New answers tagged

0

If they are kind to you, go and tell them your eating habits. If they were truly kind, they would go somewhere all the team could eat. But if your coworkers are rude and treat you as a ghost, I would ask to not even go


3

Whatever you say or do, do not count on making your boss "see the light" (as in, really understand what did he do wrong, and repent). Think about this: even from a purely selfish viewpoint, in a game of 16 teams, 9 of which are his, all he stands to gain is 7x$20 = $140. That's a negligible amount, especially on a manager-level salary. What he's going to ...


1

I agree with most answers here. Do not make too much fuss over this (and do not join again). I like the teaming up against him with the other players, but I guess it depends on your boss whether he will appreciate being beaten at his own game. If there is any form of proof I would inform the other players. What I would like to add is that in my opinion ...


8

This is too small an issue to start making official complaints about, and as you say it is not technically cheating. Serous retribution is only going to make matters worse for yourselves. And as Bobby Tables says, paying $20 to find out your boss is an asshole is a pretty cheap lesson. However think about why your boss might be doing this. It's not about ...


37

I agree with the other posts, that this should be done in private. You should also make sure all of other players are on board with you. Check and see if they are upset about this as you are. If you still can't get your money back from your manager, then I suggest you use strategy as well. You said it was a 16 team league. I suggest coordinating with ...


269

You just paid $20 to find out your boss is a dishonest scumbag. That's money well spent.


12

You didn't say who confronted the boss, but the most experienced and most trusted person in the department needs to confront him a bit more ... forcefully ... and explain that what he has done will eventually destroy trust. The manager should be asked, in private, to return all of the money and apologize. It should be made completely clear that the manager ...


62

HR wouldn't be inappropriate to go to, but it wouldn't be advisable on a personal level. This is your dream job. Don't rock the boat. On principle, I think you should just go to the boss and ask for your money back. If he refuses, just calmly walk away. You gave him the chance to make things right. He didn't take it. Don't accuse him of cheating, just say ...


10

Isn't it more logical to use a working day instead? Certainly it makes more sense to do this during the work week, if you actually want people to attend. A company that isn't willing to have an event on company time sends a clear signal that this event isn't important.


1

Isn't it more logical to use a working day instead? Yes, perhaps it would be more logical to use a working day instead... if it were mandatory. You state that this event is optional, most likely due to the fact that it's on a weekend and people could already have plans or other things to do. That way, the people that want and can attend are welcome and ...


2

For reasons already covered by many other answers, this competition needs to be shut down*. It's obviously not achieving what it's meant to achieve, and it's causing bad feeling. Welcome to Goodhart's Law in action. Beyond that, even if you could ensure that everybody was playing fair... it's still a terrible idea. Each person has their own health needs, ...


1

I’m offering an alternative answer for completeness, because I think some of the other answers are better. But another way might be … “There have been accusations that people are cheating in the wellness program. Now, we have no proof of cheating, but to avoid future arguments, we are going to start requiring proof of accomplishments. And we will be ...


1

This answer may not fly at a huge company that is risk diverse but if my employees did this I would send out a simple email. And this is what SHOULD be done in a workplace since the company is trying to promote wellness and offering something that is being abused. I think the answers you got here are a bit of a joke because if people were lying and ...


-6

Silently disqualify the obvious cheaters. Do your due diligence with the eventual leaders. You may still end up awarding the best liar but that risk existed either way irrespective of how poorly accounted this contest is. Award is at the discretion of the company, who has indirectly elected you to be its agent. Use this discretion.


2

You could add a simple "proof" section to whatever form you're using. Something like a screenshot of their runkeeper app, a before/after image of them on a scale to show weight loss, etc. I know its still a system that's easy to cheat, but it'll prevent some people from doing the easy entry at the end of their day of their afternoon marathon... I'd also ...


-10

Since many of the reported activities are clearly fiction, pay the "winners" using monopoly money. That provides an in-kind response to the tongue in cheek submissions. That can then provide a basis for replacing the contest with one that is independently verifiable and based on health improvements (as others have noted).


7

Document the complaints Speak with your manager and HR about the cheating Propose that the competition gets shut down or that you get relieved of this duty Propose a plan for spending the money in a health-conscious way Try to get HR to send the shut down notice. If this burden falls on you then make sure to avoid expressing your feelings: Thank you to ...


3

Yes, these wellness competitions are usually unbelievable. My company ultimately ditched the prize aspect and went with a yearly survey that you fill out and get $100 dollars HSA credit. At my company we had a competition with a pedometer. A really obese individual claimed to have walked nearly 2/3 of the USA when you map out the steps to miles in a period ...


1

I'd suggest proposing to change the prize to a raffle-style drawing, where entries are earned by going to health related classes that you set up, i.e. invite a yoga instructor, or setup a cycling class, etc. For employees - that way you are actually helping employees get healthier, and can still offer a prize, however there will be other employees present so ...


11

The person who organized this contest has left the company, and I was put in charge. Step 1 Gather all the data showing the flaws in the program. Step 2 Arrange a meeting with the manager that assigned you this task. Step 3 Present data and suggest that management needs to relieve you of oversight of this contest. The program as you describe it ...


6

first. like others said. I suggest cancelling this competition. Give people the reasons why. Be polite and realize that you are messing with a prize pool that can change someones life if used well. You are going to get flack for doing this. no matter what. Right now it's just a matter of getting more people to understand than annoyed. As you stated it's way ...


38

Is it better to just award these individuals with far-fetched data and deal with everybody else getting mad at me? No, because then the biggest liar wins. Two wrongs (your predecessor not setting the competition right, and the employees lying) does not make a right. Or is it better to confront these individuals or disqualify them for clearly cheating? ...


21

Forget the competition. Corporate environments are competitive enough without pitting people who are already in great shape against people who could actually stand to benefit. The person who organized it is gone and you’re left with a sizable budget to promote health and wellness in the workplace. Use it how you see fit. One idea that comes to mind is to ...


-7

The people who are cheating know what they are doing. It would be unfair to anyone who legitimately participated in the wellness program to award the price to a obvious cheat, but also unfair if you cancel the program and cash prize altogether. I would recommend you send out a general email and wipe any contested records off the board. The person is then ...


178

Obviously not everyone is taking the contest seriously because it is so open to abuse. Hell if I was the obese guy and you had a "one size fits all" program why would I take it seriously? At 415 pounds I'm probably not going to run a marathon so how can I compete with the guy who can? At 5 foot and 100 pounds she probably isn't going to benchpress as much ...


8

You shouldn't kick anyone out of the program without running it past your supervisor or HR first. That said, if there are people cheating that blatantly there are probably more cheating by claiming plausible levels of activity while sitting on the couch all day. As broken as it's become, my recommendation would be to try and shut it down completely or to ...


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