New answers tagged

8

What are ways to held these guys accountable & make them take ownership? Those are two different issues that are connected. You are the person that can hold them accountable. They cannot hold themselves accountable. That is not how this works. So it is up to you, to take action when they fail a task. For example you expected feedback, they did not ...


7

I do not want to change the work culture You may not want to change the work culture, but you need to change the work culture. You have inherited a team which is not doing their job. I'm sure it's very fun for them to sit around, chat, have a nice laugh and maybe watch a few videos on YouTube, and I'm sure your team like it - I'd quite like it if I could ...


5

I'm fortunate that my manager is a thoughtful one and has told me multiple times in the past that I essentially don't ever have to be stuck on projects I don't want to be stuck on or take on work I don't want. If your manager has actually told you that you don't have to take on any work that you don't want, then you simply have to convey the type of work ...


1

I don't think there's anything wrong with declining to work on a project because of your own moral compass - as long as you're willing to accept any consequences, which it sounds like you are. I'm fortunate that my manager is a thoughtful one and has told me multiple times in the past that I essentially don't ever have to be stuck on projects I don't want ...


-9

Compromise your ethics only enough to work on the project short term. Then, do it again. Then, do it again. Keep doing it until the project is completed.


4

I believe requesting to change projects is perfectly valid given the circumstances you present: you have experience working on demotivating projects, you raise concerns about your ability to remain motivated, and the project is objectively possibly ethicaly problematic, so in my book it's fine to ask. Bonus points since you're willing to compromise short ...


1

I recommend doing a bit of self-examination. Is it possible that your resistance is coming from unconscious bias? When I recruited, I took the Harvard Implicit Bias tests to increase my self-awareness about my biases. You can learn more about that here: https://www.avidcareerist.com/2013/07/14/examples-employment-discrimination/. Doing so helped me check ...


1

Networks build themselves over trust and necessity. So you build them by being professional and easy to work with and gaining peoples trust as a pro. Freelancing with the intent of taking your companies clients isn't a great idea, at least not overtly. It's called poaching and gives you a bad reputation. Having said that most of my early freelancing clients ...


1

I would recommend working on building your freelancing position as you are also working for your current employers. Even though you are not liking it here, you are still learning new skills and constantly adding to your portfolio. When you are sure you want to continue on with freelancing, you can ask your employees/employer for a recommendation letter. Most ...


-1

What your company is doing, as others have said, is "probably" illegal. If they have a different hiring bar for people depending on their skin color and gender, that's pretty much textbook discrimination. However, advocacy in favor of "the majority" (straight white males) is epically frowned upon in tech in the USA these days; if you ...


2

The classic novel Anna Karenina begins with the famous quote that "All happy families are alike; each unhappy family is unhappy in its own way". I think this applies to your question: it's nearly impossible to answer the question of whether this is "normal", because when these sort of situations go very wrong, they largely do so in unique ...


9

All of this was fairly evident with your other question. All the signs were there clearly. As to if this is normal, just look at all the many, MANY times that I have posted "HR IS NOT YOUR FRIEND" There is a reason that Scott Adams made "Catbert" head of HR. He picked a cat because cats like to toy with their prey before killing them. ...


25

I know that HR is supposed to protect a company and, in this case, getting rid of X was the correct action to pursue this goal, but: is such a level of Machiavellian machination a standard for HR? Can I do something to prevent them doing this against me in the future? But they didn't protect the company. If X finds out HR lied; that HR retaliated by making ...


3

I know that HR is supposed to protect a company ... but: is such a level of Machiavellian machination a standard for HR? I got lost with M and X and the specifics of what happened; but broadly speaking: yes. HR are there to protect the company, and if they need to indulge in a little (legal) skulduggery to achieve that end, they will normally not hesitate ...


-1

It's a good thing you feel icky about it, as making hiring decisions based on race and sex is racism and sexism, and is just as illegal as if you were excluding Indian men, black women, etc. There are people who will tell you that racism can only be done by white people against other races or sexism can only be done by men against women. This is a dangerous ...


1

I would suggest simply mentioning that "Code has been peer reviewed by XXX" (including full contact information) This implies that you have had more experienced eyes looking at what you did, and give you feedback on your solution, but that you did the work yourself! You might want to elaborate on what the feedback was, so that they know what ...


