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4

Being a shy person, I can't counter what she says If she's actually wrong on something she's telling you to do then of course you can counter it. You're choosing not to - I don't say this to get at you. I'm point out that you actually do have the power to act differently. I'm not saying it's easy but you can work on your confidence. Just saying "I can't" ...


1

Do I tell him he's forgetting or reap the benefits of additional time off since we only get so many days a year? Another option is: do neither. Maybe you are not on best terms with your boss, or are afraid to be misunderstood or don't want to be seen as complaining. And that's okay. What is not okay is using the mistake to your own advantage by unfairly ...


4

Do I tell him he's forgetting or reap the benefits of additional time off since we only get so many days a year? It might entirely be possible that the manager is just keeping a separate note somewhere for all the leaves applied by all the employees (which are approved) and updating the system only once in a while. Though not very common, it's possible. It ...


0

From an ethical standpoint, you agreed to work a certain amount of days for a certain amount of money. So yeah, you should go to (reasonable) amount lengths to remind your boss. From a more cynical, practical standpoint, you should also tell him. It would be fairly easy for your boss to find out if you've been taking too many days off. While he might think ...


3

Do I tell him ? Yes, but do it in writing. You want to create a paper trail that clearly shows that this is not your error or even malicious intent. Not logging time-off correctly is a potentially serious offense that can be interpreted "stealing from the company" or "fraud". You want to make crystal clear that whatever happened is not your fault and that ...


1

Do I tell him he's forgetting or reap the benefits of additional time off since we only get so many days a year? I'm sure you know what the right thing to do is. I can tell you that most managers would appreciate the honesty.


2

Do I tell him he's forgetting Yes, but in a nice way. Something like: Hello boss, do you remember that you approved me a sick leave on ... (date). I see that it does not appear in the system, and I worry that ... (reason; e.g. you will not have enough vacation days) Will you please verify and eventually enter the info again? You might continue: Maybe ...


2

Yes A salary review every year (or even every 6 months at some places) is not unusual in most jobs (at least the ones I've been at). Obviously your job doesn't have this structure, but I don't think it's unreasonable to ask for a review after 12 months since your last. Just set up a meeting with your boss and discuss all your achievements over the last 12 ...


5

I think you should get this cleared first if they have an annual performance review or not. You should contact the HR of the company to get clarity on the same. it's appropiate for me to ask for a review this year? Yes, absolutely yes! If you're working so hard and if the company has a review policy then why not? Why not ask for what you deserve? or ...


4

It seems to me that your job is about how I would expect a (European) government job to be like (you said it is not directly government, but the government is their only customer, so this comes to the same). You have high job security (probably excellent benefits as well, especially compared to the US) and low stress but the technology used is decades out of ...


9

As sf02 said, you are doing parts of your job description: Development. Working on old code is often no fun, but also reality of software development. As senior dev, come up with a plan to improve the situation! Not only for you, but also for the employee. By your description, the current application is a source of never ending bugs. It seems, you have to ...


1

It is possible that because you are not an employee, with proof of substandard pay, that you would not be able to report this anyway. But you could find out for the employees, what the process would be. You could call the local/state/district authorities and ask what the process is for reporting a business that pays less than minimum wage. Let them know ...


7

Whatever you do, do not do anything without your friends' permission. I believe your friend has two years to file with the Department of Labor of your State. So that one year of partial wage theft hasn't been lost yet, the Department of Labor can recover it for her, even if it means going after the personal assets of the owner. Also note, that the ...


11

First, you need to step back and evaluate what exactly you were hired to do. You stated that you were promised to be: acting as a developer but also some kind of mentor because their employees don't know about best practices and modern techniques If this is correct, then the work that you are currently doing is exactly what you were promised. One task ...


0

Might need to put in a location but generally speaking in USA at-will worker the "graceful" thing to do is give a 2 weeks notice. For contracts and otherwise, you might need to give a more advanced notice. Generally a bad idea to tell the boss you're going to quit unless you already have a job on hand and ready to leave. They may let you go, even though ...


