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277

But something I need to do. But what? Provide your feedback in a "constructive way", and be done about it. Not your place to make decisions. Mention something along the lines of "It was good to get a chance to evaluate the product X. As I see it: - Pros: 1, 2, 3 - Cons: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, ...... As it is evident from the analysis ...


227

For the purposes of this, I'm going to assume that at least the bare facts of the reviews are accurate (i.e., that the company uses older technologies and sometimes requires legacy code from new hires). That being the case, I'd actually lean towards "Ignore it", perhaps even with a mixture of "Embrace it". The whole point of Glassdoor reviews is so you can ...


208

You're looking at this "problem" the wrong way. The way your question reads is "People are leaving negative reviews, therefore people shouldn't be leaving negative reviews, how do we stop people from leaving negative reviews, or have the negative reviews removed to keep our reputation?". That's the mindset that makes you deserving of those negative reviews....


206

I write apps and make intranet sites. I have several apps that give surveys, tests, and quizzes to close to 100k employees. My apps log SSO information and IP address. So if your company has some sort of SSO (anything that you log into) you can pass those variables over to the survey. Also no matter how anonymous you think something is they have your ...


200

Unless Clint finds any major, “do not deploy”, bugs, I would simply thank him for his feedback and explain to him how you intend to address the points he raises (if valid) in future releases. If he has a problem with this, then you have the opportunity to explain why it would be better for him to give feedback earlier. Ultimately, it is his problem he is ...


178

The first sign that you're not is the fact that you're concerned that you might be. Give me someone who's a little insecure over a know-it-all any day. It means you're going to ask questions, double check things, ask for opinions, and look for ways to improve. Another sign is that you're not getting feedback. I tend to not give feedback if something ...


167

What they did was unprofessional. You should reply to the group email with copies of your original emails and something like this. I'm very sorry that you feel that my samples were limited. I am a bit confused as to why this is the first time I am hearing of this, as I sent the examples twice, and even asked if anything was unclear or missing. If you ...


164

The request is ridiculous on every level. First how will the manager/HR lock your email in a cabinet? You don't ever ever ever send a sensitive username/password over email. There is a small chance that this could be part of a phishing attack. At best now your boss/HR's computer/laptop is a single point of failure for security at the whole office. ...


162

We can't possibly know what drove this person to make those comments. Maybe he is simply a jerk on a power-trip. Maybe the company has a strategy of making you feel like crap, and thus feel super lucky for getting an offer from them, for a smaller salary than you requested. Overall, I would say that you should always try to separate the interviewer's ...


159

Should I approach him about this behavior? I would only do this if this person is falling behind on their tasks, or their work quality worsens. You just said that this person is a "good employee otherwise, and he works a lot of hours", so I take it that this person actually works hard and delivers their tasks on time. If this is true, I see no reason why ...


146

As long as you kept your feedback limited to the things she did, what the effect of those things were and what she could do to get a better outcome I don't see how anything you have said could be construed as being related in any way to her gender. She has tried to make it about gender, not you because she has taken it personally and to be fair as you are ...


128

You cannot get anything more from Amazon. There is no benefit to Amazon in continuing to correspond with you. But I have also interviewed at Amazon, and have done a lot of interviewing myself, and can tell you what happens on the other side of the table. At companies like Amazon, candidates are rarely rejected for lack of some specific technical ...


126

Stop selling yourself short: the positive feedback is deserved. The expectations for junior developers hired fresh out of university are generally very low, you're a single step above an intern on the totem pole. Most companies hire them as a bit of a gamble, expecting that they'll be dead weight for a year or more, but will with some luck blossom into ...


117

My input is take this to your manager. Constructive feedback in a code review is one thing. Calling you out up to several times a day in front of peers is pushing bullying. Tell your boss straight up It is hurting my morale. I used to enjoy work. Constructive structured feedback is great but calling me out up to several times a day in front ...


