175

If your company wants to have an exit interview, it is unlikely that you can avoid it (at least not without damaging your relationship with the company). Go to the interview. Feel free to politely answer questions without being brutally honest. "I don't have any suggestions to give you", for example, can just as easily mean that you're politely declining ...


147

Frankly, I think that in most cases, exit interviews are a self-delusional process. When management creates an exit interview process, they are thinking, "We will find out why employees are quitting. When someone is leaving, he presumably has no reason to fear any sort of retribution -- obviously he can't be fired or given undesirable assignments or ...


135

Your colleagues don't necessarily want you to do anything. Many times it simply feels good to share gripes with someone who is sympathetic and in these situations the listener is not expected to actually do anything about it. You might feel you're doing them a favor by bringing their concerns to management, but really that's what your co-workers should be ...


127

Should I be honest and tell my current employers that the reason I am leaving is because of there nonchalant attitude towards my role? Or do I avoid burning bridges by keeping it all genial and making up some other, unrelated reason? I usually suggest taking the high road, and giving only generalized reasons for leaving like "I really loved working ...


112

How to provide feedback about an unprofessional manager during the exit interview? Silently, in your head. Focus on where your career is going, not where it has been. Exit interviews are not for your benefit and bad mouthing anyone can come back to bite you while there is no plus side for you involved.


104

I'm resigning for ergonomic reasons and ideally I want to explain this at the exit interview, so they know it's nothing personal, and hopefully they will take action for others if they see that someone is actually leaving over it. Since it's nothing personal, is it professionally safe to explain my ergonomic reasons or should I just keep it vague ...


96

Looks like the company is getting ready to give you gardening leave, which is very common in the UK. Which essentially means - you go home, you don't go back to the office, you don't produce work for the company. The keep paying you until your end date. So, you are still employed till your last day, but not doing any actual work. The company may just not ...


79

Exit interviews serve several purposes, but not necessarily the ones that employees think. First they serve as a good place to make sure that all the things that need to turned in (laptops, phones, security badges) are turned in and that all exit processes have been taken care of. Next they serve to help identify trends over time. There are a couple of ...


70

While these questions are primarily designed to help your own employer, answering them constructively can help your own reputation and also may preserve a good relationship that may come in handy a few years down the road. There is no benefit to "burning bridges" Which company are you joining? What do they do? That depends a bit on the industry, but ...


68

How can I politely turn down the exit interview? Don't. Just attend the interview but remain noncommittal, control your temper and avoid saying anything negative. Resign yourself to wasting an hour or so regurgitating vague statements, trite phrases and meaningless pleasantries. Memorise phrases like: The opportunity was too good to pass up I learned so ...


58

Something that stood out to me: AFAIK, it is considered a bad practice to criticize your manager while still working at that company It is bad practice to criticise - but providing constructive feedback is very beneficial for both the manager and the people they are managing. There should be process in place, either scheduled 1-2-1s or some other ...


51

Exit interviews don't benefit the company. It benefits HR and that's about it. Conducted at the wrong time... When the employee has one foot out the door, they are already mentally/emotionally disengaged from the company. The correct time is often, no less than once a quarter. ...with the wrong questions... What are typical exit interview questions? ...


47

The line that stood out for me was : "these two colleagues are thinking about doing something about the issues in their department" This is a very good thing to do, but talk about the issues, not about the manager. For example : "I felt that some people weren't getting a chance to express their views in meetings and that we could have automated ...


45

First off, you never want to burn bridges. Burned bridges have a way of landing on your career at the least opportune time. It is best when engaged in an exit interview to be honest but obtuse in any criticism of the company. In any switch away from a company, you must keep in mind that this is not about them, it's about you. Something in your current ...


41

If there is a strong likelihood I will be handing in my resignation within a week, how should I handle today's review? Until the ink is dry, you treat this review as you would if you were not leaving. If that would mean that you raise concerns about your position and future with the company (or that your previous concerns were ignored), go nuts. If that ...


