New answers tagged

-1

Separate your professional and personal life Company X hired you to do some development work for them: they give you money, you give them the code. Money now belongs to you, code belongs to them . Now, they want from you to connect their software with 3rd party services. You offered to build full SDK, they say they do not have time (and money) for that, ...


3

Without An Agreement, That’s A Hard No It is not OK without an agreement from your company (NOT just your manager). You have almost certainly signed an IP agreement that says everything you develop while employed at your company is their intellectual property, especially things directly related to its legitimate interests, as this would be. And even if you ...


1

There is a potential ethical problem any time you represent two different participants in the same transaction. In this case, you would be involved in software selection, IP, and licensing arrangements both representing your own interests as an open source developer, and your employer's interests as a possible user of the software. I suggest writing up the ...


2

You should discuss your plan with your manager. Regardless of the legality or ethical issues of your question, you should make your manager aware of the full scope of work needed to complete the effort and your plan to accomplish it. Additionally, the relevance of the software to your work is sufficient to give your employer a legitimate interest in your ...


21

As a manager, this would be a non-starter if an engineer approached me with this idea. The conversation might go like this: Me: How's that new project I assigned to you going? Dev: I don't have all the code needed to complete the task. Me: Well obviously, because if we had it, I would not have asked you to devise a solution and build it. ...


3

I had been in a similar situation; my main concern was actually that if I am using my open source (or personal) libraries and I use these at work, I would actually debug them. Let's say somethings doesn't work, you debug it in the office, and actually find out that it is a bug in your SDK/Library/Framework - should you fix the bug and re-submit it to ...


5

I would suggest not doing this without discussing it with your manager/lead and taking approval for the same. I have been asked by my employer to integrate our software with a third party service Were you asked to write a separate component for this? Is there a timeline associated with the delivery that the company is choosing? Would you have been ...


2

It’s a small world; too small to make enemies. M probably has not yet learned that lesson. In your new position you’ll be perceived as having the authority to change vendors if your current vendor delivers poor service or behaves in a hostile way. Ignore this M guy until you have your new position. There’s nothing you can do to change his personality. And,...


1

"I hired this lady to help me start with a project" .... "she considers herself as a co-founder of the company" Well that's solved then. As co-founder she has access to the bank accounts and can pay herself whatever your Board of Directors will allow. "I'm willing to pay her small bonus out of my own pocket" ... ok, but did you really make a mistake? ...


0

I think the issue with being "factual" in this case is that your boss will likely call a meeting to gather everyone to figure it out. Imagine presenting these findings right in front of the person you know who did it? Since your objective is to be discrete, I think this method will backfire. With that said, I would call your boss over for a private meeting ...


18

Any ideas how should I handle this? Unless she has some sort of legal claim, essentially a contract that grants her XXXXXX, you should completely ignore this. Do not respond to her further. If she goes through the expense of obtaining legal council, then and only then, engage a lawyer on your behalf. Also, paying her when you don't have to might make ...


0

Unlike what others have said I think in this case you have to report what you have heard because there are one of two things likely going on and neither of them are good. Either you are being targeted specifically or the IT team is not able to track down the issue and most of not all of your co-workers are being impacted and not able to work at full ...


21

I think this a bit more serious than you understand. Let me try to give you an analogy. You're a cook in a large kitchen. Every once in awhile, you can't cook potatoes because the oven doesn't work - and you just found out that the reason is because another chef is tinkering around the electric transformer for the city block during their breaks. ...


12

Just stay factual, do not put blame on anyone. Report what happend: you cannot make your deadlines, because the WLAN breaks down too often. Make sure you have recorded when this happens and why that's a problem for you. Then let whoever's job it is take the problem from there. Maybe your coworker will be found out. Maybe they'll stop if they know somebody ...


2

Maybe don't broadly expose what you've found, but you should consider raising a concern to your manager and confronting your colleague. Security is a serious issue regardless of domain. If you would report someone compromising the physical security of your firm (maybe damaging locks or copying keys) then you should feel similarly about cyber security. A ...


2

If you don't feel comfortable exposing him directly, at a minimum I'd bring to the boss's attention the method that's being used. If you can point it out without implementing him directly, do it. At that point, it's certainly possible an investigation would be done that would then lead to him.


0

While the top voted answer is absolutely correct and right thing to do, knowing how things work in India (not everywhere but at the companies where "bosses" match the description you gave), I just do not think it will work in your case. 1) You can leave the job as others have rightly described it as 'malpractice' or 'sweat-shop'. There are plenty of other ...


0

As well as the other aspects that have been mentioned it should be pointed out that this is likely to be regarded as fraud. I used to work for an american company although based in the UK and they were constant reminders that our time sheets were reflected in the company balance sheet and therefore it was imperative that they were accurate and honest. There ...


