Hot answers tagged

105

You've kind of broken one of the first rules of freelancing. There is an old consultant's rhyme that goes: Roses are red, Violets are blue, Pay me. You've given this person free work long enough that now they expect it. It's time to put a stop to that. I would recommend finishing what is on your plate and telling them that you can't continue until your ...


68

As long as you think that you need good reasons to turn down underpaid freelance work you don't enjoy doing, you will be stuck doing this forever. Your reasons need only be good enough for you. Next time he asks you to make a change or to do something, tell him "My apologies, but that will not be possible." If he starts to argue or tell you why it ...


29

This is what you should email: You need to pay me all the money you owe me. I need to be paid in full. Until you can make this happen, I'm indefinitely suspending this contract. This has gone long enough. When he starts calling you, you repeat yourself like a broken record, and you say something like: I need to be paid in full now. Do you have my payment ...


18

You need to focus on your responsibilities to your staff member and your region. Head Office are the only ones who can solve this, so you need to talk to them, outline what you perceive to be the issue and work with them towards a solution. At this point don't worry about other regions not liking it or anything else of that nature; you have a responsibility ...


9

I want to convey this to him in a professional and diplomatic manner with a SOLID REASON You don't need to convey anything but a bill. One solution which I always use is fairly simple. Whatever eventuates you win. Email him an invoice and request payment politely, then ignore anything that doesn't include payment of it. Do not get into a dialogue about ...


9

In the United States, at least, professionalism usually means you don't give a valid reason. Employers don't give you the actual reason for terminations because, among other things, it could: open them up to lawsuits for possible wrongful termination may disclose sensitive company information (eg. the company isn't doing so great, financially) can give the ...


8

If you have certificates, awards, and souvenirs that are industry wide rather than specific to your employer, by all means bring them to work. That mug a podcast sent you after you appeared? That certificate you earned after 6 months of studying and a seven-hour exam? Absolutely, they belong in your office. Things that have only the logo of your former ...


7

This really should be viewed as an extension of Kilisi's answer. I just want to speak about policies in general. Generally speaking, policies are not legally binding. A company can decide to overrule or violate its own policy if it feels like the situation warrants it. (I want to note that a company breaching its own policies can be a factor in certain types ...


6

Generally you don't write a job description that isn't clear in the hopes that you don't scare away candidates. Because it's better not to have a candidate than hire someone who quits or has morale issues shortly after joining. So, your first recourse is to decide exactly what you do want, discount the maybe/optional/wishy washy stuff and advertise the role ...


6

I have mugs, coasters, etc. from previous employers that I enjoy using It's a mug. It's not that important. Find a new mug. may be perceived by your current colleagues as pretentious. That'll be because it is pretentious. I don't care what you did at your previous employer, I care that you're productive in your new role. Realistically, are these things ...


6

This is what you say to this person: "You've never taken this class with me. Please don't say that you have." To which the person will respond by saying: "You've heard wrong. I've never said that. Who said that? Blah blah..." Because that's what pathological liars do when confronted with their lies, they double down with more lies. But ...


5

You can ask, but you should refine your pitch and try to find ways to make it palatable to your current employer. If this were just a night/side gig, then you wouldn't necessarily have to involve them, depending on the laws in your location and your employment agreement. Some places have "no moonlighting" policies or "moonlighting only with ...


5

Disclaimer: I am not a resident of California, nor am I a lawyer, but I have read some contracts from California-based companies, so I have a reasonable understanding of the standard "at-will" employment system. My understanding is that California is an "at-will employment" state. What this means is that the employer is allowed to fire ...


5

The simple answer is, politely decline. Your language would be Thanks, but I'm only interested in the amount discussed which was 6,000. Be prepared to walk away if they don't come around.


4

It's a little underhand. Sometimes the person who hired you may have genuinely forgotten that probation pay is less than full pay. The savings to the company are only a few thousand, assuming your probation period is only a few months. The key point is that since you haven't signed anything you are still free to negotiate. Reply to the company and say "...


