New answers tagged

3

I think that you should simply, and somewhat-cryptically, let the couple know that maybe they should take a look in "this particular folder." And let it go at that. And, be discreet. Never tell anyone else. They're a married couple, and they're the business owners. If they want to be kinky, that's their business.


12

The important thing is to be as discreet as possible. It would be best if you could avoid them thinking you know the content of the pictures at all. Hopefully, you stopped viewing them when you realized what the content of one of them was. Depending on the contents of the folder, you may be able to get away with an innocuous email about image files being ...


4

I do not want to look like as if I would do a last spit into the face of the bosses, but I also do not want my ex-colleagues to think, that I was likely fired. So do what everyone that is not fired but leaves on their own accord does: write a friendly mail, thank everybody, tell them how much you appreciate it to have worked there. If you want to be a ...


108

I have run into exactly this issue where I came across some personal files that a coworker had accidentally (I assume) copied to a public folder. I sent my coworker an email and let them know the files were there and that anyone could access them. They were very appreciative and took care of it immediately. Don’t make this more complicated than it has to be. ...


7

I am American, but of German extraction, working for a German company, so I understand the culture, and the business in Germany. Never willingly make an enemy, you never know when you may need him as a friend. Do not worry about what your colleagues think. If they like you, no explanation is needed, if they don't, no explanation is sufficient. So follow the ...


2

If it is not the norm in your (company) culture to mention where you will be going, then you won't find that much positive results if you decide to break with that norm and mention your new job. For those people that know you well enough to know your LinkedIn/Xing profile, the best way to show that nothing disastrous happened is to update your profile with ...


5

No. There is simply no reason to do so. I also do not want my ex-collegues to think, that I was likely fired Stating your next employer does not bring you closer to this goal. As everyone who had quit before you haven't mentioned that, it would only stand out and draw unnecessary attention to your departure. IMHO stating your next employer simply looks bad....


13

I do wonder about the circumstances of your discovery. Is this particular aspect of your job intended to make sure that storage space isn't exhausted or is it to make sure that people aren't engaging in appropriate activities on the company dime? If the former then it doesn't seem like you'd need to open up any of the files. You could just report to a higher ...


8

Should I ask my manager if he could give me an extra rise because of that undeserved negative evaluation? No. Ask your manager to give you an extra rise because of the value you provide to the company. Ask your manager to give you an extra rise because it will bring you into line with what you are worth on the open market. It would look like I'm asking him ...


0

It's a bit late now to do anything. Disappointed, I went to speak to the new manager. He told me Here's your problem, no paper trail. With anything to do with performance or remuneration, you NEED to get a paper trail started from the beginning. Then you at least have something to work with. Do NOT trust or expect anyone else to help you. Sometimes they ...


-5

Top management at my company has decided to set up workshops to think about the future of the company... Those who think about the future are visionaries. A group has been assigned to the select few, and invitations sent, with 10 days notice. The woman was invited to think about the future. ...she could not make the first meeting. She got a nice reply ...


2

I would never try to couch actions in terms of defending any person. I would recommend simply stating my desired outcome: e.g., "Dear Strategy Consultant taking minutes, Please amend the minutes to strike the following sentence: This resistance and disdain can be understood as mistrust of their own abilities to contribute to a long-term reflexion (&...


10

Never attribute to malice that which is adequately explained by stupidity The person making that statement may just have missed or misinterpreted the facts. Or maybe you are the one who did. Start by trying to clarify things with them. Probably through a more "personal" way of communication, such as face to face, or a phone call, or a chat message, ...


1

When should you step in to defend a minority? As a manager you should defend all members of your team whenever anyone makes inappropriate remarks based on race, ethnicity, age, sexual orientation or any other personal characteristics wholly unrelated to the merits of their work or their qualifications for their role I strongly disagree with your comment ...


7

(When) should you step in to defend a minority or otherwise marginalized individual? The same time you'd step in for any other coworker. Let me flip this one on you. I have a hearing impairment, should I, as a hearing impaired individual, step in for a coworker who is bothered by another coworker who is very loud and making noise that is keeping him from ...


5

I fail to see what this has to do with defending "a minority". If you reread the question you asked carefully (and yes I checked the revision history to make sure it wasn't lost in an edit), you will see that nowhere even in your own question did you even make mention of the fact that this person was a minority, except at the very end where you ...


4

Rather than focusing on the specific employee with the pre-approved vacation, I would question the overall legitimacy of a consultant that would draw such a conclusion from someone not being present at a workshop. Remind them that besides pre-approved time off, there are things such as emergencies, being sick,...etc that would prevent an employee from ...


32

I think you are placing too much emphasis on the fact that the employee was a "minority or otherwise marginalized individual", and that is leading you state the following: However, I am wondering if I should step in or not. I am the archetypal white-cis-middle-aged man, and some would say it is not my battle to fight, as no one has done me any ...


8

Let me analyze your quote of the consultant. Some shop-floor workers have not attended the workshop. Stating a fact. This resistance and disdain can be understood as mistrust of their own abilities to contribute to a long-term reflexion ("glass-ceiling") Stating an ideological opinion, which can also turn out to be wrong, as it has not been ...


72

this would be a male manager speaking on behalf on a female shop-floor worker. Absolutely, as a manager you back up your workers regardless of their gender or anything else. You don't let people tread on them, especially if they're not present. I would have answered along the lines of. 'There's only one person not present and they had prearranged leave.' ...


10

I have worked in a situation where companies had a "business partnership", and the expectation was that they didn't "poach" from each other. Obviously, during the work, people would come into contact with specialists with very attractive skill-sets. However, the essence of the no-poaching rule was that you wouldn't approach someone with ...


