Hot answers tagged

136

One useful test for ethics questions is "If everyone with an interest in this issue knew exactly what I am doing, would they act differently or think less of me?" By that test, you answered your own question when you wrote "I do not intend to disclose the fact that I received help from a close friend." If you really thought it was ethical,...


105

Leave. I personally would feel bad about causing a company to go under. The company isn't exactly well-off at the moment... Additionally, I have not received my previous month's salary yet. This strongly hints the company is already going under. The business plan of the company relies on revenue from a product that does not exist, can not be delivered on ...


61

First, there is no such thing as a diverse candidate. A person is not diverse. A team may be more diverse if it hires a candidate that is different from its current members in one or more ways, and the team may well be improved by becoming more diverse. When you call a person diverse, you other them, and you ignore the genuine benefits their differences ...


43

Is this unethical? The short answer is: Yes You would be able to do your own research, so Google, use other sources (textbooks) for your task. To ask someone to edit your work for you means it is not your own work. After all the employer is paying for your expertise, and what you can bring to the organisation. I would suspect you would not be the only ...


33

At the beginning, I was going to tell you "have you had a proper conversation", because communication is always the answer. However, a few things are making me think that, well, you might be getting used (my apologies for being so forward): Your contract is technically over and he "guilt trips you", He hasn't paid your last salary, He ...


33

@hk88 I applaud you for having human decency left to feel "icky" about those things. You are right to feel "icky": these practices are outright illegal and violate federal equal opportunity laws, but the activists in power who push such agenda do not seem to care (and in a blue state chances are courts don't care either). As to what you ...


32

Yes, it's unethical. When I test someone, I want to know how they think more than how right they are. I gave a technical interview once where the guy couldn't answer any of my (deliberately difficult) questions. We hired him, because he gave HONEST answers. Technical deficiencies can always be addressed through training/education and are not deal breakers ...


24

I know that HR is supposed to protect a company and, in this case, getting rid of X was the correct action to pursue this goal, but: is such a level of Machiavellian machination a standard for HR? Can I do something to prevent them doing this against me in the future? But they didn't protect the company. If X finds out HR lied; that HR retaliated by making ...


17

I have a Graduate Certificate in Women and Gender Studies. I have studied multiple dimensions of diversity (gender, race, sexual orientation, socioeconomic status, nationality, etc.), with a primary focus on women. I also have a Masters Degree in Computer Science and have worked as a software engineer for almost 20 years. With regards to women in the ...


15

I'll try to answer the question you're asking as best I can (even if I don't necessarily agree with the premise.) Likely, the core problem you're running into isn't the mechanism for selecting candidates, or anything on that front. And to be frank, it's actually illegal to use race as a selection criteria. However, there is a definite potential for bias in ...


15

Factors other than qualifications are considered in hiring all. the. time. Normally it's something companies like to call "the cultural fit" and in most situations it favors people from "the majority". Also, while hiring, getting someone who is qualified (i.e. has the hard skills necessary to do the job) is just one of the goals. There ...


14

I think it's a grey area. If they did the work for you, would be unethical. If they did part of it for you, it would be unethical. You doing it all and after it's done getting suggestions on how to improve it? Assuming you do the improvements yourself and don't have them done by them, I'd say that's very borderline okay-ish. I mean it's what we do. We work ...


14

Have candidates to put black on their profiles or other gender in their things. I was in technical recruiting for my firm and my team found some people we really wanted to move through the HR politically correct quagmire. We found the way to do it was to tell them to just lie on the profiles. The creatures in HR got to meet their diversity quota and my team ...


13

Employment is a bilateral business contract. One person works, the other person pays. When one side doesn't fulfill their side of the bargain, the other isn't obligated to do so either. You are under no obligation to keep working for a failed business. When your employer makes promises which you can not keep, that's his problem, not yours. When their ...


12

Leave. NOW. Your boss is likely already violating multiple laws by coercing you into staying beyond your contract and by not paying you (although IANAL, this should not be construed as legal advice, and you really should talk with a lawyer once you leave to figure out how to recoup your missing paycheck). On top of that, he's lying to his customers, in their ...


11

An answer to this is difficult and depends on the company, country and whether it does actually have an effect on the company. If you still fill all positions with qualified candidates in time, then there is no problem, at least from the perspective of the company. You have a position, you get someone diverse to fill it, case closed. Whether there are still ...


10

You are right, it's not nice to call a grown woman "girl". It's not respectful. Technically, you are right to put it in there. However, you should think about whether that is the world you want to live in: where every little one-time occurrence of going against the rules is immediately written down and filed with HR. You said yourself, the person ...


9

How your manager chooses to interpret this action is up to him and there's no way we can know for sure. However, in my experience, people managers are mostly concerned with making sure their team has the tools they need to deliver quality work in a timely manner. If the head of purchasing has agreed to the SSD upgrade, I don't think it's likely that your ...


9

All of this was fairly evident with your other question. All the signs were there clearly. As to if this is normal, just look at all the many, MANY times that I have posted "HR IS NOT YOUR FRIEND" There is a reason that Scott Adams made "Catbert" head of HR. He picked a cat because cats like to toy with their prey before killing them. ...


8

Many companies are pushing for equality in the workplace, which I think is great.. However, I can't deny that I feel morally icky about leaving a qualified candidate in the candidacy pool because of what essentially comes down to their gender and skin color. I agree with you on both points - Equality is wonderful and employment free from discrimination is ...


7

While I agree that "leave" is probably your best option, let's go a bit deeper for the sake of explanation: Your boss may be a yes-man but you don't have to be. When your boss says "this looks simple, it should take a day or two" and you know it will take a week, don't be afraid to push back. You are the technical expert, and you ...


6

Full disclosure: I fit into several "diversity" groups myself. First, check and see if you don't already have it. Many people, especially those of us who are older, don't advertise some traits that fall under the "diversity" umbrella. LGBTQ people were usually "in the closet", as back in the day being "out" was far ...


6

Agree with all the advice above. Also consider that if he is lying to customers or investors, in an effort to get more money for an unfinished project, the legal ramification and potential lawsuit(s) could involve you as well. Maybe not directly, but as an 'employee' of the company, you could be dragged in. I get not wanting to leave them high and dry ...


6

Ignore it/use it to your benefit as best you can and focus on acquiring power in your career. Organizational change doesn't happen from people on the lowest rung of the ladder. I suspect that you are facing a managerial target to increase diversity and the simplest way to do that is just to throw out all candidates that do not fit that profile. I have HR ...


5

Send them both. Then tell them you had a code review done by colleague that knew the subject and implemented his/her suggestions.


4

I do not intend to disclose the fact that I received help from a close friend. I can only see two reasons not to disclose this fact. One is that you know in your heart that you were cheating. The other is that you know in your heart the prospective employer should be looking to hire your close friend rather than you. Most colleges require that students sign ...


4

The question is not whether you should leave, but how you should leave. Your first priority should be getting paid. You know these people, so think about which of them is more likely to help you collect. All else being equal, go to the one that manages the finances. At the first I recommend being nice but firm, expecting immediate payment. "I know ...


4

Despite the fact that you've clearly asked for answers that don't say you're focused on the wrong problem, that's really the point: You're focused on the wrong problem. Here's the question: Let's say I gave you a team of 10 straight white men who could complete your project in 1 week and would produce zero major bugs. I could also give you a team of 10 ...


4

Aren't you overcomplicating things? Do you really need theoretical frameworks, peer-reviewed scientific literature and complicated metrics in order to hire people from groups which are yet underrepresented in your company/teams and create a welcoming environment for them? What about a little common sense? Here is some If you want women to feel welcome and ...


4

I believe requesting to change projects is perfectly valid given the circumstances you present: you have experience working on demotivating projects, you raise concerns about your ability to remain motivated, and the project is objectively possibly ethicaly problematic, so in my book it's fine to ask. Bonus points since you're willing to compromise short ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible