New answers tagged

0

When there's no work for you, there's a fair chance that you'll be made redundant, so use this time to prepare. Get your finances in shape, so you can handle a few months of job hunting. Get in touch with old colleagues and have a look at the job-boards to see what the market is like, and which skills are in demand. Make sure you're up to date, and learn ...


1

Build two lists List 1: things you want to do List 2: things that you think will add value to your group Walk to your manager and say, “I’ve got some bandwidth and I want to check with you if you have something for me, if not, I can do any of these...” Items that appear on both list 1 and list 2 Items that appear on list 1 Items that appear on list 2 ...


0

There are plenty of things you could do, some on your own initiative, and some in consultation with others such as your supervisor. Rather than staying strictly at the electrical and board design level, become involved in the product firmware as well. Having a strict division of roles there can be an impediment to progress anyway, so being able to exercise ...


2

Get proactive: Look at the technology and the product road map. If there isn't one, help creating one Actively look around for new technologies, new parts or new vendors that are relevant to your business and/or products Get a bunch of eval board, bring them up and do some performance measurements or some cool demo of what may be possible with the stuff ...


2

Question: What should I do? Question here is: Is there no technical / hands-on work for the company / department as a whole, or there are assignments but you're not assigned one? Either way, given your situation that you already tried the below: Informing your superiors about the problem you're facing with the nature of work assigned to you Learning ...


4

You are saying it was not in any contract you signed. I job advert is not part of the contract. Even if it was in the job advert, any court would just laugh at the company making that claim. So you keep hold tightly of the original appointment letter, you inform them as politely as you can that a job advert is never part of an employment contract, and ...


2

You don't mention if this is on the job training, or a professional qualification / training that the company is providing to perform your role. I'll assume it's a professional set of training they are offering. In my experience it is common for a company to include a form of reimbursement clause when they offer expensive training, the reason for this is ...


4

It doesn't matter what the original advert said. That's only an opening point in negotiations. You successfully negotiated away that repayment clause, as proven by the signed contract. The new company presumably buys your current company as a whole, including all assets and contracts. That would include your employment contract, as signed. It is almost ...


2

I'll put to one side the issue as to whether this is an appropriate way for a company to raise this issue. There are a number of ways. In my experience this is quite common however only in the instance of the company forking out for paid training. i.e. I don't believe it's reasonable that they can arbitrarily set a figure of £13k for "on the job training" ...


4

In the end of the day you accepted the job in the first place, so in terms of the salary you can either attempt to negotiate a higher salary or quit. The company doesn't own you. It doesn't really matter if they lied about the reasons for the low salary in the first place, you accepted it, though its obviously a huge red flag on their ethical standings. It'...


4

You can stop working extra hours for free. Tell them you'll either do it during the time you're paid, or as paid overtime. They'll have to pay someone, and you're probably still the cheapest and most experienced person they can find. You're probably worried that they'll fire you, but that would leave them needing to find someone competent to do your ...


20

Wage theft? So you're not exempt and they didn't pay you for overtime? That's wage theft. Did you keep records? Do you have emails/call logs of them calling you or ordering work when you were off-duty? The Labor Department of your State can usually recover that money, assuming you can prove you did those hours. Negotiate What kind of machinery is ...


0

This can range from completely harmless to very shady. Re-applying knowledge from your education/training resulting in the same product with well-known features and technologies (you are a "person skilled in the art" https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Person_having_ordinary_skill_in_the_art) is no problem Obviously everything which required a collective work of ...


2

I can't stand extremely sensitive information being sent to a regime I don't personally like. What should I do, if anything, about this? You say that you can't stand it, but so far you have. If the regime bothers you enough, you should find a new job and leave this one. Before you decide to look elsewhere, you might wish to make sure that the ...


6

If it was a data transfer from EU to China, there are rules (https://ec.europa.eu/info/law/law-topic/data-protection/international-dimension-data-protection_en) that need to be followed. I assume that similar rules apply for US to China data transfers, but some legal expertise is required to understand if those data transfers are protected by “Privacy ...


-2

This isn't your issue to resolve. If they're handling sensitive data there are mandated procedures legislated to do it by. And it would be audited regularly. If you don't trust the auditors, your company and the authorities then you should look at moving on. If you have ambitions of crashing your career and other risks including perhaps doing it all for ...


12

Interpreting privacy policies is not trivial, so keep an open mind that you might be wrong. At the same time, don't assume malice immediately - they might be willing to address the situation. First stop should be your immediate manager. Share your concern with this person and see what they say. If you are not satisfied with their answers even after ...


27

It sounds like you have identified that there are two questions for you to answer: Is it legal? Is it ethical? With regards to it being legal, you need to consult a lawyer with your contract from your previous employer in hand. Please don't mistake the comments or answers you've received as valid legal advice. Trade secrets are a protected form of IP, and ...


56

What can I do if they still want to do the project anyway? Obviously you cannot reproduce your former company's product line for line. But there's no reason that you cannot build a new product from scratch which has all the same features as the prior product. That's perfectly legal and happens all the time. And now, with your experience, you can build it ...


1

Is your boss preparing to pay you some obscene amount of money? I'm saying that because your old company is not just you. You had a boss, and probably other colleagues in your team doing other footwork to get the entire system setup. Your boss is now asking you, a single person, to re-create the product of a company. Logically, that isn't going to happen. ...


116

I'm not sure things are quite as cut-and-dried as you make them out. To the point where it's possible to proceed with a modified version of the project without ethical issues. Let me explain with a few examples: "I used to work for a company as an administrator/developer for an Inventory Management System. The new company I'm with want me to ...


8

Is it even legal? It is definitely not ethical to use the business secrets of your previous company while working in the new one. It is perfectly fine to use the general know-how: how to use the programming languages, which tools are better suited for the development (IDE's, debuggers...). About being legal, you need to discuss with a lawyer, because the ...


0

Your culture is sure to have enforcement structures. Use them. I acknowledge that I am an outsider, and I do not know the details of how things work, but it seems that the Jante Loven is all about not putting yourself above your group - not claiming glory for yourself, and so forth. Is this not exactly what your coworker has done? He stood up in front of ...


2

As already answered, due to the fact that the project was written on company time it is their property. Therefore do not post it before you get an approval from your manager. If posting this project would reveal anything that was supposed to stay within the company, or there is a possibility that a competitor could take advantage of it or that code will be ...


4

If you were to do this without getting permission then it's clearly unethical. GSON is a false equivalency - Google developed it then they chose to open source it. If your employer was to chose to open source this then that would be the same thing. I am also giving my project to be used in the company's products (including those which I develop) and ...


12

It's not your code. If you developed it during work time, it belongs to your employer, not you. You cannot legally open source it. Your employer can, but not you. If you think it should be open sourced, you should talk to your manager about it, but because you wrote it for them, it's their call, not yours. The answer to your main question: it's not one ...


-1

tl;dr Don't talk to your boss. Don't take the lead on this. Support your coworker if they do in an act of solidarity. It's absolutely important to show solidarity with our coworkers when it comes to issues with management prejudice, along with other social issues that can occur when there is a power imbalance. It's also important to recognize that just ...


2

People react to different things in different ways. People also make the mistake of thinking that people with some similarities share more traits than they actually do. Combine the two and you have your present situation. Of the three of you, it seems that you are taking the incident most to heart. So, you have at least three different viewpoints here. ...


0

So, John says it's not your problem since you may not know the full story and clem says it might affect you, so you should take to your boss. What about the middle way? Go to the boss to discuss it and not mentioning Morgan? Let the boss raise the topic of Morgan if he wants to, but only discuss your own concerns.


11

While I get where it comes from, I disagree with the previous answer saying that you should keep everything to yourself. Morgan might not want you to get in their case, but your worries are that it might happen to you. From your post, I gather that you do not share the same manager as them. Then, approach your manager and make it about you. Mention that ...


7

Sounds like it is Morgan's problem not yours. You may not know the whole story so you should probably keep your nose out of it no matter how well intentioned you are. If you don't like that advice: At least talk to Morgan before getting involved. Morgan may not want you involved. < edit > I've re read the question and all of the other answers. I think ...


0

Could it be a prank or other manipulation rather than a genuine firing? It's a "out of left field" answer, but I would suggest you consider whether this could be a prank, or a sort of 'hazing ritual', or a set-up by a rival, rather than a genuine firing process. Maybe something that happens to all new people (or maybe it's just you!). On the surface of it, ...


2

I'm not a lawyer, but one question that does come to mind is: are you really forbidden from drinking during lunch? I mean, was it conveyed to you in some unequivocal, official company manner, for example, a guidebook, a new workers orientation day or, worse for your case, in the contract? Again, no lawyer, but if the answer is no and is genuine, or it's ...