38

You will likely mess up relations even more by wiggling out of a social convention like an exit interview (if this is commonplace at your employer). You don't want your ex-boss, when asked for a reference of you, to think of you straight away as "the guy that wiggled out of the exit interview". This may be the last possibility of leaving a positive ...


33

The exit interview is not the place to give effective feedback. In the best situation employers would listen to their people while they are still working rather than when they are going out the door. Admittedly, that doesn't happen much in places where people are apt to leave. It seems that you have already voiced your concerns well in advance of ...


32

The moment you decide to leave a job, their problems stop being your problems. If they ask "what can we do in future to make life easier for other people who work here?" that's an opening to give them some feedback about problems in their building. But you cannot fix their problems. So you have nothing to gain from offering unsolicited advice. They've ...


29

Yes, it is actually very common. The only way that your exit interview will make an impact on the company is if what you say is shared with your boss and the higher-ups in the company. It's also very hard to anonymize what you say, as your boss will know who it's coming from the moment they hear "this is coming from the exit interview" from the HR person. ...


29

Getting "furious" over this seems a bit of an overreaction - especially as there's a good chance your boss has simply misunderstood HR policy rather than being malicious. That said - it is also not uncommon for employees/employers to come to an agreement that the employee leaves earlier than their notice period when they are resigning, for various reasons - ...


27

Use the same strategy as breaking up a romantic relationship: "It's not you, it's me." And make it value-neutral. "I looked for and got a new job because I wanted a change. It's not that you're doing something wrong here, it's just that I want to do something else."


27

I'd still say - do not go into details, give them a very generalized reason and move on. As you mentioned in another comment that when you wanted to discuss / report this issue, HR folks got angry, so most likely citing the same reason for leaving is not going to be taken positively and appreciated. There'e nothing for you to gain by providing any feedback ...


26

My personal guideline is that I never say anything against a specific person, but I may bring up certain corporate policies especially concerning pay and benefits that may have recently changed for the worse. For instance, if a copmany has frozen pay raises, they should know that it is causing people to leave. If a company has required pay cuts, again, ...


25

Don't say anything to the company.What your colleagues told you was confidential and you don't want to breach that confidentiality. Yes, you're part of an unhappy trend for your employer but your employer will eventually figure out that trend on their own as more and more people vote with their feet and leave. If your employer doesn't figure it out, then ...


24

It's not about you, it's about them. As an organisation, they want to learn as well. Getting new employees up to speed is quite costly, and leaving employees will take a lot of knowledge with them which is not available to the organisation anymore. So it often is in their interest to retain employees instead of losing them. So if they can understand the ...


24

I don't like exit interviews for the same reasons, but thinking back, most of the exit interviews I've done weren't interviews at all. I don't remember anyone ever asking me why I was leaving, or asking for suggestions on improving things. They already knew why I was leaving. Generally, you don't have to go to an exit interview if you don't want to. But, ...


21

Okay, you are elated you have found a new job and are moving on. The sun is shining and your old boss is gently prodding you to find out the items you mentioned. It's a trifle, and you will lose nothing by answering, right? WRONG! Please pause to think about the following: Do you have a firm offer? Have you signed a contract with your new employer? Is your ...


21

Can they do this when it was agreed that my last day would be the 8th April? It wouldn't be unusual for a company not to be comfortable having someone around for another month. That's particularly true for someone who has already clashed with others at least several times. I believe in the UK it would be typical to pay you for the rest of your notice ...


21

I went through something similar in my last role, as did the entire team of designers that eventually left within a few weeks/months after I did due to the manager of the team. You are right. It is unprofessional to directly criticise your line manager yes, but it's not to indicate why you left in a less direct manner in a way they can put 2 and 2 ...


21

Tell them the reason you're leaving; it's a solid reason, and that knowledge may help them prevent future employees from leaving. However - don't leave it at that. If you're going to be honest and deliver some bad news to them, you should also deliver good news. Make sure they know that you enjoyed everything else about the job, and single some items and ...


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