4

IMO, just ask them. Hey X, I’m looking at hiring someone to do some personal assistant work for me such as [the examples you listed above]. Would you be interested in adding that to your paid work? Just wanted to give you first refusal before I go looking externally. The key points are: You’re going to hire someone either way (so they don’t feel pressured to ...


4

The first clause contains the conditions. It's saying that if you use company resources (equipment, supplies, facilities, trade secrets) either during working hours or outside of them to create something, or if you recreate the company's inventions ("reduction to practice"), either existing or proposed, then the company owns that work. It's pretty ...


3

The main and most convincing reason is that your work has not been paid. Why would you continue spend your time for something that only waste your time and resources. My suggestion would be demand all the outstanding money that you are owed and then resign.


3

It doesn't sound like this person thinks code is worth paying for. It's highly unlikely that you'll ever get paid properly, even when it's live, so every minute you spend on it is a big liability. You said: I seriously want to permanently get rid of him Refusing to do any more work until you're paid for the time you've spent so far should do the trick. ...


3

I think you should always put yourself first. Your employer comes second. If the money or the job isn't right, then you do what you want by leaving. He promises you payment which is empty because if he was genuinely going to pay you, he would've done so BEFORE you actually did the work. You ALWAYS get paid first, then implement. No payment, no work. My ...


3

It sounds from your question like if one of them gets the job, the other will find out. 3 seconds later they'll also find out you told both about the job. So hiding it isn't an option. So your best bet is to be ethical and open. Tell each, "by the way, I circulated the job to a few other contacts and friends", and explain you are a bit embarrassed ...


3

There are good answers already, but no one has addressed the risk. Normally they have zero interest in your previous work, and they expect you to be fully committed. So this is unusual enough that it may have them searching for your replacement. Within a company it's fairly normal for edge case or emergency situations where you have special knowledge or ...


2

Awkward or not, this is a question that only your current supervisor can answer, as they are in charge of coordinating your work. I don't think it would be inappropriate to ask. Simply bring it up with them in a positive and respectful way: Hey boss, I'm excited for my new role here. I'm also wondering if it would be possible to work 2 or 3 days a month in ...


2

Nobody cares about utility things. There are exceptions, but generally? Nobody's going to care whether your coffee mug says "Some Random Prior Company", "Coding Fuel Within", or "Worlds Greatest Dad". It's a mug - you use it to drink coffee from. Same thing with most utilitarian items. General rule of thumb: if it's not a ...


2

It is standard operating procedure. As a professional, I expect that type of wording. What this does is to give right of first refusal to the company for anything that you invent on the side, but may have benefited from what you learned while employed. We don't always know what can be profitable for the company to use. For example, Glidden Paint hired a guy ...


2

Assuming that you are paying for it, it is perfectly fine. Now if you were the CEO but not the owner of the company, and I did work for you privately paid for by the company, that's like stealing from the company and should be a reason to fire you. Now the job I'm doing pays quite well. More than cutting the grass at your home pays. I would most definitely ...


2

This has been asked before, but to keep it brief: Completely standard Maximalist wording by default Negotiable if you are a high status employee (in some places this includes valued tech staff). In smaller companies, they may be in particular most concerned about the "business subcategories" of the various things under the "IP" umbrella, ...


2

Be honest about it. If you communicate clearly that you like your job and the team chances are you can come to an agreement that lets you rejoin the company (or even better: still work for the company during your study time. That's how it's done in Germany). If you don't say anything until end of June, your boss might not take it very well.


1

I'm gonna focus on just one part of the question: because he starts convincing me with his arguments and emotional stuff whenever I tried something similar in past My guess is that he does this on the phone, and not with text messages, i.e. email. The solution is simple, don't talk to him on the phone. Block him. If you want you can send an email saying ...


1

To directly answer your specific question, "I want to convey this to him in a professional and diplomatic manner with a SOLID REASON because he starts convincing me with his arguments and emotional stuff whenever I tried something similar in past." Tell him this, Namaste Darsh, unfortunately I am not able to do any freelance, as my full-time job ...


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