9

Many companies are pushing for equality in the workplace, which I think is great.. However, I can't deny that I feel morally icky about leaving a qualified candidate in the candidacy pool because of what essentially comes down to their gender and skin color. I agree with you on both points - Equality is wonderful and employment free from discrimination is ...


3

I can't deny that I feel morally icky about leaving a qualified candidate in the candidacy pool because of what essentially comes down to their gender and skin color. That is downright racism/sexism right there. Now, I don't know your financial situation so I wouldn't necessarily advise you to leave/risk getting let go of. However if you do wish to bring it ...


2

Your clients decide who they want to hire. If someone is qualified for the position but doesn't fall into the class of people your client wants to hire, you should be free to tell them "I am very sorry; you were technically qualified for the position, but we have a policy of not hiring straight white males / black lesbian woman / whatever applies". ...


2

If you have collected proof of racial discrimination, this is illegal, and if that ease your conciousness, well, of course you can whistleblow it. In absence of material proof, your options, while keeping the job, are limited. You can apply various degrees of resistance to your management. Be aware that it can dangerous and ineffective, though. Ultimately, ...


-7

So if I walk into a store and tell the clerk that I want to buy a book about gardening it's the clerk's job to feel "icky" that I'm not buying books about grilling steaks. Even tho that clerk doesn't know whether I already have 300 books about grilling and my own cattle farm. A lot of tech companies have a high percentage of white developers. If ...


5

Send them both. Then tell them you had a code review done by colleague that knew the subject and implemented his/her suggestions.


4

TLDR: Advertise your candidates of all backgrounds as good as possible Preamble: As this seems a bit unclear and differently interpreted, I read the question such that the white males are filtered out before even looking at their profile and as such without basing the decision in any way on their qualification but just their skin colour/ethnicity. Your job ...


3

This is difficult to answer as I understand where you are coming from and have seen it in places before. One recommendation that I believe would solve your problem would be: Reccomend pushing to not do in-person interviews if possible. Ask that all interviews should be conducted virtually over the phone without video. This forces all interviews to be judged ...


0

Don't be a hero. Real life is not a Hollywood movie, all you can "accomplish" is to be fired. If you really feel strongly about this you can consider donating to political parties/causes that align with your beliefs (to ease your "guilt"), or try to find a similar job in another company that just happens to not have the same ...


1

Is this unethical? No, it is not unethical. The company provided you with a task without specific instructions (this is what I get from your question). You do your best to succeed with that task. In real life, people go to SO, friends, forums, church to get an answer to their coding problems, so no surprise you use whatever you can in that case. Now - and ...


16

Factors other than qualifications are considered in hiring all. the. time. Normally it's something companies like to call "the cultural fit" and in most situations it favors people from "the majority". Also, while hiring, getting someone who is qualified (i.e. has the hard skills necessary to do the job) is just one of the goals. There ...


11

An answer to this is difficult and depends on the company, country and whether it does actually have an effect on the company. If you still fill all positions with qualified candidates in time, then there is no problem, at least from the perspective of the company. You have a position, you get someone diverse to fill it, case closed. Whether there are still ...


34

@hk88 I applaud you for having human decency left to feel "icky" about those things. You are right to feel "icky": these practices are outright illegal and violate federal equal opportunity laws, but the activists in power who push such agenda do not seem to care (and in a blue state chances are courts don't care either). As to what you ...


16

Have candidates to put black on their profiles or other gender in their things. I was in technical recruiting for my firm and my team found some people we really wanted to move through the HR politically correct quagmire. We found the way to do it was to tell them to just lie on the profiles. The creatures in HR got to meet their diversity quota and my team ...


61

First, there is no such thing as a diverse candidate. A person is not diverse. A team may be more diverse if it hires a candidate that is different from its current members in one or more ways, and the team may well be improved by becoming more diverse. When you call a person diverse, you other them, and you ignore the genuine benefits their differences ...


-4

I have never worked for a company where anyone meaningfully checked the quality of the hires after they were hired. But having increased diversity looks good on the resume so that is what I did. At my company the last time we had a diversity push I just chose less important positions and filled them with the first blacks we could find who applied and was ...


7

Ignore it/use it to your benefit as best you can and focus on acquiring power in your career. Organizational change doesn't happen from people on the lowest rung of the ladder. I suspect that you are facing a managerial target to increase diversity and the simplest way to do that is just to throw out all candidates that do not fit that profile. I have HR ...


