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32

Should I quit my job for before signing contract with another employer? NO. Rule of Thumb: Do not quit unless you have a written and signed agreement for the next employment. Any verbal discussion / assurance is not good enough to be held as true. There is no legal credibility of any verbal commitment made by any individual (whether in a personal capacity ...


19

If they expect you to quit your job before making you a written offer, it's utter nonsense. You probably don't want to have anything to do with them. Run and keep looking for other opportunities.


1

It's important to fill in the pronoun 'they' in your sentence: ...with "laws" stating they cannot fill a job in a location different than what was listed in the job posting. Is this at all true? Once you fill in the pronoun: with "laws" stating the recruiting company cannot fill a job in a location different than what was listed in the job ...


3

Likely, an external recruiter isn't allowed to fill position in other locations because of the way the contract between the employer and the recruitment agency works. This isn't illegal, but not everyone understands that breaking a contract isn't necessarily a crime and is a civil matter. If they're an internal recruiter, it may just be against their ...


5

Am I acting within my rights? Partially, I believe you're using company resources (email) to organise a meeting outside of the company to discuss company issues crosses a line. That's not to say you're not free to meet with whom ever you please outside of work for whatever purpose but if you organised it from company email (to or from) then IMHO that's not ...


0

The best action a disgruntled employee who can secure another employment can do is to leave. This is not the only the best choice for the employee, but also the best way said an employee can cause pain to the business. After you leave, you find better work, and then you are in a position to help your former co-workers move to the better company with you (...


1

I am young, unattached, dependent-less and work in a rapidly growing field. I have no concerns about job security If this is true, then your best course of action is to look for a new company to work for where HR and management will actually listen to feedback from their employees and that their employees do not feel that "nothing would happen" if they ...


2

This is a breach of privacy accidentally initiated by the HR of the company, which could be considered a red flag. It's none of your concern why that person was hired. I propose raising the issue to HR and ask for correct/updated information. Further digging from you would make you an accomplice of the breach. Do not do this.


3

Your last question was, Or in other words, how can I acquire more information on this position without leaving a bad impression and hurting my chances? To me, this is a much more answerable (and valuable) question than the one you started out with. You need to determine what your criteria are for the ideal next job, and then devise questions you can ask ...


17

You were sent information in error. Do not mention it ever again. You can ask why the position is open, but not about other specific candidates who were rejected as answering could potentially expose the company to liability. The hiring process is a strange thing. The things that can knock you out of the box can be anything from a weak handshake to ...


0

What am I liable for if I send a letter rescinding an employment contract i signed? Succinctly, you are liable for whatever the contract stipulates in case of resignation; within the limitations of the law if your culture has laws to limit these demands. Some cultures (e.g. mine) disallow any notice period that is longer than the time having been employed. ...


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