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0

Of course you keep interviewing. One bad interaction should not sway you in any decision you make in life. That doesn't mean you have to give people hundreds of passes, or even two. But everyone has an off day. In passing up this opportunity, you are also limiting yourself to interview experience. Perhaps your next interview will be similarly awful - or ...


-2

You're lucky you're only at the introductory stage of the interview when you had this interaction. DON'T WALK, RUN. I can't make it clearer than that. So, you went to a convention for women and were referred despite being a man. The point is, regardless of your gender, you were impressive enough that the recruiters at the conference thought you would be a ...


0

It depends on how valuable the opportunity you'd be giving up is. So, you spoke to a couple of people at the company who impressed you favorably, and one who treated you somewhat badly. Most likely, from the sounds of things, you wouldn't be interacting with any of them regularly as part of your job if you did get a position. So... overall, maybe not a ...


1

If I've got this right, the recruiters that you're considering talking to are the original people who impressed you at the company's booth. I'd recommend pushing past the disappointing behavioral interview and expressing continued interest in the original positions that were discussed. If it comes up, you could mention that the behavioral interview presented ...


21

I feel it is my duty to pose a situational challenge to this question. You are entirely out of line: You are paying more attention to your colleagues duties than your own. You are eavesdropping on office conversations which are none of your business. You are spending office hours concerning yourself with others' personal matters. You are exposing your ...


13

While I don't disagree with most of the current answers, I think they all miss the crux of the question's 2 critical points: It's never an employee's responsibility to tell off a coworker. This is management's responsibility. If you take it upon yourself to tell off your coworker, you're opening yourself to potential problems. At a minimum, you've made an ...


7

asking our supervisor to buy an XBox X Series console at a black Friday sale for him, at regular working hours. I assume you mean, he's asking the supervisor to buy it with company funds, and get it for employees to use. What's wrong with that? Companies often buy games for employees to use in breakrooms. Game consoles are especially common. Would your ...


31

Ask yourself these three questions (context taken from your narrative): Is being talkative a problem? Are they disturbing you / others from getting their work done? Are they speaking in loud voices? Are they arguing all the time? Are they disrupting the concentration and focus needed for work? Is being friendly a problem? Are they violating the personal ...


100

"I don't want us to trouble our Supervisor." Your Supervisor can speak up for himself. Could be that the supervisor asked, "what would help team morale? I have a budget from the company for this" and your co-worker said, the x-box. I probably would have asked for a hot mocha latte with whipped cream. I'd leave it alone.


19

Is it my responsibility to tell a team member off whom I think is crossing the line No. From what you describe here, it's hard to say if your team member's behavior is appropriate or not. For the sake of discussion let's assume that it is. Unfortunately people who behave inappropriately have little of the self-awareness necessary to listen to or take advice....


0

There are, as you suspect, some benefits and some drawbacks to this strategy. Benefits include less time spent in arguing, unwanted small talks, and other unpleasant social interactions. You may have more time to focus and work if you have a lesser number of people accustomed to working or socializing with you regularly. If the ones you block out are a ...


1

How was anyone at the sister division supposed to know that you even wanted to change jobs? Secondly, it might be unethical or damage relationships between managers for them to try and poach you from your current job. It's not unusual for people to get jobs based on connections. Even if they let you apply for the job they could then find any of 100 reasons ...


1

Public position announcements (and tenders) are a good thing, but there are always ways around them. Anecdote: the gov't of some country issued an invitation to tender for politicians' (chauffeured) cars, where they specified wheel base at least this much, weight at most this much and something about the engine, fuel efficiency, etc. As a result, only a ...


13

No offence, but this seems like sour grapes. You did some good work for free which convinced them they need to fill a position, but they didn't quietly offer it to you. There may be many reasons for this including thinking that they're taking your valuable time. But you've reached the conclusion it's nepotism and are listing the candidates shortcomings in ...


9

Some good answers here already, but I wanted to touch on a couple of extra points. The combination of "aircraft parts" and "FEA software" is particularly concerning. For those unfamiliar with it, FEA is a tool commonly used for analysing stresses in structures e.g. machine parts. (It has other applications, but that's the most obvious one ...


4

You are his team lead and he lied to you. There are suspicion that employee uses enterprise resource to his own without approval because he lied. The company resources used are affordable. Cloud training is expensive and employees with hand-on cloud experience are usually effective. There are some risks since cloud usage can generate surge that are ...


-6

It is unfortunate that you are in this situation. A company which has any respect for their employees would not put them in this position. Many companies do not have the budget to buy every bit of flash any random employee may request, but there is no reason to not provide the tools necessary to perform the job. I have worked with companies which could (...


2

Since I arrived here almost 2 years ago, we have been using cracked softwares to do most of our technical tasks (CAD, simulation, calculation, etc...) which is basically everything we're doing. Let me ask you an honest question... is this your first gig? I ask because it is surprisingly common for these sort of companies to use cracked software. As a matter ...


2

My boss makes me using cracked software. What should be my position? You mentioned that there are open source alternatives, start using those and stop using the cracked software. As long as they produce a usable output, don't worry about your colleagues' or boss' acceptance. The last thing you want is to be complicit in using cracked software. You have ...


49

A wolf remains a wolf, even if he has not eaten your sheep. Your CEO has demonstrated a clear lack of respect for ethics and the law, just because he hasn't gotten around to screwing you over doesn't mean he won't do so if the opportunity arises. Document everything. Update your resume Move on to other employment See a lawyer **Now as to your specific ...


22

Cracked software has two different issues: The (lack of) license, which depending on your location could be illegal and hence open your company to legal processes and damages. The unknown provenance of the software you are using, which means various types of malware could have been introduced to your systems - which could also open your company to legal ...


0

Do what you're told. If you're told to use cracked software, then use cracked software. If you're told not to buy licenses, then don't buy licenses. You're an engineer, not a lawyer, and the legal aspects are not your problem. Your responsibility begins and ends when you tell your manager (not even the CEO, just your manager) "hey, we probably ...


2

I never really managed anybody myself, but I think what I would do in this case, as the manager of this person, is giving him one last chance to explain himself. I would do this by planning a meeting with him, explain my findings and suspicions, and wait for his answer and explanation. In case of normal use, it wouldn't need to go much further than that, I ...


1

The simplest way to approach it is to take an interest in what is being done. As a lead it is not unusual to be engaged in what developers are doing in general, for example in order to share knowledge between team members and increase the teams resilience. Frame it as an opportunity for praise for the developer doing company work outside of company time! (...


10

You have multiple unknown factors: You don't know what the colleague and their boss might have discussed about an upcoming requirement, for which they might be doing a PoC. You don't know whether any separate work allocation was made to that person for carrying out some work other than the "official" (i.e., known to the team) work. You don't know ...


0

If other people got promoted, they may have provided more business value than you above their salary. You may have delivered value to the business on par with your salary. You may already be well paid(I don't know) and you have delivered exactly the value typical of you salary level. BTW I am speculating because I don't know your salary, what I do know is ...


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