9

Try to have a one-on-one with your coworker. Discuss the problems you both faced. Apologize for the bad brief. Ask for his input about how you can communicate more efficiently in the future (and listen to it!). Focus on how you can improve the situation instead of sheding blame or shuffling guilt around. Hope that he is an equally constructive person.


8

I couldn't come up with a good answer for the question because such an outcome would indicate a massive failure on my part. I think I would quit a job where I got any since that would mean I screwed up badly This is exactly why they ask the question. To filter out people who won't take negative feedback well or use it constructively (even if harsh). ...


7

Use every opportunity to show your strength. They are not really bothered about whether you actually faced that scenario or not, they want to know your mindset on how you will handle when that scenario happens. If a day comes when you have to face / handle that scenario - what would be your mindset, thought process, strategy and mental strength to counter / ...


7

You don't have to consciously try to slow down. What you have to do is interact with the people you are talking to, instead of just talking. As you make points in your talk, look at the listeners. Look at their reactions. If they aren't reacting, pause and wait for some response: a nod, a question, etc. By doing this you'll learn to deliver ...


6

I know what it feels like if someone speaks way too fast. It is hard to follow because a lot of information comes to you in a short time and words are likely spoken unclear if someone speaks really fast. In these cases I thought at least they could make a short break every now and then, it would give me some time to sort out the many words a little better. ...


4

Okay, this isn't going to be an answer to the question you're directly asking; this is going to address the core issue here: You need to learn to fail. I'm not sure whether you're willing to take any of this on board, but this isn't an issue of "What do I tell the recruiter?" It's an issue of needing to learn how to fail and how to fail in a positive way - ...


2

Regarding your performance: Do you have reason to believe you will receive a bad performance review after 6 months? If not, then no news is good news, it means your manager has nothing interesting to say to you and you can expect to pass your performance review. If you do believe you have a problem that needs addressing, then you should ask your manager ...


2

I would take the following steps: Firstly, and perhaps most obviously, you may need to just buckle down and practice talking slowly. When you've got a whole lot of information in your brain and you feel the need to get it out, human speech can seem like a frustrating bottleneck. But you have to keep in mind that even if you talk fast, that doesn't mean ...


1

The interview question you're asking about is a behavioral question. The ultimate goal of such questions is to assess whether you are an authentic and reasonable person to work with. These questions can be difficult, but your answer has to be true and from your own work experience. Your answer might not be an impressive answer or you might draw a blank but ...


1

There are two things to mention: About your knowledge. Please don't make the mistake of not asking for help out of pride, as this is the most common reason for being fired or let go as a junior developer. Indeed, your colleagues know that you lack knowledge and you are a junior, so it's fine if you don't know the basic technologies for now. What you have to ...


1

You should ask for feedback about the quality of your work, and about how you can improve. This will always be true in your career, no just during your probation. Asking for feedback doesn't make you look desperate, it makes you look professional. And, when a new probationer joins your department, you now know it's a good idea to give constructive feedback. ...


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