7

Until you have handed in your notice, you are still working there and you should continue working there as normal - including taking any training you are asked to (so long as there are no strings attached with repayment etc.) The reality is, you do not know for certain that you will leave shortly - until you have actually tendered your notice. Perhaps the ...


13

They always say don't let anyone know at your job if you are leaving as this can make work life difficult. Thank them, they are right. Continue as usual, until it's time to submit your resignation (i.e., you have a confirmed offer with you) and then, serve the notice period and leave. Till then, continue as usual, including accepting the salary, promotion, ...


13

You really should try to understand your laws. I mean, he is infringing on my first amendment The First Ammendment says: Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the ...


7

Although a handful of states have some protections around political speech in the workplace, Prevailing opinion from employment law experts is that employees don't inherently have the right to express their political views in the workplace as they do in a broader context. To put it another way, your right to free speech doesn't inherently extend into the ...


1

Have you never heard “Never discuss politics or religion in polite company?” Consider the office "polite company." You've probably selected one of the three most likely topics to draw negative attention from someone. Inciting problems in the workplace is essentially never a good plan.


7

Keep in mind that both the office and the monitor are company property, not yours. They're allocated to you for the purpose of doing what you're paid for, not for the purpose of displaying political messages, no matter how correct the message may (or may not) be. Based on that, your grounds for any complaints are rather iffy, and the whole thing is not ...


-1

If you have actual evidence that this co-worker is turning off your PC then you should confront them and ask them to stop. If they do not stop their behavior then you should escalate to your manager and let them deal with it. When confronting your co-worker or your manager don't bring up your screensaver as it is irrelevant to the co-workers alleged ...


19

What is the most optimal way of handling it? Change your screensaver to something more professional and politically-neutral. Suing the company for something like this may be a long shot, and something not to be done lightly in any case (if any at least consult a lawyer first before attempting anything)...


3

This is one reason why the common sense approach to screensavers, and desktop backgrounds, is a professional approach. While you might think your image of Batman or The Spice Girls or Dastardly & Mutley or your partner catching some rays is harmless, there is always someone who can, and will, be offended. Sometimes nothing happens, other times they ...


3

In South Africa unfortunately most employers include a clause in the employment contract that states your job description includes "any reasonable request to do a task that you are capable of doing". Sadly this means that even if you are employed as a receptionist, you may be requested/instructed to do some cleaning. Unless you can prove you are not capable ...


-1

I have no idea of South-African labor laws or your specific promotion or demotion so lets stay with a hypothetical example for a while: Lets assume you are a fruit merchant by contract. You were assigned to sell apples. Some possible scenarios: You are asked to stand in for your washer, who had an accident on the way to work and will not return for 2 days. ...


0

This doesn't sound good. Either your boss is a pushover, and caves into demands from subordinates for reasons unknown, or if the colleague who was unhappy is above your boss, this suggests confusion in the chain of command and miscommunication. Worse, he gave you a demotion as if it was nothing. Which it is, because your promotion came with no salary hike in ...


0

I good outcome would be if in two years time your colleagues would say “we know he was hired because of his connection, but we are still glad to have him here”. So go and look for work. Where I work, I’d have no problem keeping you busy for the next year, and so could several colleagues of mine. It wouldn’t be the most urgent and important work, but it ...


3

In law, there is a concept of mens rea or guilty mind. The idea is that some crimes actually depend on the actor's state of mind. Suppose you walk off with someone else's coat at a party. That action might be innocent (you have a coat that looks just like it) or criminal ("Hey, cool coat. I bet I could pawn this for some quick cash") depending on your state ...


5

Two observations, which may or may not be relevant to your case: Hiring someone for an internal position is a medium to long term decision, otherwise one would get a freelancer. Your job during the first weeks, even months, is to become part of the company. Productive work comes later. Your manager (or your manager's manager) may know about upcoming ...


1

If the "owner" is the owner of the building management company, then the owner would have a nice little conversation with the building manager, and explain to her that he doesn't appreciate if the building manager subtly tries to assign blame to him for her own mistakes. If the "owner" is the owner of the building that the building manager manages, he ...


