365

No, you should not expect to keep company-purchased equipment. This was paid for by the company, not by you personally, so it belongs to your employer, not to you. It doesn't matter that it was for your health needs. The desk can be easily re-used by another employee after you leave.


179

Amazon should allow for returns. Box them up and send them back. Before you order new, ask your boss for specific requirements, or ask your teammates for suggestions of what they'd like, then clear the purchase with your boss.


100

I believe there should be a line somewhere between suggesting / advising good practice and appearing pushy for implementation. You don't need to chase everyone, individually to make them follow the advise. Your organization made enough attempts to make the employees aware of the danger and given them guidelines for safe posture. Now it's up to them to ...


96

The biggest problem is you don't realize what you did wrong, and people are miffed about your obliviousness. Keyboards and mice are personal. Tournament gamers bring their own keyboards and mice. Tech workers regularly BYO keyboard and mouse because they'll be on it 8h/day. They even make retro "clacky" IBM keyboards. I won't have a keyboard that has \ ...


80

It may be too late this time, but the expenditure per employee is small in terms of their happiness and productivity, so a do-over is probably of net benefit to the business. Perhaps a reasonable budget can be set and each person allowed to make their own choice - subject to some rules about allowed/disallowed categories or requirements. If you end up ...


72

Do you also plan to take the computer, monitor, phone, etc with you? The answer to your question is likely the same for them. It's equipment purchased by the company for the purpose of you doing your job. I have a 43" monitor on my desk and a pair of $200 noise cancelling headphones. I'd sure love to take both with me on my last day in 2 days. But ...


66

We could inform my colleagues, during our monthly meeting, that they will be hearing a beep over the PA system. They could use this beep as an audio cue to re-align or adjust the posture. Oh holy noodle.. that sounds truly awful. Not only is it guaranteed to be annoy a large portion of the workforce it also wont be particularly effective. Assuming you have ...


57

Why are you purchasing new equipment? If the users don't have a problem with their current equipment, and prefer it over the alternative you have provided, then you seem to be creating a problem that did not exist. People tend to be pretty vocal about keyboards and mice that don't work or fit well because they are constantly annoying; just because they are ...


47

People tend to react strongly against: 1) Being spied upon and having transgressions alerted to everyone in the office 2) Being told how to live their lives 3) Being distracted when someone else in the team earns the "posture police" alarm tone (assuming they can hear it over their headphones) 4) People in the team who repeatedly and intentionally sets off ...


38

I had this problem at my last job -- banks of lights meant that you couldn't just turn off your overhead light (and we weren't allowed to remove individual tubes). Your decision affects other people, so you have to work with them to find a solution that makes everybody happy. If your coworker's problem is only that she would be left in the dark, then get ...


37

I myself struggle with maintaining my posture sometimes, and have found browser extensions/add-ons to be a useful solution. I use one called PostureMinder (available on Firefox as well as Chrome to my knowledge, and maybe others). You simply set it to pop-up small desktop messages every x minutes to remind you to maintain a good posture. There are options ...


36

I put up an umbrella on the top of my cube where it would block that bright light. Works great!


31

Here's a general thought on some tips: Realize that in any mass purchase, there is no "perfect for everyone" - since people have very different physical attributes and ways of working - even with a consistent activity (like labtop use) - the ergonomic side is going to have to be a compromise. When you're buying for an office, consider the balance of ...


30

Aside from following Dan's advice, which is very good, and which I won't repeat here. I'd also make sure to make those requests in writing. It's much more difficult to turn down requests like these, when they're made in writing, because if the employee does get hurt, then there is a paper trail actually proving it was the fault of the person rejecting the ...


29

Get a desk lamp. Get one with a swing arm/adjustable that can direct the light toward your desk surface, rather than spread the light over others' work surfaces. Something like this might work: https://smile.amazon.com/dp/B0744984HF/ (Personally, unless you are a mushroom, I don't understand the attraction of dark office spaces. I like lots of light - ...