14

'M' is worried, and he should be as you are going to be in a position of authority over him! Here are a few ideas:- Early on in the new job I would share some of your experiences with M with your new boss and indicate that he might be an issue that needs resolved. Make sure you keep a good record of all interaction going forward and when you start the new ...


4

Didn't happen to get anything from him in an email, did you? Without something in writing threatening you, not much you can do. Complaining to the CEO without something more than your word against his will likely be turned around on you. You'll just have to manage him. Play politics, and watch yourself around him. Don't give him a reason to find ...


0

Having lived in Germany for much of my adult life, and then in China, I find this question extremely interesting. One bit of scientific knowledge can be turned into an amazingly lucrative industry in the PRC. China has a family-oriented and strongly nationalistic society. Gaining technical know-how overseas can lead to incredible rewards at home. ...


0

It depends. If you are joining the National Guard or the U.S. Army Reserves, you will be protected by federal law from prejudice and mistreatment by any employer. Still, you may not want to give the perception of having misled your employer. That said, you may not want to tell them that you might be gone, perhaps even out of the country, at the discretion ...


3

However all staff were told to continue as normal. I would suggest that, when in doubt, consult with your manager what to do. If you are not clear how to handle this information with clients, approach your manager and ask. However, seems clear to me that they asked all of you to "continue as normal". That implies that you should make as if the closing will ...


2

From my own experience, this is your employer doing something unethical and dishonest. There are laws in the USA that protect "whistle blowers" from backlash, but you'll have to research that in your own location. Also, this only protects a person if they go to the authorities, rather than the public. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/...


6

This isn't something we can answer for you, since it's really just about two competing concepts: The logistical, bottom-line financial perspective. This would tell you to tell the customers nothing. Because doing so would cause the company problems, and likely cause employees problems as well. Your guilt/responsibility about possibly costing the customers ...


3

Don't inform the clients, you gain nothing by doing so. Your company has asked you not to say anything so by saying something to the clients you risk your own job ( while you still have one ) at this company. This means you may lose out on salary, benefits, and possibly a severance ( if you stay until the end ) when the company closes down. This is not ...


7

Your first responsibility is to your company not the customers. Imagine if you told all the customers now, they would obviously start jumping ship. This would as you would expect drain money from the company. This could cause the company to close up shop faster thus putting you all out on the street before you had a chance to secure new jobs. My advice ...


-2

Good for you. If telling your employer will lead to a promotion and more work then step forward. If you think telling will get you fired while someone else runs your script then keep your mouth shut. I’d look for another full time job and collect two paychecks. If your child is young and you want to spend the time at home, make sure you have six months ...


2

The real question is: how will your girlfriend's life change after she completes her specialisation? That should be the starting point of any consideration on her circumstances. In any case: Italy has very strong unions. Other countries don't have this luck. Your friends should be talking to a union representative. And... 70 hours per week are uncommon. In ...


17

Do you work with your girlfriend in the same job or at the same company. If not, don’t get involved. Your job is to listen, let her vent and make her feel better. You should not be pressuring her to act or do things she might not want to do. You are creating more stress. Buy some wine. Clean the bathroom. Make a nice meal. Give her a massage


6

This seems a straight forward case to form some sort of local worker representation inside the institution, or join a regional or national union and put pressure on management. Such misuse seems pretty common in the health care sector. Since there was already a chance for higher management to properly clean up their institution it seems it is one of the ...


2

I'm assuming that your girlfriend otherwise loves her job and the people she's working with (and for) and wishes to remain working there if at all possible. Your girlfriend should reconnect with the same manager who dealt with the whistleblowing report and say that the desired outcome did not happen to satisfaction. Out of your new meeting, you need to ...


-1

Quietly look for another job and move amicably I am thinking about another anonymous whistleblow that could force the boss to change things. If the first one hasn't changed things, I doubt another one will change it either. Sadly, at times, the upper management doesn't care about the ground level issues, as long as the business is running. The best move ...


2

Didn't you answer your own question? As a result, my team has shown a lot of appreciation to me, the higher ups have noticed and given me lots of recognition, and I even received a couple of small bonuses for my work. The allowable thing to do is accomplish the work assigned to you. The "right" thing is to do as you're doing, assuming you're doing it ...


4

You've given us some clues as to what's going on here. You say that other devs, including seniors, give you work to do when they fall behind. You mention that you've gotten praise from the other devs, including higher ups for the quality of your work. You have earned the "right" to work on complex issues. This is not a 100% guaranteed analysis, just what ...


3

Research has shown that the "performance difference" between the high and low end of a job grade or salary band can be as much as an order of magnitude. Typically when you're at the high end of your band, performance-wise, that you're due for a promotion if you have the next high band worth of skills. That's the background. The short answer is that you do ...


11

The "right thing to do" is to take the time you need to do your tasks in a complete and sustainable way. This means that you don't stay till 10pm every night trying to get more and more done - this is unsustainable, you'll burn out and your company will lose you which is bad for you both. It also means that you don't say "wow, there's 6 hours left on this ...


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