1

Job ads aren't contracts. There's nothing illegal about misrepresenting a job opening in a help-wanted posting, either on your employer's web site or some job board. But it is strange behavior. Hiring good people is really hard work, and keeping good people on the payroll isn't easy. If your org has a full-time job to offer it's wise to mention that fact ...


5

I'd say: this is not particularly all-round nepotism, you received a preferential treatment because of your networks. As I read, you mentioned that the vacancy was created for you, but you were not waived off the process of recruitment. Given that the post is legit, and you did not receive any favoritism during the hiring process (Interview etc.) - I'd not ...


50

Stay and figure out something to do. This is a spectacular opportunity. most successful software company in the country I live in I might have a different answer were this just some random firm, but you are essentially saying that you work at your country's equivalent of Shopify (for Canada) or Tencent (China). Are you a nepotism hire? Probably. Will ...


1

This : "Since there was no vacancy I almost never have work, which is depressing" - polish your CV and start looking. When you land a job on your own merits, you will have a feeling of self-worth, not self-doubt, as at present. Keeping in mind that this is the most successful software company in the country I live in, should I accept this offer or not? ...


6

I doubt there is anything you can do Aren't job postings considered legal contracts? No, they are advertisements. Job postings don't even need to have a real job behind them. Plenty of companies post them to see if some star walks in the door. Inaccuracies are almost something to be assumed when applying for a job. HR refused to correct the errors. ...


5

The hiring process end when the negotiations are over. That means either contract is signed and employee starts working or at least one part drop. Actually, there are no obligations during the process. If you are invited to (another) interview it may be cancelled. Same way, you are not obligated to go there either. On the other hand it is considered polite ...


11

It's unethical to enter into an interview process when you have no intention of completing it or accepting any resulting offer. This is a deliberate waste of everyone's time, and does indeed deliberately dilute the attention available to other candidates. Otherwise, changing your mind and deciding to withdraw at any point after you start is completely fine. ...


13

As this is tagged India, I don’t know if you’re from there yourself, but keep in mind cultural differences. In many less-developed countries employees have very few rights, should have great respect for the company that employs them, as well as their superiors. Differences between rich and poor are much greater and a lot of people are being exploited for ...


42

I am the candidate who backed out of the process. I was told by the officer at college that I brought bad name to the college by doing so. I am not sure what wrong did I do. That's why I am asking question as a third person. – Rohan You took the University's commission away from them (or possibly, if bribery was involved, you nullified the University ...


2

Over the passage of time architectural drawings, artistic renderings, can be worth a lot of money. Don't trivialize your work. Respect yourself and respect your work and DO NOT let this person use you as a doormat! Otherwise it will not stop. They are taking business from you. Find our about any legal remedies and tell them to stop. Meanwhile an external ...


85

This begs the question whether it is ethical on the part of the candidate to clear two rounds of interview and back out of the final round stating the interview didn't go well? Of course it's ethical. However and whenever a candidate reached the conclusion that they no longer want to carry on, dropping out at that point is the right thing to do. It ...


42

This begs the question whether it is ethical on the part of the candidate to clear two rounds of interview and back out of the final round stating the interview didn't go well? The company has the right to reject up until they make an offer. Heck, companies reject most people they interview. Why doesn't the candidate get the same right? Is it right to ...


212

An interview is a two way process, and just because someone is offered an interview, they are not obligated to take it. At the point either side decides that this is not going to work out: the hiring manager decides they definitely will not hire the applicant, or the applicant deciding they definitely are not going to take the job, it is fine to end the ...


10

You own the moral rights to your work. You may be able to exercise those rights under the copyright laws of your country. Furthermore, if this contractor is illegally pretending to be an architect, that puts him in a precarious legal situation. He's defrauding his clients. In my country, if plans get signed by a fake architect, that puts everything else in ...


-1

The primary question here is: Who owns the information (IP)? If the client owns the information, and they are acting as a re-seller, I do not think there is much you can do, as they have the control over the information and how that is used. They are quoting the higher rate for re-sale, but no one is bond to comply with that rate and get the information. ...


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