The Stack Overflow podcast is back! Listen to an interview with our new CEO.

Hot answers tagged

179

Go. Or rather: Go if everyone else is going. Do the cleaning. Be part of the team. Have a say in whether things that are yours get thrown out or kept. Have a say on what gets added to the office. Be part of the team. Comparing it to cleaning your apartment isn't fair. Your team doesn't use your apartment. You do use your office. It is two hours. The ...


178

Your manager is not being unreasonable. She asked you to reserve tickets, you reserved tickets, she acquired (and paid for) tickets based on that reservation, and now she expects you to pay for them. That's not an unreasonable position to take. Perhaps she should have double-checked or something, but by the same token, you should have told her once you ...


178

Obviously not everyone is taking the contest seriously because it is so open to abuse. Hell if I was the obese guy and you had a "one size fits all" program why would I take it seriously? At 415 pounds I'm probably not going to run a marathon so how can I compete with the guy who can? At 5 foot and 100 pounds she probably isn't going to benchpress as much ...


119

So my question here is: "Would it be unprofessional to go to a team lunch and not eat anything." I wouldn't specifically label it "unprofessional", but some might. But it would likely be considered odd. Check out the restaurant's menu ahead of time. Find something on the menu you can eat - if not an entree, consider ordering an appetizer, salad or soup. ...


97

Working for a Germany company, I am surprised that you are included in this. Normally, trainees should be exempt from anything that costs private money, because everyone knows they don't earn much money. With 200 people, you are basically guaranteed a free breakfast every day. You could easily be eating as much cake all year as you bring yourself once a ...


58

Pay your boss for the ticket and re-sell it if you are not going to go. By giving your boss $10 to reserve a ticket you essentially told your boss that you intended to attend the game and that it was OK for your boss to purchase a ticket for you. It is not the same as a cruise reservation as a cruise reservation is completely controlled and handled by ...


42

TL;DR Go Long version At my company (~25 people, located in Germany), we're doing this once a year. It usually takes place on a Friday after lunch (during office hours, approximately ~2 hours). It's a lot of fun for everybody involved and a great opportunity for team building. Also, my boss participates himself. Think about it this way: what's the ...


42

Is this legal? If legality is the primary concern, this should be asked in law stack exchange. However, if the question is more about the practice, opening up the calendar to other employees and managers is not unheard of and since you already understand that it's only for the company use, as long as it is visible to only company employees, I do not see a ...


38

Is it better to just award these individuals with far-fetched data and deal with everybody else getting mad at me? No, because then the biggest liar wins. Two wrongs (your predecessor not setting the competition right, and the employees lying) does not make a right. Or is it better to confront these individuals or disqualify them for clearly cheating? ...


32

I don't think it would be particularly problematic. It's certainly not unprofessional. You'd very likely be asked a few questions about it, but if you're not worried about that and have a good response I don't think it's a problem. You can either provide a canned minimalist response, or provide more details, depending on your comfort level. My team ...


29

Let's take a look at the details. Events are not working events. You state in your comments that : I attended the most recent event because it's sort of a big deal for the students. The drive is a bit difficult and as we help with set up, clean up, and running the event, it makes me feel that it is improper to indicate attendance is a sign of ...


24

If the bosses want it, then go with it, and have fun. Just remember that's their castle where they live so behave yourself and don't get too drunk.


22

Is this legal? Why would it not be? You just said it doesn't include anything personal and work related things only. If you're at work and clocked in/supposed to be working, your manager has every right to know where you are at all times never mind your managers manager. They're paying you to do what they require. Managers need to manage their employees ...


21

I'm a UK resident, but previously spent a placement year working in Germany -the particularly traditional Franconia no less - as a placement student, so I can offer you my experience and the observations I made from the other placement students around me. The Select Few: I was fortunate enough to have a relatively small team in my office, and with 10-14 ...


21

Go even if not everyone else is going. If it turns out I'm wrong, going once won't hurt your career, even if you don't get paid for it. You could even leverage a non-productive unpaid office cleaning exercise as an example of why you are in the future as careful about always getting paid as some feel people should be. The people most integrated to the team ...


21

Forget the competition. Corporate environments are competitive enough without pitting people who are already in great shape against people who could actually stand to benefit. The person who organized it is gone and you’re left with a sizable budget to promote health and wellness in the workplace. Use it how you see fit. One idea that comes to mind is to ...


21

Isn't it more logical to use a working day instead? Certainly it makes more sense to do this during the work week, if you actually want people to attend. A company that isn't willing to have an event on company time sends a clear signal that this event isn't important.


19

"But its only a pound, surely you can afford a pound" When I was a teen, I used that same reasoning to a teacher, and she pointed out that she supported a lot of other causes too, and that money added up. That is a completely rational argument, and if someone pushes back on that, it is them being rude. So, simply point out that you support other causes ...


19

I'm not recommending you do this, but it is an option. (I would just call his bluff a if I get fired so be it.) Document the policy Attend all events Unpaid - But document your attendance\time. Once you are ready to move on, find a new job and quit. Once you start your new Job, file a complaint with the department of labor and demand back pay for those ...


17

They are either genuinely nice, or genuinely in need of a good contractor, or quite possibly both. So you should go to that party, enjoy it, get no more than minimally drunk, and expect that someone will talk to you about contracting for the company.


15

If you'd rather your birthday not be celebrated, either don't let the date be known or, if that information has leaked, simply tell folks "I really wish you wouldn't; it makes me uncomfortable." There's nothing offensive about making such a request. You don't have to explain what the issue is, though if you can do so that may help convince people that you're ...


15

Short answer: Unless you plan to run away from it by quitting, you need to face the issue. It will eventually catch up with you the longer you try to avoid it. I don't know if your boss's daughter mentioned the name of the guy she dated, or what you looked like, but the chances are that eventually you will run into her unexpectedly and it will come out ...


14

Perfectly legal and widely used practice, at least in the UK - makes easier for managers to look after your time and schedule meetings. Also, find you in the big offices if there is need.


13

"Sorry I cannot join you, I don't have the budget for it right now." I would be honest and straightforward with my coworkers. Since you say you're quite careful with money, I'm going to assume you have a budget. If the amount you have in your budget for food (or entertainment or whatever you want to classify these outing as) is too small to regularly go on ...


12

As keshlam says, the only way is to actually tell people that you don't want it celebrated. If you don't want to tell everybody, you can talk to your boss and maybe one or two more people that you trust, to make sure they can squash any attempt at celebration as soon as they hear of it (which they will but you might not). You don't need to give a reason ...


12

Correct me if I am assuming wrong but I feel you think cleaning out desks is a janitor's job. And by making you do it, you feel it's free-loading. An office janitor is for cleaning the office floors & toilets & taking out your trash. He can't clean your desk as he wouldn't know what is unimportant. You say this cleaning drive is for removing ...


12

She should have got confirmation of numbers before ordering tickets- many people can have valid excuses for not attending : medical, family commitments etc etc If the price of the ticket is not too onerous then, just for peace, you might consider to pay... BUT if the tickets are expensive then, in reality, she cannot force you to pay. Paying the reserve ...


11

She followed up once before ordering and I told her I still wasn't sure if I could go. It looks to me as though this is where it all went wrong. The point where she says, "I am following up now before ordering the tickets" is the point where your $10 charge for showing an interest turns into a commitment to pay her for the ticket she's buying on your ...


11

The person who organized this contest has left the company, and I was put in charge. Step 1 Gather all the data showing the flaws in the program. Step 2 Arrange a meeting with the manager that assigned you this task. Step 3 Present data and suggest that management needs to relieve you of oversight of this contest. The program as you describe it ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible