it. They are paid to do what you say and be done with it. But own up to your ...


46

However straightforward it appears to be, you have nothing at all to gain from signing it. And there is the potential to lose out if you accidentally breach something after signing it. Losing out might be getting sued, or losing the opportunity to apply for a job elsewhere.


35

You don't want to stop her from asking questions, because that's how accidents happen. You said that it helps you in one way and makes you think and that's a good thing and the only problem you have is with energy. If she's getting the job done and you don't always have energy then you can just tell her that you don't have the energy. When you do have the ...


33

If you are used to UK employment law and are about to be employed by a US firm you are entering a very different world. The short summary of your new situation is that of the protections and benefits you are used to virtually none of them will exist. I strongly advise you to get an expert on your side (i.e. one not working for either the US or UK company). ...


25

If there's one thing I've learned, it's that technicians are ignored at my peril. I would go the other way from the other answers and embrace this technician's feedback by formalizing the review process. Add a step to your process called "technician readiness review" where you solicit feedback from all your technicians (not just this one) about whether a ...


21

So they want you to give up a job without the reassurance of future employment. The sensible course of action is to say no. You do have rent to pay etc...


11

In this context, date of agreed resignation is the last working day. When you hand out notice, you are informing about the upcoming resignation, and your last working day is when you actually resign and end official relation with your employeer.


11

Would it require less energy from you if the extended discussion were conducted through email? I find that FTF conversations tend to drain my energy, whereas (perhaps because I'm more comfortable as a writer than a conversationalist) I can pour a lot of time into email arguments without feeling exhausted or discouraged. Part of that may be because I am not ...


9

In the past, I realized that I was also doing something similar. Tasks would arise that I saw little value in and didn't particularly want to do, so I would question them. I realized this and began to ask myself "What do I hope to gain by asking questioning this task?" It's not like you can just tell the client, "That's not worth doing." The client decides ...


8

The protections in the UK simply consist of a legal requirement that there be employment protections implicit in every employment contract. The absence of those protections in the US simply means that those protections are not implicit in every employment contract. This lack is no bar to having a contract in which they are explicit. That is, there is no ...


7

Contracts cannot change unilaterally, or they are not contracts. This is why they ask for your signature, because they need it. You are perfectly within your bounds to reject the change, or negotiate it in a way that would make it worth to you. Every contract change is a negotiation, and every negotiation can fail. That takes care of can, now for the ...


6

In most scenarios, "confidential/proprietary information" would typically mean company trade secrets, such as internal system knowledge, unannounced projects, contracts with 3rd-party clients, etc. That would typically not include employee non-compete/non-solicitation/non-disclosure agreements. You should be able to tell another company that you have an NDA ...


6

It's entirely reasonable as it was a factor in your choosing the position and you have other options. At this point it is still a negotiation, nothing is set in stone yet. It's really a trade off between how much you want the job and how hard you want to negotiate, but it's not off to a good start when they change things at the last minute. If I had other ...


5

Take this experience as a lesson and learn from it. You should not quit your job or in your case decline a job offer unless you have already accepted and signed a written offer. I would argue against pushing back as this company has at best demonstrated that they are incompetent and at worst demonstrated that they are deceptive. Walk away and pursue ...


5

The interesting part to this question is that you've not mentioned the actual topics. This helps in highlighting a key component here: we could pick either side depending on the topic. Maybe the technician is right and you are blindly asking her to perform menial and easily avoidable tasks. I've definitely worked in jobs like these, it's pretty much how I ...


5

This really needs a country tag! But anyway, here is another angle you could take: You can offer to leave voluntarily. In many countries and Legislation this makes it A LOT easier for your employer and can be a good bargaining chip. Then you offer to keep going as a freelancer for the type of work that shows up occasionally and that would be a "waste of ...


4

Unless you're still working with them in some capacity don't sign it, they can't legally force you to sign, they have no leverage over you to make you sign it and if you do sign it you could be setting yourself up for issues in the future if you accidentally breach it somehow. I would delete the email without even responding.


4

Some things I would try: Give her the task in writing, so she can't immediately complain Explain your thought process how you came to this solution, so she can see which parts you considered and what you missed Ask her for clear feedback what you maybe missed and how she would solve it Read those answers carefully and then start the next iteration with an ...


4

There is a dividing line between "what has to be achieved" and "how to achieve it". The first one is your responsibility, and assuming you are professional enough to own up to your mistakes when they happen, is not negotiable. The second one is certainly negotiable, if the technician has many years of practical experience and a good track record. The best ...


4

However it would be a lot easier on my finances if I stayed for another 2-3 months. I’m considering suggesting to my boss that I’d be happy to carry on working there for this period, and for me to just continue working the really basic kinds of projects that I’ve been given over the last few months (the kind where it’s a waste for them to be passed ...


4

You can always ask. They can always say "no". The one thing you can not do is demand unless you're willing to forego your promotion. If they say "no", see if you can narrow down the geographical area they have in mind. Will they want you to move to Shenzen, China? South Korea? Florida? If you do sign that clause and they relocate, you may forego your ...


3

All this is translated in that the days I have low energy, I do not tell her what needs to be done, I prefer instead to wait until the next day, because I start to see that we will spend one hour arguing unnecessarily about the tasks. Quite simply, she is taking advantage (don't have a better wording) of your availability to have an argument with you. There ...


2

This is a bad sign, but it doesn't necessarily mean it's a bad company, at least in the parts you'll be working in. (Are you talking to HR here, or a hiring manager?) If you really want to work for that company, it's reasonable to negotiate. At this point, I'd feel a little dubious about any promised review. Since the offered salary is only slightly ...


2

Would it be acceptable for me to accept their offer for now, and start looking for other jobs? Normally this is frowned upon, but given the circumstances I think it's fair game. Theoretically, if you sign the contract, and end up not joining without giving enough notice, you could be sued for damage (different countries have different rules about this, so ...


2

I definitely think you should hold off on flat out agreeing to their current terms. I've had a Spanish company send me an offer letter (which was signed and returned), then reassure me multiple times that "you have the job"... When I inquired about a hard start date so that I could give notice at my current job, they went silent for many months. This sounds ...


2

They have valued your spare time at £2000, what do you value it as? If money is not the issue, maybe ask them for some extra annual leave instead or to leave early on fridays. They have opened up negotiations with this new contract offer, you don't have to accept the first offer. If you really feel you cannot do it then talk to your boss and explain your ...


1

Here’s a possibility: The technician acts this way because she wants to look interested in the work (instead of just doing as she’s told), and it looks to her as if you appreciate this attitude because you explain things carefully to her. Your views and your actions are contradictory. So the next time when she complains, you just say: “Can you just do it ...


1

In Sweden and the IT industry you normally sign an employment contract when you get hired, then you quit your current job. When the notice period is up, you simply start at the new workplace with a six month probation period. This is more or less the norm in western Europe, with local variation. But my Polish contacts tell me of a very different work ...


1

You should really, really tell us where you are located. The contract means that you will be unemployed for at least one month. In many locations, such a contract will be void. On the other hand, even if void, you may have to fight about it in court. The next time you sign a contract, read it before signing, and strike out any terms like these. (I think ...


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