24

There's also a gentlemen's agreement between me and my employer that if I want to leave, I tell him, so he can make arrangements That one too is not a gentlemen's agreement. It's a rhetorical promise asked under pressure. It's a nice offer, and I don't blame your boss for making it, but it's also a manipulation technique to a degree. Did you really have the ...


139

You don't say where you are so it's hard to take local norms into account, but this "gentleman's agreement" to not poach employees is anti-competitive. It is a way of suppressing wages across the industry - your case being a prime example (you are considering not taking a 20% wage increase). Such agreements are illegal in my country (the UK) and ...


15

Well, your current employer has been good to you, and has offered an open door to discuss these things. So, before you jump ship, go discuss with them. You don't have to name names after all. You can just say that you were approached, and that you were offered a 20% salary increase, and that at this point in your life, that's meaningful. You can then ...


52

You should feel free to take the job. Your biggest responsibility is to your family and it sounds like the increased salary would help. Maintaining a good relationship with your current employer sounds wise. (It's a decent thing to aim for by default. In a small local market, you may benefit in future by maintaining a good reputation.) Offering a longer ...


4

Please let your manager know about this. They have an interest to know of anything that be interfering with your work and productivity. I agree with your concern that such reckless behavior at work is unprofessional and you and fellow colleagues should not have to tolerate such behavior. If you feel comfortable, state plainly and explicitly that you find ...


1

This is a tough situation to be in if you know the colleague well. With the increased social networking aspect of the internet gaining popularity, a lot of people are now unknowingly getting addicted to "echo chambers" on the internet that reinforce their own beliefs. Due to this constant reinforcement - a kind of a feedback-loop where everyone in ...


3

How to deal with workmate's constant promotion of conspiracy theories Ignore those types of messages, pretend they were never sent. You need to only acknowledge and respond to work related messages in the company chat. This individual seems like they are seeking attention and/or reaffirmation of their thoughts. As long as you continue to engage with them ...


0

Sounds like the safest way out of this is for the project to get killed by the client ASAP. If you can allow some other reason for them to do so, to materialize, which cannot possibly be blamed on you, it would cause the least harm to everyone. If you confront your employer (i.e. if they find out you are consulting lawyers, which you should still do just as ...


2

Do I have any obligation to inform the client of what I have discovered about this project? This is really the only question in my opinion. No, you're under no professional obligation. But you've tagged the question 'ethics'. Ethics are a personal thing, but to my mind I see you have a dilemna. The consequences of telling the client are unknown on the ...


14

See an employment lawyer immediately. Your company may be engaging in fraud. Print out a copy of that email and bring it to your lawyer and find out what your rights and responsibilities are from this point forward. Update your resume, and start floating it. They know you saw something you weren't supposed to see. If they're willing to do something ...


1

This is an interesting question. I'm not exactly sure how you would be interacting in an IT department with so many people and so many ranks, that there are groups that are beneficial for you to hangout with and other groups that are negative to you to hang out with. Generally... Professionally, you should be treating all, from the employees on corrective ...


1

You need to set boundaries, but you can do it in a very caring and compassionate way, while giving some advise on executive maturity. "Hey, we had a very productive working relationship, and I value our friendship, and I really don't want you to take this the wrong way or be offended, but, I don't work there anymore. I appreciate you feel you can trust ...


0

Some great answers here already but I’d like to add a few points. Disclosure: I’ve been doing this sort of work for years. It sounds like your team is doing normal software testing when they should be doing proper model testing. Getting every test to work may be achievable but time consuming, but you are setting yourself up for failure when you go live. If ...


0

I'd just like to "blow through the politics" and ask this ... "exactly who are these 'voice assistants' supposed to 'assist?'" Superficially, it seems to me that the engineers' perspective might be: "right on the money!" "High-level managers within the company" – never mind(!) what power they happen to hold – probably ...


3

I would want to better understand the target audience of the voice assistants, what the other test sets are, and how representative the test sets are of the target audience. There are several factors that affect voice assistants and responding to the human voice - age, gender, natively spoken language, and accent (influenced by national origin), among ...


0

"Hey, I'm sorry to tell you this but I can't help you anymore. I really need to enjoy my free time and not think about work at all before I can start again. It might sound selfish to you, but this little break is really important to me and to my health. I hope you understand." If she doesn't understand, cut her off. You don't want a needy friend ...


4

Assuming that your managers are aware their queries are being used for testing, it's clearly not unethical to gather a set of test cases from them and use those as a test set. What you do with the results of that testing might be: If you tell your management team that you have a X% accuracy rate, making it clear that you only tested on their queries, then ...


3

Besides the specific on how to respond this request (I partly agree with Dan's answer), the most important lesson to take home, in my opinion, is the following: As a manager always offer a rationale behind any request. If you don't currently manage people, maybe you will in the future and you will ask stuff to your collaborators very often. It's very ...


5

Can someone tell if my statement is really that offending? No it's not particularly offensive as it stands. He may feel his authority is being questioned, but I don't see it as a big deal. I think you're both overdoing it.


5

Quick side note: managers usually check addresses at the start of the FY (which is usually end of January or November timeframe) and one of their task is to verify the HR address data is correct for their employees. I'm 90% certain this is what your manager is trying to do. Let me first say it's always impolite to ask a question to answer a question. It's ...


-11

The reason is because you referred to him by name without an honorific or by his title. You should have referred to him as Sir John, Boss John, Supervisor John, Superior John, or his title such as Mr. Supervisor or Supervisor. This shows a severe lack of respect for his authority and is very disrespectful.


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