27

As others already stated, these items are company property unless some unusual law is applicable, or you paid for it, either directly or as a deduction from salary. That said, if you believe such item would not benefit any further employee, it is OK to ask if the company is willing to sell it to you. For example, headphones and microphones that are hard to ...


24

My company recently changed offices, and we upgraded our chairs during the move too. We had a (presumably office supply) vendor bring in an assortment of candidate chairs for about a week, and there was an email sent to all (roughly 100) employees in that office requesting feedback about the chairs. I tried out the chairs, and for me there was a clear ...


24

Most people have gone back to their old keyboard and mouse and my boss won't approve returning them, he just says "you need to fix this". Issue is fixed. Most people have returned to using their old equipment. Keep the new stuff for new hires or when keyboards or mice break. On a more serious note, your users will likely have made a similar choice in ...


24

Assuming your colleages are all grown-ups I find it quite ridiculous to have a posture police to make everyone sit straight. I bet they are all very aware of the damages bad posture can cause. It is up to them to decide what to do with that information. And what's next? Enforce a healthy food policy and beep on people's ears when they have chocolate and ...


23

In the USA, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) is offering a purchasing guide checklist that can help you find the proper equipment you need. They also offer a checklist on good working positions that I reproduced below. Working Postures The workstation is designed or arranged for doing computer tasks so it allows your: Head and ...


23

Here's an anecdote a friend told me. It was the 80's and in the company's multistory building, they were installing computers, which required coaxial cable to be run everywhere, which in turn required a lot of drilling in concrete. (Some folks will remember the days of incessant drilling.) Of course, to save resources, the coax was run in one hole up the ...


21

To help your eyestrain you need to take your eyes off the screen in front of you and change your focus at regular intervals. Our sight works by detecting edges and movement and works best if our eyes are constantly looking at new things at different distances and in different light conditions. You don't have to do this every 10 minutes, but every hour (or ...


19

One thing no-one else has mentioned: keep your glasses scrupulously clean. I find that if my glasses are even slightly dirty, for instance a single light fingerprint, I start getting eye-strain much more quickly. I usually clean my glasses by washing them in soapy water, and then drying them with either a previously unused tissue or a lint free cloth. The ...


17

Worst. Idea. EVER. First - Go to any site (or even google) advice how to keep focus at work. In most in the "worst" three there are audio cues. All advise to turn of outlook notifications, Skype/lynk/communicators "pings", generally block distractions. Here you are adding distraction for everyone targeted at one person. At random time you take 15 minutes ...


17

This depends on who paid for the item in question. If your employer bought it for you, they get to keep it. If you paid it yourself, or if you received a grant from your health insurance, retirement insurance or some other agency (this is possible e.g. in Germany, to enable you to continue to work, referred to as "Zuschuss zu Hilfsmittel am Arbeitsplatz"), ...


16

You are in a bad spot. Some people are very particular about what they want in their office environment. I, for instance, want sunlight. I don't care about a private office, noise, or how many stairs I have to climb, but I need to be able to see the sun. Your colleague got completely bashed by your manager, and he's mad. Given that he was last in the ...


16

There seems to be quite a bit of wishful thinking going on in some of these answers and comments. The (corporate) world doesn't work the way it should, it works the way it works. Having recently managed several team and floor relocations for around 200 people, introducing hot-desking to several teams at the same time, I came to learn two things: People get ...


15

Ask site safety and/or whoever deals with human factors and adaptive technology to give their opinion of your setup. I suspect the issue isn't your desire for a standing workstation (though not everyone is familiar with the idea and you may need to do some education before it's accepted) , but how you're achieving it. Before anything else, it has to be safe ...


14

One solution that worked for me was to change the bulb! As well as the standard fluorescent tubes, you can get ones that put out light similar to natural light (seemed slightly blue until I got used to it), didn't think it would do much, but it was actually a huge positive change. I seem to remember they were a bit more expensive, but definitely worth it. ...


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