-1

I really need this job right now and don't want to be fired So mind your own business and do your work.


4

I do not intend to disclose the fact that I received help from a close friend. I can only see two reasons not to disclose this fact. One is that you know in your heart that you were cheating. The other is that you know in your heart the prospective employer should be looking to hire your close friend rather than you. Most colleges require that students sign ...


2

I have sent my solution to a close friend of mine You will not be able to do that when you start working (i.e. share your work with a friend who is not known to the company), so yes it is unethical and can be illegal if you do it when you are employee of the company. If you would have just asked a query to your friend that would have been okay because it is ...


3

Ethical conforming to accepted standards of conduct. Merriam-Webster It is not standard or accepted conduct in the tech industry to let someone else take your interview/job placement test(s) for you or to help you. Unless they are actually the person administrating the test. Furthermore, should you be given the job you will lack the confidence to complete ...


136

One useful test for ethics questions is "If everyone with an interest in this issue knew exactly what I am doing, would they act differently or think less of me?" By that test, you answered your own question when you wrote "I do not intend to disclose the fact that I received help from a close friend." If you really thought it was ethical,...


32

Yes, it's unethical. When I test someone, I want to know how they think more than how right they are. I gave a technical interview once where the guy couldn't answer any of my (deliberately difficult) questions. We hired him, because he gave HONEST answers. Technical deficiencies can always be addressed through training/education and are not deal breakers ...


14

I think it's a grey area. If they did the work for you, would be unethical. If they did part of it for you, it would be unethical. You doing it all and after it's done getting suggestions on how to improve it? Assuming you do the improvements yourself and don't have them done by them, I'd say that's very borderline okay-ish. I mean it's what we do. We work ...


0

Is this unethical? Maybe, but not necessarily. Firstly, it is you that is being interviewed for this job, not your friend. Unless your friend is going to be willing to do your work for you when you get the job, you should present your work without his input. The company is trying to assess you, not someone else. However, unless the instructions with the ...


43

Is this unethical? The short answer is: Yes You would be able to do your own research, so Google, use other sources (textbooks) for your task. To ask someone to edit your work for you means it is not your own work. After all the employer is paying for your expertise, and what you can bring to the organisation. I would suspect you would not be the only ...


0

Leave Them Alone How quickly do you expect someone to jump onto LinkedIn to declare to the world they were fired when you fire them? Especially when it's harder to get a job when you're out of a job? (And especially when not everyone uses LinkedIn all that frequently?) Is your absolute first priority when you get dumped to go update your relationship ...


2

I'm going to go against the common theme in the answers so far. You absolutely did the right thing; Respect is not just something you show when the person in question is witness to it, it includes how you talk about that person with others. The instance you describe was definitely disrespect as your colleague referred to another colleague as a child (it ...


3

Tjeez, is that a thing in the united states nowadays, in addition to managers, peers have to evaluate each other as well? And these evaluations go in such detail that you are encouraged to find little things about each other to rat on? Don't see how that fosters a nice working environment. But anyway, back to your question. Yes, it is (slightly) ...


10

You are right, it's not nice to call a grown woman "girl". It's not respectful. Technically, you are right to put it in there. However, you should think about whether that is the world you want to live in: where every little one-time occurrence of going against the rules is immediately written down and filed with HR. You said yourself, the person ...


2

While this isn't as broad of a comprehensive research-backed framework as you've indicated would be ideal in an answer, here's something that may be a helpful resource in the absence of something more total: the online survey company SurveyMonkey (with which I have no affiliation) recently published a library of survey templates "so that leaders and HR ...


6

Full disclosure: I fit into several "diversity" groups myself. First, check and see if you don't already have it. Many people, especially those of us who are older, don't advertise some traits that fall under the "diversity" umbrella. LGBTQ people were usually "in the closet", as back in the day being "out" was far ...


2

Diversity is hard to come by I run a similarly-sized engineering organization in Colorado (a not very diverse state in general). Finding diverse talent, let alone attracting it, is extremely difficult. We've looked at a number of factors in our recruitment targets with respect to 4 year universities and our investment in contacts surrounding those events. We'...


0

The answer here is so simple, I'm surprised no one mentioned it yet. You attract top talent (of any race, creed, gender) by providing top compensation. For example, the pool of black women who have PHDs in computer science is exceedingly small. I imagine Google has a few of them on their staff but your company doesn't have any. Why do you think that's the ...


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