8

I have to admit that I might be off on a weird limb on this one, but I'd say, 'Duty's an awfully strong word, but, yes: you have a bit of a moral incentive to put your thumb on the good side of the scale and not simply ignore the situation.' Don't get me wrong - I'm not saying to go to Person X at all - I think that would probably be a bad idea. I'm saying ...


1

Yes, this practice is unprofessional. No, you do not have duty to person X as a fellow colleague. Unless you are in HR or manage this person you do not have a responsibility towards person X to defend them. If you feel the person in question is being maligned, you might want to have a quiet word with the person who being informed about your experiences ...


32

Whenever you are denied compensation which you believe that you have earned, you need to consult a lawyer in your jurisdiction. Even though you did break a rule, and were terminated, that might not preclude you from your commissions. The story, as you said it, is very sketchy. The fact that your manager bought you the drinks, which got you fired ...


8

Is being singled out for termination, and losing commissions to the manager for drinking at lunch with the manager and co-workers ethical? It's probably not very nice and not very ethical, assuming you were intentionally singled out as you wrote. But if you are prohibited from drinking during work and you did it anyway, it's probably within their rights ...


2

Unfortunately you do not say which country you are in and this is important information in determining your best course of action. My background is that I have lead many Software development teams in the US and Europe and also lead hybrid onshore-offshore teams in Eastern Europe and Asia. When suffering from stress, it can be difficult to deal with ...


2

You can’t prove it was him, but you believe it is? If so, then you should also believe you don’t want to work with him. Other answers say why. In such a situation, I would respond. “Someone called me without caller ID and claimed to be ___. I believe it was him by the voice, but can’t prove it. He said he did not want to work with me, and therefore, ...


1

I think it is quite possible that he is truthful and genuinely assumes he could not work with you. He may have called you personally because it seemed to him to be the most honest solution. Normally, he would need to make up some excuse for his superior, and make sure you can not sue the company. You would not find out what was going on, but get some generic ...


-4

Starting off any kind of relationship with lies, untruths, or withholding information can only lead to problems. If you take the job without being up front with your new boss then you can not expect them to fully trust you. Would you trust them if you knew they were not being forthright about everything? If you don't tell your new boss about this co-...


-9

Sign the contract first and then contact the manager as others have suggested and ask to be bought out. Enjoy three months of paid vacation. Unless you get an exceptionally good response from the manager you don't want to work for this company.


20

Don't be too quick to turn away the job because of this interaction. You were offered the job by the hiring manager. You received that call from a future coworker (assumed to be subordinate to that manager). If you let this guy scare you off, you're effectively letting him overrule his manager. The manager makes these sorts of decisions for a reason. ...


3

Apart from people who are close to you, the truth is that nobody really cares about your personal matters. The rules of information say that you need to communicate what others need to know. They are wondering why you left the meeting. Let them know (chat, email to all, at lunch, whatever the common method of sending non-critical information to everyone is ...


4

I think it depends how badly you want the job. Your teammate should not have contacted you like that, and what was the point!? He should have talked to the manager, not you. I would phone the manager and turn the job down, stating the reasons why you no longer wish to work there. If you desperately need the job you could stay quiet however, this can lead ...


-4

Take notes of exactly what was said and when. What I would not do is report it to the manager or HR. While on the surface, reporting it might seem wise but in reality there are many people who would actually try to blame you. If the offending employee disputed it and denied the whole thing, who do you think they are going to believe? Hint: it won't be the ...


46

Couple of red flags here: How did the "would be" teammate get your personal contact info (unless they had a dedicated copy of your resume which had your contact number)? Even if they had the info, how could they avail that for their "personal" use? If they were against your appointment, why could they not voice that opinion before the interview (especially ...


-9

Take the job. When you start the job, you show this team mate your biggest, fakest smile. And then you do your best to show not only him but also your manager that you are better than him.


193

Note down as much detail as you can recall about the private call, and report it to the manager and HR of the company. Calling potential candidate privately is extremely unprofessional, not mentioning in your case it's actually pretty rude and rather naive. You should reconsider if you still want to be onboard with the company according to their response to ...


4

I recommend: If you do provide reasons, keep them succinct and understandable (e.g. "my so and so has died and I've been really stressed out"), unless they ask about it and you're comfortable sharing more. Don't beat yourself up about things, nor force yourself to try to work really hard. People will understand, and if they don't, you shouldn't care. Take ...


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