116

While the other answers are good, you have mentioned something new and relevant in a comment, which might be causing the specific behaviour from your teammates in your case. You said: I'm also the most senior dev in the team That could be important here. In that case, I can easily imagine that you are treated with extra deference / respect, and a mixture ...


112

"I received feedback from my manager that a colleague found a code review comment of mine hurtful." "I looked over my recent comments and did not find anything that seemed objectionable to me" You need to communicate your manager and use the manager as a go-between to reconcile these two statements. Once words are out of our mouths, they take a life and ...


105

The trouble with "very difficult to work with" isn't that it's insulting - it's that it gives no way for the recipient of that information to improve. If you really want to help this person improve, you need to be saying what it is about this person that makes them so difficult to work with, why this makes your work harder, and how they need to change to ...


105

would it be unprofessional from my side to reply to the mail Yes, you should not be doing this without taking it to your manager first. Best case scenario and the professional way any dispute like this is done should actually be your manager doing the emailing, you have no business getting into a confrontation. Your manager is the buffer between you and ...


98

Short answer: Not normally, but they may be reluctant to answer if they would give a negative response. I don't know what your friend is talking about, saying that it's rude. It's called "due diligence", to find out as much information as you can about a company before you end up somewhere that isn't a good match. Most friends would answer quite happily, ...


95

This behaviour is highly unprofessional and likely indicative of the workplace culture at this company. If he's comfortable behaving this way in front of total strangers during a job interview, I highly doubt that he behaves any better with his colleagues (and particularly his subordinates) in the office. I would definitely not be accepting an offer after ...


90

You don't have to badmouth him. You can be honest and still express concerns. For example, tell the interviewers: Ask to see his code samples - check that they're up to the standard you expect. Talk to him about code reviews and how he handles change-management. See how well he will fit into your existing team. He has quite a strong personality. Now, ...


89

Should we say something to management about this guy actually not being that great? That depends on your role. If you are a contractor brought in to work on specific projects, then you put your head down, get your own work done, and ignore the company politics and the abilities of the people around you. That's what you were hired to do. On the other ...


84

It depends on how the interview came about. I have been contacted in the past without me soliciting for the position. They contacted me and invited me to an interview. They had to know that I wasn't ready to leave. The offer wasn't impressive, so I didn't take it. Another time I was contacted via Monster. It ended up being perfect timing because a few ...


71

You can't force people to give you feedback. From what you say, you have already contacted them by email - this is about the limit of what you can do. It is entirely possibly that the reason for declining is something the interviewers are embarrassed about (or can't talk about). Some companies have a policy of not divulging the reasons for fear of legal ...


71

The sound you hear is ten thousand network administrators screaming "NO!" at this post. At best, this is attempt to see just how gullible you are. I would actually suspect this is the case, as security auditing tests mainly for social exploits, these days. At worst, this is the sign of completely inept management (I mean thoroughly, as in their parents ...


69

That is a ludicrous request on so many levels in a HIPAA environment. Should not ask in the first place Should not email Should not keep it in a file cabinet It is a Windows logon If you have Local logon rather than a Domain then I don't see how you would even be HIPAA compliant in the first place. In a Domain a Domain Admin can lock an account or change ...


67

If you believe that a coworker is operating in cronyistic manner and playing fast and loose with company funds, yes, that is something you should raise with your manager. Saying the software is "crap" is not likely to get you much traction. You must quantify how it is substandard, and how the business will not get the appropriate value for money. Just as ...


66

Either a code review is required for the release, or it is not required. If it is required, then the reviewer must be responsible for reviewing this in time. You must have the power to go to his desk and say "drop everything else and do this review, or we can't make the release date". And you must have the power to say "sorry, we couldn't release in time ...


65

Uh so there are some other answers here that deal with, you know, your actual question. I'm more interested in the whole "not sending the employee on the trip" aspect. Just go to the end if you want my answer to your actual question though. Penalising an employee out of the blue is a terrible management decision. and From what i'm reading here, ...


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