New answers tagged

1

As others have stated, good employees are worth their weight in gold. From an employer's point of view, especially as a new employer, it is hard not to feel that people are taking advantage of you (and some people will at times), but the greatest compass is opportunity cost: What will it cost you to not have someone working on that project for a month or ...


3

The contractor wanted to try-out. That goes both ways. If the contractor now misses out, that's the risk they took and you both agreed on. Whatever you do, don't start feeling sorry. As you've said, you've been quite generous already. Your question reads as if you find yourself between a rock and a hard place, but the situation isn't even close to that. ...


25

Something that needs to be said here - This candidate seems to be going out of their way to be SURE that this job is a good fit for them, and potentially that they're a good fit for the job. It may be frustrating, but would you rather they leave 6 months down the road and really railroad your business? I actually appreciate the idea - They're trying it out,...


20

I'm going to be just a bit harsh, here, but this needs to be said: You need to understand that the relationship between employer and employee is supposed to be an EQUAL one. That is: The employer receives more benefit from the work done than they would from the cash it cost them, and the employee receives more benefit from the cash they earned than the ...


68

You don't mention where you are, nor what industry you are in, so it is very hard for me to understand the relative magnitude in cost between the two employees, that said... You are looking to hire a person with a "particular skill that has been hard to locate". In fact, you've already been unsuccessful with two others that you've hired. Since then, you'...


35

I don't see how you've been railroaded, the contractor clearly knows he is in a good position to negotiate, and doing just that! Can't blame a guy for trying, right? You can't agree to his terms with a chip on your shoulder though, either you are good with the arrangement, or not, otherwise he is going to detect the animosity down the road and likely leave ...


-15

You need to be more firm and set better boundaries/expectations with your employees. This isn't a magical startup industry problem or even a job problem. It's a relationship problem, and their skill set is irrelevant to the power dynamic in your relationship. The reason you are having problems with this person is because you conceded to everything ...


5

Since the role requires very specific skills, you would first need to ensure that the Excellent Candidate (EC) accepts your offer and joins you, before you talk to the Difficult Contractor (DC) about anything. This is because as the chief show-runner of the startup, you can not afford to spoil any relations. Next, after EC has joined, be prepared with a ...


4

Generally speaking, your employer is not obligated to adjust your work schedule based on your hobbies or even another job. If you had this included in your contract, you might have some leverage, but you do not mention any such language. If travel to clients in other countries is a known part of the job (which it appears to be), it is not unreasonable for ...


0

"Still, I am in no position to leave until October 2020, as I am on a legally binding agreement with them to retain with them for 4 years (yes, the stupidest thing I have done in my life)." Is it reasonable/normal for someone in your job role to work abroad? This feels like a situation where you have to decide on a boundary and stick to it. We can't really ...


1

If I were in your place, below would be my course of action: Ask the other 3 coworkers if they are available and could cover me now by going. I would owe them one later. Ask the other 3 coworkers if I can swap with any of them in case any of them have a more preferable and convenient assignment. I would owe them one later. Check with Director if I can leave ...


9

It sounds like you work full-time with your current employer, and the lectures are not employer-sponsored (not part of your job). It's great that your employer has been accommodating of your lecture work in the past, but there is nothing that requires your manager and others to continue being accommodating. Here are some ideas of what you might consider: ...


0

Am I entitled to a certificate of employment from a previous employer? Absolutely not. You are entitled to truthful information from a previous employer. I was in the position to response to these questions; I was also responsible for our data retention requirements. We kept records of employees for 5 years after they left. Any further back and their ...


2

If a prospective employer needs to check dates, they'll ring the HR people at your previous company. This is 13 years ago.. pretty much irrelevant, and I'm sure the CEO will have forgotten you exist. It would have to be a very small company for the CEO to be involved in HR. So, not your problem. However... The issue gets confusing when you bring in the ...


5

So let me see if I have this straight. HR asked him for a series of documents He responded to that with interest and requests for clarification They responded with an offer letter. Additionally, your father would be in the US while entirely unable to speak English, and therefore highly vulnerable. This is highly likely to be a scam. Normal companies don'...


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